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danepak

694 posts

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#255759 27-Aug-2019 22:14
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I was hoping that someone could help me.

 

I'm missing a small metal thing (see photo) of the inside of the fitting. On one of the photos you can see it. On the other one, it's missing.

 

Without it, I can't screw the lightbulb in.

 

I've been to Bunnings, Mitre 10 and JA Russell. None of them can assist.

 

 

 

The actual model of the outdoor lamp is: http://thelightbulbshop.co.nz/fittings/incandescent-fittings/qhf560-twin-floodflight-sensor/#.XWT_fJMzaps

 

I could obviously buy a new one, but then I'll need an electrician to install it as well.

 

 

 

Any help is much appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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sparkz25
558 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2307073 27-Aug-2019 22:23
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You will pretty much have to replace that lamp holder or replace the entire fitting.

 

Bunnings and Miter 10 Will not have that part at all as that metal part is part of the porcelain lamp holder itself.

 

If to go to Ideal or J.A.Russell you should be able to get a replacement porcelain lamp holder if you chose to go down that track.


Technofreak
3986 posts

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  #2307074 27-Aug-2019 22:27
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It's part of the receptacle, you won't be able to buy it separately.

 

It's my guess if came out when the bulb was unscrewed from the receptacle. 

 

You may get lucky and be able to buy a receptacle that fits onto that light fitting, otherwise unfortunately you'll need to buy a complete new fitting.





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sparkz25
558 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2307079 27-Aug-2019 22:39
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Short Answer is no, you can try but you will be better off replacing the lamp holder as a whole.

 

when you put new lamps in, Put a small blob of graphite or anti-seize on the thread of the lamp to prevent it corroding and getting stuck and don't over tighten the lamps.


danepak

694 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2307090 27-Aug-2019 23:04
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OK, thanks


SomeoneSomewhere
274 posts

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  #2307401 28-Aug-2019 16:56
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If you're the homeowner, and you follow the instructions in ECP 51, you can do some electrical work. Including replacing light fittings.

 

 

https://codehub.building.govt.nz/home/resources/nzecp-512004/

scuwp
3343 posts

Uber Geek


  #2307464 28-Aug-2019 19:35
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You can replace like for like, this is a pretty simple install IMO.  Just replace the whole thing. I don't believe you need a Sparky.   





Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



 
 
 
 


E3xtc
691 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2307587 29-Aug-2019 07:44
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Just do the necessary/obvious and isolate the circuit/power before doing anything :O 


TheMantis
137 posts

Master Geek


  #2307775 29-Aug-2019 12:42
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Don’t forget to test for isolation using the correct functional test equipment before commencing work. This is clearly stated in ECP 51, paragraph 1.6.1 and 1.6.2 and is mandatory.

duckDecoy
152 posts

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  #2307781 29-Aug-2019 13:00
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TheMantis: Don’t forget to test for isolation using the correct functional test equipment before commencing work. This is clearly stated in ECP 51, paragraph 1.6.1 and 1.6.2 and is mandatory.

 

Edit: added @TheMantis tag

 

I know zero about electrical work, but now im curious.  What is the test/equipment that you (or a typical home owner) would use to do this?


SomeoneSomewhere
274 posts

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  #2307786 29-Aug-2019 13:15
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A multimeter or something else capable of measuring 250+ AC volts. Clip-on ammeters and some other test gear will also usually have the same functions. Do not use a meter set to current mode, and ensure the leads are in the correct terminals. Some meters default to DC; you'll need to change this. Test between all conductors present, and preferably a known good ground like an extension lead to the nearest socket.

 

 

Prove that the meter is working on a known live source (e.g. a power socket) before and after you do the test. Prove-test-prove. This ensures that your meter is set correctly and hasn't been damaged while you're testing.

 

 

ECP51 doesn't allow you to use non-contact testers (the ones that you hold up to a cable and they beep). They are prone to false positives, and occasionally give false negatives in cases like neutral screened cable (big cables like your house mains, generally only found underground or in some older commercial facilities), DC, and wet cable.

Technofreak
3986 posts

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  #2307792 29-Aug-2019 13:24
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duckDecoy:

 

TheMantis: Don’t forget to test for isolation using the correct functional test equipment before commencing work. This is clearly stated in ECP 51, paragraph 1.6.1 and 1.6.2 and is mandatory.

 

Edit: added @TheMantis tag

 

I know zero about electrical work, but now im curious.  What is the test/equipment that you (or a typical home owner) would use to do this?

 

 

Stick a screw driver across the terminals. If it sparks and arcs it's not safe to work on. If the sparking and arcing stops while screw driver is across the terminals then you've probably been successful in blowing the circuit breaker or fuse, then it's probably safe to work on. 

 

If there was no sparking and arcing at all then the circuit was most likely already isolated therefore safe to work on.

 

Just joking.

 

In all seriousness you would use a multimeter or an AC tester.





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duckDecoy
152 posts

Master Geek


  #2307799 29-Aug-2019 13:30
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SomeoneSomewhere: A multimeter or something else capable of measuring 250+ AC volts. Clip-on ammeters and some other test gear will also usually have the same functions. Do not use a meter set to current mode, and ensure the leads are in the correct terminals. Some meters default to DC; you'll need to change this. Test between all conductors present, and preferably a known good ground like an extension lead to the nearest socket.

 

@SomeoneSomewhere

 

Can you give me more details as to what you are doing here?  Its not that I plan to do it, its that I know zero and am curious.

 

I assumed you are putting the leads onto the positive and negative bits of the light and seeing if any current is flowing (or voltage is present, not sure of terminology).  But I don't understand the ground wire statement, so perhaps that's not what you're doing.


duckDecoy
152 posts

Master Geek


  #2307800 29-Aug-2019 13:32
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Technofreak:

 

Stick a screw driver across the terminals. If it sparks and arcs it's not safe to work on.

 

 

Are you using this technique because its too difficult to squeeze your tongue down there and give it a lick?


SomeoneSomewhere
274 posts

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  #2307804 29-Aug-2019 13:40
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You're looking for voltage being present.

 

 

Voltage is always measured between two points. A sensor light like OP has potentially has at least four terminals inside it - earth, neutral, phase in, and the sensor-switched phase out. I personally wouldn't test to the inside of the bulb socket; you have too much chance of touching both terminals at once.

 

 

It's easier to explain and safer to simply say to test everything, rather than only those which are really necessary. It also helps avoid the risk of things being wrongly coloured/labelled.

 

 

There's a vanishingly small chance that *all* the wires at the fitting are live. If so, you'll never see any voltage between them, but could still get a shock. If we test to another point, like the actual physical dirt, or the earth terminal on a socket (which should be safe to touch - it's connected to the metal case of all your appliances), we know that's not happened either.

 

 


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