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67 posts

Master Geek


# 260233 16-Nov-2019 22:02
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Hi,

 

Many years ago . . . . . . .  when I worked for a living, we regularly used Silicone as an adhesive/sealer for industrial ovens, Laboratory Freezers, and many other climate controlled "enclosures" for various customers.

 

Other colleagues (builders, carpenters, plumbers etc), also used a similar "Silicone" product for installing double glazing, conservatories, and sealing under and around sinks (small gaps). We simply referred to it as "Silicone".

 

I've been looking for a similar product recently, and am amazed at how far this industry has come. I see isles full of various tubes in Mitre 10, Bunnings and Hammer hardware (etc), all for different uses ranging from gap fillers, to non-curing moisture sealers, to roof & gutter sealants, bath sealers, anti-fungal products and the list goes on.

 

I'm looking for a product which can be applied via a caulking gun, can be "finished" by dragging a finger along it (water helps here), will stay reasonably flexible, but the skin hardens after 2 - 24 hours, and which has adhesive qualities to stick wood, metal, plastics etc together.

 

Having recently had a kitchen sink fitted by a local Kitchen Manufacturer, they used a very similar product to fit our sink into the worktop - made a lovely job. I've emailed them too, but so far no answer.

 

Any help appreciated.


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118 posts

Master Geek


  # 2355203 17-Nov-2019 16:05
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Most sealants aren't particularly sticky. I wouldn't rely on them for any kind of structural use.

 

All of them should do a reasonable job for what you're after I think. Pick the colour you want and whatever's cheapest.

 

If it's for electrical work you'll want something neutral cure as acetic/acid cure products offgas acetic acid, which will corrode copper in the near vicinity.


neb

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  # 2355215 17-Nov-2019 16:18
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SomeoneSomewhere:

All of them should do a reasonable job for what you're after I think. Pick the colour you want and whatever's cheapest.

 

 

Also, check whether it's paintable or capable of having anything adhere to it, like a recoat at a later time. Some silicones produced for wet areas have low surface activity, nothing will adhere to them.

 

 

Oh, and check flexibility as well, some cure to a rubbery consistency, others go quite hard, if it's going somewhere where a bit of flexing is required then you'l want to get a softer-curing one.

 
 
 
 


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  # 2355239 17-Nov-2019 17:29
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Pro Tip: It’s best not to finish off sealant with your finger - finger can contaminate the sealant - introducing bacteria which can later lead to mould.

Think about using these things - they easily give a real professional finish without breaking the bank:

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/paint-partner-silicone-scrapers-yellow-4pk_p01660196

 

 





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  # 2355244 17-Nov-2019 18:04
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Just depends where it's being used. I've used slightly flexible stuff in the corners where tiles join to handle expansion, but quite hard stuff to hold my stone benchtop to my cupboards where it's unlikely to flex.

My normal goto is Sikaflex

neb

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  # 2355405 17-Nov-2019 23:51
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eracode:

Think about using these things - they easily give a real professional finish without breaking the bank:

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/paint-partner-silicone-scrapers-yellow-4pk_p01660196

 

 

Those things aren't very good, they tend to drag the sealant along with them and produce a messy finish. Better is a finger wrapped in glad wrap and dipped in slightly soapy water.

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  # 2355416 18-Nov-2019 05:48
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neb:
eracode:

 

Think about using these things - they easily give a real professional finish without breaking the bank:

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/paint-partner-silicone-scrapers-yellow-4pk_p01660196

 

Those things aren't very good, they tend to drag the sealant along with them and produce a messy finish. Better is a finger wrapped in glad wrap and dipped in slightly soapy water.

 

Not correct. I have used them with silicon sealants  - simple to use, no drag and a very professional-looking result. Definitely not messy.





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Master Geek


  # 2355563 18-Nov-2019 10:30
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Thanks everyone - I decided to use Ados Universal Silicone. It's adhered nicely, and has started to cure after just a few hours.

 

Insane: I'll also check out Sikaflex - thanks for the recommendation.

 

 

 

Appreciate everyone's responses - have a great week.

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 2355699 18-Nov-2019 13:15
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eracode:

Those things aren't very good, they tend to drag the sealant along with them and produce a messy finish. Better is a finger wrapped in glad wrap and dipped in slightly soapy water.

 

Not correct. I have used them with silicon sealants  - simple to use, no drag and a very professional-looking result. Definitely not messy.

 

 

I made my comment based on experience with them, maybe they work better/worse with different sealants.

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  # 2355703 18-Nov-2019 13:20
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neb:
eracode:

 

Those things aren't very good, they tend to drag the sealant along with them and produce a messy finish. Better is a finger wrapped in glad wrap and dipped in slightly soapy water.

 

Not correct. I have used them with silicon sealants  - simple to use, no drag and a very professional-looking result. Definitely not messy.

 

I made my comment based on experience with them, maybe they work better/worse with different sealants.

 

Yes - I can imagine that they might not work quite so well with the type of sealant like No More Gaps. It’s not silicone and is quite a different consistency. Haven’t tried with that.





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  # 2355706 18-Nov-2019 13:27
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No more gaps isn't silicone, and is fairly easy to smooth. I got a different one recently, a colored silicone, and getting that do anything smoothly is REALLY much more difficult. The pro's do a perfect job, but I have no idea how.

 

I'm planning on removing the damaged silicone from our tile shower and replacing it, but I'm not sure how I can do it and do a good job. The pros are saying $500 and it's half a day's work. I'd just cut the old stuff away, put down some tape as a guide, and put new silicone out.

 

Anyone know how to do a really nice job with silicone?


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  # 2355720 18-Nov-2019 13:43
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eracode:

Yes - I can imagine that they might not work quite so well with the type of sealant like No More Gaps. It’s not silicone and is quite a different consistency. Haven’t tried with that.

 

 

Ahh, good point! I used acrylic sealant because it's paintable, obviously that's not the right thing for the spatulas, although Bunnings advertise them as for "caulk, silicone or grout". So perhaps do a trial run first, or start with the spatulas and fall back to something else if they don't perform too well.

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  # 2355740 18-Nov-2019 14:26
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timmmay:

 

No more gaps isn't silicone, and is fairly easy to smooth. I got a different one recently, a colored silicone, and getting that do anything smoothly is REALLY much more difficult. The pro's do a perfect job, but I have no idea how.

 

I'm planning on removing the damaged silicone from our tile shower and replacing it, but I'm not sure how I can do it and do a good job. The pros are saying $500 and it's half a day's work. I'd just cut the old stuff away, put down some tape as a guide, and put new silicone out.

 

Anyone know how to do a really nice job with silicone?

 

 

 

 

I have done it in the shower in our previous home. You can buy ‘silicone sealant remover’ from Bunnings. Cut away the excess with a snap-knife, paint on the remover, leave it a while, clean it off.

 

Re-do with new silicone in a caulking gun and clean off the excess with plastic finishing tools I linked above. It’s really not difficult to get a pro-looking job.

 

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/selleys-silicone-remover-375g_p00340602

 

 





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Master Geek


  # 2355805 18-Nov-2019 15:07
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neb:
eracode:

 

Think about using these things - they easily give a real professional finish without breaking the bank:

https://www.bunnings.co.nz/paint-partner-silicone-scrapers-yellow-4pk_p01660196

 

Those things aren't very good, they tend to drag the sealant along with them and produce a messy finish. Better is a finger wrapped in glad wrap and dipped in slightly soapy water.

 

spray some water 


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  # 2356982 18-Nov-2019 21:09
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eracode:

 

I have done it in the shower in our previous home. You can buy ‘silicone sealant remover’ from Bunnings. Cut away the excess with a snap-knife, paint on the remover, leave it a while, clean it off.

 

Re-do with new silicone in a caulking gun and clean off the excess with plastic finishing tools I linked above. It’s really not difficult to get a pro-looking job.

 

 

Getting the old stuff off sounds easy enough. The problem I have is when I use a caulking gun I can never squeeze it quite smoothly - some bits have none, some bits have too much. So I try to smooth the stuff where I put too much to where I put not enough, it's wider some places than others, etc. The stuff the pro did is dead straight and uniform. Only way I could go that straight is with tape!

 

When I use sealers now I usually use the no more gaps that pushes itself out with a button, but I have to use a proper gun for this as it only comes that way.

 

Maybe I should just hire someone to do it, but they all said it's a 4-6 hours work and will cost $500 - $600. I really only need one side of the shower done too.


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Uber Geek


  # 2357023 18-Nov-2019 22:23
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timmmay: The stuff the pro did is dead straight and uniform. Only way I could go that straight is with tape!


The pro probably uses tape too.

Sealant in a shower always ends up mouldy. The trick is to hide the sealant if possible or have a narrow bead.

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