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24 posts

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  #2409387 28-Jan-2020 21:35
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Just back to the plan, +1 re the fridge but also I would look at doors at the entry as a heat trap. As the entrance opens directly in to the living area, as soon as the door is opened, all the heat from the house disappears outside.


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  #2409400 28-Jan-2020 22:32
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Cody64:

Just back to the plan, +1 re the fridge but also I would look at doors at the entry as a heat trap. As the entrance opens directly in to the living area, as soon as the door is opened, all the heat from the house disappears outside.

 

 

Good point. Also the entrance is going to accumulate shoes, coats, umbrellas, and other stuff, so consider putting a second door where it joins the living room to close it off rather than making it part of the living room. Then put a second doormat in front of the inner door for people who are leaving dirty/muddy footwear and similar in the tiled entrance area before they get to the (presumably) carpeted living room.

 
 
 
 


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  #2409407 28-Jan-2020 23:34
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neb: Woohoo, everyone gets to play peanut gallery! In my case the thing that stands out is the area marked "living room", that's not a living room it's an oversized hallway connecting all the highest-traffic areas in the house. I would perhaps extend the Family room upwards so it takes up some of the current Living Room, and then just treat what's left as a hallway.

 

I think it'll be ok -  the only people who will really use the front door are visitors, most of the family will enter and exit via the garage (that's my experience with internal access garages anyway).

 

neb: You could also make the ensuite wide rather than deep, along the entire wall, and make the master bedroom larger with a wardrobe along a wall rather than a walk-in. My parents have a walk-in wardrobe (must have been fashionable when they built) and it ended up as a glorified broom cupboard, all the stuff they wore regularly they kept outside the walk-in and the walk-in was used for clothes storage. In other words put the ensuite up against the right-hand wall with a cavity slider rather than door (saves space), and a wardrobe along the wall between the ensuite and bedroom. Gives you a much bigger bedroom with no loss in functionality.

 

This will cost you on resale. There is an expectation that a modern 4 bedroom house has a walk in wardrobe. You just need to make sure you fit it out effectively so it has lots of drawers as well as hanging space. This one looks a nice size 2.2m wide is really usable with lots of room to dress.


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  #2409408 28-Jan-2020 23:37
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neb:
Cody64:

 

Just back to the plan, +1 re the fridge but also I would look at doors at the entry as a heat trap. As the entrance opens directly in to the living area, as soon as the door is opened, all the heat from the house disappears outside.

 

Good point. Also the entrance is going to accumulate shoes, coats, umbrellas, and other stuff, so consider putting a second door where it joins the living room to close it off rather than making it part of the living room. Then put a second doormat in front of the inner door for people who are leaving dirty/muddy footwear and similar in the tiled entrance area before they get to the (presumably) carpeted living room.

 

Definitely agree with the second door. We have this in our NZ house and it is excellent, especially in winter. You could also put a door into the garage in here,


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  #2409411 28-Jan-2020 23:56
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33coupe:

 

One big heatpump has been put by the living / dining area, hopefully it will be sufficient.

 

 

It won't be and you will be miserable. This is one area where stretching the budget by 10k will make a material difference to your quality of life. Either go ducted or put small units in the bedroom. It will also make the house easier to sell and make you healthier. Internationally no one only heats the lounge.

 

33coupe:

 

In regards to tech stuff that was my next question! lol. my friend has a recent build and he hasnt used any of data cables, all just wifi so am a bit unsure what to do. I'm guessing I would have all comms stuff in the storage area, so would need help and ideas with that (have no idea lol). My 5.1 & turntable would be in family area, so probably have a/v stack system in a corner there. may need to ask about putting speaker cable in walls?

 

 

You should run cabling back to the garage and install a patch panel and comms cabinet. Also make sure that there is conduit installed with a draw wire so chorus can pull through fibre and you don't have horrible external cabling and penetrations you don't need. Really test your sparky and make sure he knows what he's doing, very few house bashers have a clue. Once he has given you a statement of works and post it here before you agree. Don't be afraid to take this out of the sparkies scope and give it to someone competent. If he mentions daisy chaining cat6 this means he is clueless about datacabling.

 

You can run these cables yourself in a day on a weekend before the walls are lined. It will cost you $200 for a drum of CAT6 and another $200-$300 for a comms cabinet and a 24 way patch panel. If the budget is tight you don't have to terminate the other end, just leave it coiled up in a flush box. Then if you need it you can install an RJ45 and you have the guts of your network. Also make sure you run at least 3 cat6 to the ceiling space so you can run POE APs mounted on the ceiling.

 

Also generally. Assume nothing. Get everything in writing and check back in writing if it's not clear. Changes before you sign the contract are cheap and can be negotiated, after you sign they are expensive, once they start building they are very expensive. Get in the contract what the builders markup is for variations (all markups should be on nett pricing after discounts and rebates).

 

If you see something you don't like on site stop the work and check what they are doing. If you don't get an answer you like stop the work and sort it out.

 

Get a good lawyer and don't be afraid to challenge the "standard" contract. You will spend a couple of thousand up front and dramatically reduce your risk and potential cost.

 

 


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  #2409426 29-Jan-2020 06:41
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Change the door on the walk in wardrobe to a cavity slider. I'd make the door to the "studay" a cavity slider too as that room is too small. I think the two children's bedrooms are smaller than ideal.

 

Use high density plasterboard on both sides of the walls around the bathrooms. Have those internal walls insulated. Insulate the hot water pipes, most plumbers won't bother. No hot water cylinder? 

 

Having a window directly over a bed may mean cold air continuously falling on you in winter unless you have high end joinery, which seldom happens in a standard New Zealand build. Standard minimum spec joinery is only one third better than old single glazing. What are the joinery and insulation specs?

 

You could add a security door to the bedroom door for cooling purposes. Standard full height awning windows are hopeless at cooling ventilation. 

 

4 element cooktop? You only need another 11 or 12cm for a 5th element.  Go flush mount if you're going to be cooking with gas as it's much more convenient. 

 

Have a bench surface area you can put hot things straight out of the oven on. 

 

The fridge cavity is 2 person household sized. 

 

I agree with being able to door off the TV from the kitchen. Open plan is the current fad but kitchen noises like chopping, frying, fridge and dishwasher aren't good movie soundtracks. Rangehood motors are noisy so see if you can get one with the motor away from the cooking area. 

 

Another personal bug bear are Laundries in the Garage... Personally I hate them... in the middle of winter they are always cold places, you could look at using part of you hall storage as a laundry with a front loading washer dryer...

 

Carpeting the garage floor and having an insulated garage door should help. Make sure they insulate between the garage and the rest of the house.

 

1100mm is way too wide for a fridge in 95% of the cases? Most double door fridges like French or side by side at very most are 915mm or under.

 

Not much larger than 800mm is needed to home a few double door models from F&P, Panasonic, Electrolux and Westinghouse. 

 

One big heatpump has been put by the living / dining area, hopefully it will be sufficient.

 

Do you know what model?

 

A dark roof or cladding will mean more overheating in summer unless you're in Invercargill. 


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  #2409437 29-Jan-2020 08:05
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Well done @33coupe for putting your house design up and asking for comments. We're currently watching the builder turn our house design into reality... with a move in date scheduled for May.

 

Something we spent hours on is the 'indoor outdoor flow', and how well our 'outside room' integrates with the rest of the house.  Your floor plan doesn't show the direction of North, whether the land is flat or the rest of the garden, etc. 

 

It looks like the 4th bedroom is in the middle of this. this could be a problem if the BBQ extends into the evening and you want the kids to go to sleep.

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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Ultimate Geek


  #2409458 29-Jan-2020 08:30
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We have gone with ducted heating in our new place, x2 small 8kw units, 1 for the bedroom area, 1 for the living areas. Slightly more expensive than a big 14kw unit, but will allow us to control temperatures much better with ability to have either/or operating and different temperatures for the different zones.

 

Our last house was not dissimilar in shape to your one, agree 1000 percent about 1 heat pump not being enough. Ours was in the living area, was around 6kw I think. It heated that area ok, but would struggle with the home theatre (that opened off the living room) and did nothing down the hallways. In Christchurch, no heating down the hallways / bedrooms was not pleasant, ended up with oil column heaters in the bedrooms.

 

Your lounge / family room is a good size for a projector room, you would be able to get around 106 - 120 inch screen on the wall next to the entry, pre-wiring for speakers and projector now even if you don't get the opportunity for a while. Room length could support a bigger screen, but you'll run out of width pretty quickly if you go much bigger (no where to put front left/right speakers).

 

In our last house, we had data everywhere, x2 ports in each room, about 8 in an office, 6 in the home theatre and 2 for the living area TV again. I've dropped that back this time, but not by much, its cheap enough to run. Allow about 20m per connection, drum of cat6 is 300m, so you should be right for 15 connections or so from a single drum.

 

lots of decisions to be made, but only you know what works for you and your family and what your priorities are.

 

Its a great time building, especially if you accept at the start that things will happen and it'll likely cost more than you thought.




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  #2409474 29-Jan-2020 09:09
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Thanks again all. Sorry for posting in wrong section

 

 

 

They have said Mitsubishi MSZ GL60VGD R32 6.8KW would do it ($4600). I will ask about ducted heating as I was in doubt about heat getting to the bedrooms. 

 

As for the wiring I have a slight idea of what you mean, but still not exactly sure of whats involved and what I need it for etc. I need to learn about this before wiring convo comes up.

 

Garage isnt insulated so I might ask. To increase insulation around the house was about $1300, not sure if have budget for that.

 

Here is a list of inclusions in price

 

  • GENERAL Inclusions
  •  Fixed contract build time.
  •  Building Consent fees (excludes Resource Consent).
  •     Construction and liabil it y insurance.
  •     Master Builders guarantee.
  •     12 Month defect liability period.
  •  Full plans & draughting to council requirements.
  •     Engin eers footi ng & beam designs.
  •     Site specific soil report by independent engin eer.
  •  Waffle floor slab based on good ground 100KPA bearing capacit y.
  •     H1.2 90 x 45 kiln dried framing & trusses.
  •  25 Degree roof pitch.
  •  Pink Batts R2.6 insulati on to external walls & R3.6 insulati on to ceilin gs (excludes garage).
  •     2400mm ceili ng height.
  •  Premium Dulux paint in 4 whit e base colours.
  •  4 Hour colour consult ation.
  •  
  • EXTERNAL Inclusions
  •  Phone and power connection within 20m• from building plat form •Applicable provider connection fees not included
  •  Stor m water and foulwater drainage all owance (within 20m fr om building platform)
  •  Satin finish pressed metal tile roofing with angle trim.
  •  Coloursteel fascia and quad gutter.
  •  Double glazed aluminium doors & windows with double tongue catches where applicable
  •  SR9 powder coated entry door
  •  Dominator Futura sect ional garage door with 2 remotes, sized as per plan
  •  2 external garden taps
  • KITCHEN Inclusions
  •  
  •      Haier Oven HWO60S4MX1
  •      Haier Cooktop HCE604TB2
  •      Haier Rangehood.  HC90PLX4
  •     Haier Dishwasher HDW13G1X
  •      Methven Echo Minimalist goose neck sink mixer
  •      Tiled splashback behind cooktop.
  •     Kitchen to be designed as per specified PC sum value.
  • BATHROOM/ENSUITE Inclusions
  •  
  •      750mm white Clearlite St atesman si ngle draw wall hung or classic floor standing vanities. - upgraded to bigger vanity
  •      Methven Echo Glide tapware &: shower slide.
  •      Mirror 900mm high to length of vanities.
  •      Englefield Valencia Elite corner shower square (Sized as per plans)
  •      Englefield- Sorrento II bath .
  •      Caroma Venecia toil et suite with soft close lid .
  •      Caroma Cosmo toilet roll holder and towel rails.
  •      Vinyl planking to bathroom &: WC floor.
  • LAUNDRY Inclusions
  •     Rheem 180 litre mains pressure hot water system.
  •     Vinyl planking to floor (If not in garage).
  •     Aquatica Laundratubbie.
  •  
  •  
  • ELECTRICAL Inclusions
  •  1x fridge power point.
  •     1x dishwasher point.
  •     1x auto garage door power point (if applicable).
  •     Fibre optic smart silver system.
  •   18x double power points.
  •    25x recessed downlights.- LED
  •     2x external bulkhead lights.
  •     2x TV points.
  •     2x phone points.
  •     1x oven point.
  •     1x Rangehood point
  •     1x cooktop point.
  •     1x hot water system point.
  •     1x switchboard.
  •     1x meter box.
  •     1x submain meter board/switchboard.
  •     Smoke detectors as required.
  •  
  • OTHER Inclusions
  •     Vinyl planking to entry,kitchen and bathrooms as per plan.
  •     Quality carpet from builders express range. With 11mm underlay
  •     White melamine shelf and chrome rail to wardrobes.
  •     Skirting - 60 x 12mm MDF.
  •     Architraves - 40 x 12mm MDF.
  •     Cornice - 55mm gib cove.
  •     Windsor Futura lever type door hardware and satin chrome door stops.
  •     Winstone GIB Plasterboard walls and ceilings.
  •     Winstone GIB Aqualine to wet area walls and ceilings.
  •     All wallboard fixed horizontally as per GIB Winstone wallboards recommendations.
  •     House cleaned internally & externally.
  •     All rubbish removed from site.
  •     Quality, service and backup from New Zealand's favourite home builder.

 

 

Have asked for separate toilet ($2k) & increased stud height 2.7m in kitchen/dining/living ($2.5k). Here is my proposed plan 

 

Click to see full size


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  #2409492 29-Jan-2020 09:36
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Hmm I'm still worried that by the time you put in furniture and allow comfortable walking routes to access the family room & front door, there won't be room to swing a cat in that middle lounge area. It might be worth making some paper cut-outs to scale of the sort of furniture you want and try arranging them on your floor plan to see if it works. 


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  #2409502 29-Jan-2020 09:55
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How are you going to open the fridge in that corner? Corners have to be thought about really carefully in kitchens, they can be a huge waste of valuable space.

 

Also, remember the triangle workflow - sink/bench - cooktop - fridge.

 

If you are really worried about resale - talk to a kitchen designer - a badly laid out kitchen, no matter how big, will be worse than a small, easy to work in, kitchen. (Not saying yours is badly laid out, but I would want to get some opinions, even from the kitchen people at the hardware stores).

 

 

 

Exciting times for you though. Just make sure your living areas will be livable - build it for you, not a potential buyer somewhere down the track. Good Luck!


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  #2409504 29-Jan-2020 09:56
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1. I do not see a inclusion for storm water report which likely the council will ask for. This is separate from the soil report.

 

 

2. 180L hot water tank is very small. You will run out of hot water I would say quite often. Either go minimum 300L or gas califont system for unlimited hot water.

 

 

3. Electrical looks very very light. No external power points? 1 at back and 1 near the front of house minimum. 18 double power points is very low. Get 2 x double power point minimum in every bedroom. 2 x double power point to TV locations. 2 x double power point in pantry.




Do whatever you want to do man.

  

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  #2409507 29-Jan-2020 10:04
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33coupe:

 

Garage isnt insulated so I might ask. To increase insulation around the house was about $1300, not sure if have budget for that.

 

 

Take the option to increase the insulation!!!!!   especially in the walls, 

 

in a house like that its not too hard to get at roof insulation, ( its a bit of PITA, but it can be done by the owner, but once the gib goes on, the wall insulation become uneconomic to touch...

 

Even if you have to drop/delay something else, in the grand scheme of it,  $1300 on house insulation will pay it self back multiple times over the years... (


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  #2409529 29-Jan-2020 10:09
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33coupe:

 

Here is a list of inclusions in price

 

  •     2x TV points.
  •     2x phone points.

 

NO DATA CABLING/OUTLETS AT ALL..... GAWD spec builders are cheap and nasty....


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Geek


  #2409534 29-Jan-2020 10:22
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Hi there, just a few thoughts on the plans – it’s a bit of a jumble as can’t spare too much work time 😊

 

Looking at size of the entry - you can't fit a second door between it and the living room and still have a reasonably airy entrance to the house.  At 1500mm wide, by the time the front door is centred you've got a jumble of shoes of the floor, maybe coats hanging somewhere, art of the wall - it's going to be a fairly cramped space as it is. 

 

Make sure you have an element of glass in your front door, otherwise it's a cave with no light, can’t see who is at the door etc.

 

Family room - Where's the TV/furniture going?  Way too many doors/full height windows in there. Maybe ditch the double doors into living room? Have a full height cavity slider closer to the entry - track in the ceiling space.  Will mean there's a great open plan nature of the room when it's not closed off (which will probably most of the time), potentially gives a bit more wall space in living room (if wanting to hang tv off that wall build a second 70mm wall to suit.  Potentially ditch the 1330x1800 window and make it a 2150x900 to match others and doors, and shuffle it towards one of the corners of the room - by the sounds of it it's  in subdivision land, so it's probably only going to be looking at a timber fence or side of neighbours garage.

 

Bed 1 Walk in wardrobe – have you considered making that 100mm narrower?  It’s going to have basically 600mm shelf on one side, and nothing on the Ensuite wall and that would mean a 900mm wide space for getting in and out, for something that you spend 5 mins? A day in…  the extra 100mm in the Ensuite would make it more luxurious, possibly let you go up to a 900mm vanity rather than the 700/750(?) shown.  Possibly consider a 1x1m corner angled shower to make better use of space (some people hate the angled showers – I quite like them!)

 

 

 

Walk in pantry – have you considered dropping the cavity slider altogether? 

 

 

 

Kitchen – rather than having an island, push it up against the wall and have a peninsula, you’ve already got access into the kitchen via the other way, allows for more storage space.  Hard to tell from plans, but gap between island and other side of kitchen cabinets could possibly be reduced a bit.  Looks like about 1200 at the moment, could drop that down to 1000mm without too much trouble. 

 

 

 

Do you really need the wardrobe in Bedroom 4?  It’s an awkward space, and if not being used as a bedroom, limited need. Could extend hallway cupboard and walk in pantry to use that space, so still retaining it as storage. Will mean hallway becomes a bit of door central. 

 

 

 

Space to walk behind the couch from entry to rest of house, looking like a 5-600mm space behind the couch and garage wall.  Bit tight, and would leave you confused which was to go – squeeze through, or disrupt TV viewing?  At the moment can’t really shuffle couch forward as it would be in front of the one by the dining room, and if we tried to shuffle that one, it would be right in front of the 2150x600 window.  Then getting too close to the TV? Might not be space for the coffee table shown. 

 

 

 

Could possibly look at shuffling front door out a bit more – when someone knocks on the door, they’ll be standing surrounding by brick and it will be a dark space. 

 

 

 

Minimum brick panel width of 230mm – not sure you’ll get that on either side of the front door.  Could be if you had a 810 or 860 door, you could possibly squeeze in a 200mm wide window/sidelight and have it measured on site to go between brick on both sides – less fiddly and would look a bit better (and could mean you could have solid front door)

 

 

 

Move HWC into ceiling space?  Assuming a 25 degree pitch, there should be enough room up there. 

 

 

 

Have you thought about changing the cladding around the family room from brick to a weatherboard/plaster/something else?  Will give slightly more kerb appeal, and general appeal.

 

 

 

Did the designer give you any 3d views of the house?  Helps to gauge the relative sizes of the rooms with furniture in.

 

 

 

Bathroom – potentially look at moving the bath to be central on that outside wall?

 

 

 

Assuming there’s a pull down loft hatch access in the garage somewhere?

 

Not sure about rotating master bedroom bed around.  Not enough space for bedside cabinets? and you still look at bed up corridor.  My view would be that if people are in your house, they're either friends of family anyway. 

 

Depending on what your site coverage is, consider extending the soffit width outside the living and dining room to 1200 or 1800.  The roof truss designer should be able to get that to cantilever out without too much trouble, which would mean no posts/verandah beams to worry about. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rather odd how much comments come from a post asking about the kitchen!


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