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  Reply # 886724 29-Aug-2013 20:00
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I wonder if you can get some kind of sleeve or spacer.




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  Reply # 886754 29-Aug-2013 20:46
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Same here, our builder installed budget 120mm fittings. All non-budget fittings are 125mm or small. For me it is deciding between 12W Orbit which fits without cutting, or 18W Philips which actually cheaper but needs the hole cut larger with the risk of some of my fittings ending up not positioned symmetrical any more.




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  Reply # 886767 29-Aug-2013 21:40
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spacedog:
mattwnz:
MattR: I've just picked up two of the Viribright PAR38s for my driveway sensor light. That light is going off all night due to cats roaming around.

I've also replaced a couple of CA-rated downlights with IC-rated Orbit 12w LED fittings, so far so good - I've already noticed the room retaining heat better.
http://www.orbitlighting.co.nz/product-catalogue/indoor-lighting/led-indoor-lights/12w-int-led-dl-white-ww


Consumer did a review on LEDs, and I recall it saying that the viribright ones lost quite a lot of their intensity over time, went from 7 to 5 after 1000 hours, unlike other brands which didn't lose any. I will be interested to see the panasonic ones, but haven't seen any.
They also rated orbit lights, but they didn't rate that well, and didn't have a star next to the,. Not a fan of all on one fittings and bulbs, because of what do you do when one fails and that model no longer exists, do you end up with a fitting that doesn't match or do you have to replace them all so they match, plus having to rewire up a new one. You can get IC rated E27 downlighter fittings now which you can just install E27 LED bulbs, which I think is both cheaper and better in the long run, plus less waste.


What was the final verdict from review? I can't justify subscribing just to read that one article.  What did they say were the winners?



GE, Megaman (for dimable) and Verbatim were the 3 that got stars, but all were expensive to buy. They only reviewed 5 so very limited. It was also outdated, as they were reviewing their performance after 1000 hours, which meant they started reviewing them months ago. So they didn't review the new philips ones, and they said that there weren't any 75w equivalent ones, which philips now do produce one, which I think is a very good bulb with good colour for $25. They didn't review any of the type that are built into fittings, only standalone E27 and B22 type bulbs which go in existing fittings. 


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  Reply # 886773 29-Aug-2013 22:09
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hangon:
mattwnz:You can get IC rated E27 downlighter fittings now.


Any recommendation or links? Thanks.


Halcyon sell one for energy saver bulbs on their website.

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  Reply # 886781 29-Aug-2013 22:42
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I bought 40 led bulbs from china, gave them to friends and installed a few in our house, This was 6 months ago, I have not heard of one of them failing. They were 11w, in my view about the same as a 75w bulb but as has been said before, you get one colour of light, it's also like a fluorescent, you get a bit of light 50 times a second, nothing like an old filament. I'd say for the moment the best stratergy would be to use them where the light is switched on and off on a regular basis and also due to their longevity use them where access is difficult, eg the one mounted on the staircase.  There are actually a number of different designs, large panels, port lights, the chinese now constantly send me emails with new designs and configurations. Overall, not the best for reading but great for power consumption and they seem to last for a very long time 

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  Reply # 886790 29-Aug-2013 23:40
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If they flicker with the ac input then they are driverless ones. Makes them useless for most situations. As its the driver which dies in most cheap led lamps its a good way to reduce their failure rate. I wouldn't have a flickering light where I had to see it. Ugh headaches.




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  Reply # 886796 30-Aug-2013 00:53
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turnin: I bought 40 led bulbs from china, gave them to friends and installed a few in our house, This was 6 months ago, I have not heard of one of them failing. They were 11w, in my view about the same as a 75w bulb but as has been said before, you get one colour of light, it's also like a fluorescent, you get a bit of light 50 times a second, nothing like an old filament. I'd say for the moment the best stratergy would be to use them where the light is switched on and off on a regular basis and also due to their longevity use them where access is difficult, eg the one mounted on the staircase.  There are actually a number of different designs, large panels, port lights, the chinese now constantly send me emails with new designs and configurations. Overall, not the best for reading but great for power consumption and they seem to last for a very long time 


11 watt would be more like a 60 watt. 13-15 watt would be closer to 75 watt. But really it is the lumen output that matters, and a 75 watt equiv would be over 1000 lumen.

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  Reply # 891756 8-Sep-2013 19:52
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New LED downlight from superlux catalogs. IC rated and fully enclosed.



"Diffuser optimised"

LDL100-WH 5.5W, 455 lumens, but claims 90% of lights output are directed downwards compare to old downlights only 30%~60%, and that it's similar to 75W output from a SD100 downlight.

LDL125-WH, 8W, 632 lumens, claims similar to 100W.

also a LDL80-WH, 3.5W, 277 lumens, claims similar to 35W.

Anyone tried these?

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  Reply # 891757 8-Sep-2013 20:00
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Dimmable? Anything other than orange available?




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  Reply # 891761 8-Sep-2013 20:17
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Those Superlux fittings appear to be all non-dimmable (some broken links on web site).

Today at Bunnings Pakuranga (Auckland) I saw a pallet load of Philips 13W globes for $24 each. All warm white, no surprise, but 50/50 mix of BC and ES.

BTW, for us warm white is ideal as our walls are painted arctic white.

I've ordered one of these to trial as it fits my 120mm holes, will feedback when installed:
http://www.qualityledlighting.co.nz/gallery/Slimline%2BRange/slimline-12w/276407




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  Reply # 891763 8-Sep-2013 20:21
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My bunnings has the 24 in whatever they put blue on the box for (I assume its not daylight) but only in ES, and I have a whole lot of old BC batten holders I want to put LED into.

If ES batten holders were not so insanely priced the solution would be simple, but stuffed if I am paying $17 for a batten holder vs $4 for BC.




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  Reply # 908331 5-Oct-2013 09:35
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This morning in Countdown Pakuranga I saw they have upped the price of Philips bulbs to $30 while introducing Panasonic 5W 350lm @ $16, 8W 600lm @ $20, and 10W 800lm @ $25. It is available in both warm and cool white, and both screw and bayonet. It is a very narrow bulb about the dimensions of a normal glass bulb. Non-dimmable and the colour temperature is not advertised so they can't be held accountable for batch variation, but the price is reasonable and it is a brand name.




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  Reply # 908417 5-Oct-2013 12:56
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Is it really a cool white? Many brands seem to use it interchangably with daylight, which is IMO too blue for normal use in most situations.




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  Reply # 908509 5-Oct-2013 16:23
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It's frustrating they only want to make good BC LEDs at 2700k. The 13 watt Philips is available at 6500k and 2700k for ES but only 2700k for BC.

New World should still have the Philips 13w for $13.

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  Reply # 908510 5-Oct-2013 16:25
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Its also annoying they only do the 2 extremes, where are the 4000 and 5000k lamps?

If BC battenholders were not so damn expensive I would just change them all out to get the cheaper lamps




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