Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.




1496 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 191

Trusted

Topic # 98641 3-Mar-2012 08:45
Send private message

We've just put a desk in my sons room and unfortunately theres no electrical socket on that side of the room. Im interested to see if anyone has recently had a new electrical socket wired/installed. Roughly how much would I be looking at? Just trying to gauge the expense before I start ringing sparkies.

Not sure if it complicates things but the house is a Lockwood. Although Im not looking for anthing fancy with the wiring as the wall backs onto a cupboard (so Im happy to have the wires channeled up through the cupboard in those plastic wire runner things).

If its going to be expensive then I guess I just stick with messy extension cords for now.

Thanks

View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2
1632 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 277

Subscriber

  Reply # 589681 3-Mar-2012 09:00
Send private message

Ask for quotes on builderscrack.co.nz. If your happy with the channel approach it will be faster to implement so cheaper.

27279 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6709

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 589684 3-Mar-2012 09:05
Send private message

Realistically somewhere in the region of $200 purely as a ballpark figure.


 
 
 
 


1609 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 343

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 589690 3-Mar-2012 09:29
Send private message

tchart: We've just put a desk in my sons room and unfortunately theres no electrical socket on that side of the room. Im interested to see if anyone has recently had a new electrical socket wired/installed. Roughly how much would I be looking at? Just trying to gauge the expense before I start ringing sparkies.

Not sure if it complicates things but the house is a Lockwood. Although Im not looking for anthing fancy with the wiring as the wall backs onto a cupboard (so Im happy to have the wires channeled up through the cupboard in those plastic wire runner things).

If its going to be expensive then I guess I just stick with messy extension cords for now.

Thanks   



It's kind of hard to figure out a price, so many different factors, is there access under the house?, is there another power point on the other side of the wall? (in the room next to it), will a new circuit be required (this will most likely require an installation of an RCD type circuit breaker). Generally lockwood houses are a PITA to do additional wiring to.


It's a bit like ringing a panel beater....i've just crashed my car how much to fix? someone really needs to look at it and make an informed decision.

To be honest, if it's a back to back installation, the $100 is a good starting point, anything other than that $200 and up

4975 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 105

Trusted

  Reply # 589728 3-Mar-2012 10:16
Send private message

No real idea about the price but if you're going to have a sparky open up the wall and install an outlet, see what the marginal cost is to run some CAT5/6 cable to the same place and go back to where your router/switch is. Though wireless is okay, you can't beat a hard wired ethernet connection.




System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


My Google+ page 

 

 

 

https://plus.google.com/+laurencechiu

 

 




1496 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 191

Trusted

  Reply # 590380 5-Mar-2012 07:52
Send private message

Thanks for the replies guys, yeah I realise its never the same. Around $200 is what I would expect. Anything more and I will just accept the untidy cables. I'll ring around and get someone to come and look.

3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 590872 5-Mar-2012 20:33
Send private message

While building a new house with open walls it is about $70 + GST per double socket. Getting someone to come out for just 1 socket with closed walls so they need to use one of those long auger drill bits and find another socket to wire to (you cannot just cut into a wire, no joints allowed) I would guess towards $300 rather than $200. From memory running a new circuit for an aircon/spa is over $500, which is why we got our builder to pre-wire the aircon power and install an outdoor socket.




You can never have enough Volvos!


3684 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1392

Subscriber

  Reply # 590891 5-Mar-2012 21:17
Send private message

A PDL power point is about $15, which will be about $20 to you (depending on mark up). 2.5mm twin + earth is around $1.60/m so around $2.10 to you. And then anywhere between $60 - $80 /hour for your sparky's labour. If there is underfloor access and another point close I wouldn't estimate an hour to run the cable (at the most) and then another hour to fit everything off (at the most). so lets add up....
$20 - power point
$20 - 10m 2.5mm twin + earth
$120 labour (at the cheapest)
$160 total

So around $200 for a best case scenario job.

908 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 44

Subscriber

  Reply # 590954 5-Mar-2012 22:47
Send private message

chevrolux: A PDL power point is about $15, which will be about $20 to you (depending on mark up). 2.5mm twin + earth is around $1.60/m so around $2.10 to you. And then anywhere between $60 - $80 /hour for your sparky's labour. If there is underfloor access and another point close I wouldn't estimate an hour to run the cable (at the most) and then another hour to fit everything off (at the most). so lets add up....
$20 - power point
$20 - 10m 2.5mm twin + earth
$120 labour (at the cheapest)
$160 total

So around $200 for a best case scenario job.


You would need to add an RCD to the list(if none already fitted to switch board), also a charge for the COC(that the sparky should issue on completion).

258 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 8

Technical Solutions Aust

  Reply # 591141 6-Mar-2012 11:47
Send private message

RCD is mandatory, and they can be expensive depending on whether they install and RCD socket (expensive) or an RCBO in the switchboard to replace the existing circuit protection with an RCD/overload breaker.

Electrical CoC's cost $6 to procure and about 5 minutes to fill out. The electrical tests the electrician would have to perform for the CoC are mandatory and in this case should take about 10-15 minutes to complete.

I think $200 is too light in this instance - leaning towards $300

1609 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 343

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 591349 6-Mar-2012 17:08
Send private message

Evilg: RCD is mandatory, and they can be expensive depending on whether they install and RCD socket (expensive) or an RCBO in the switchboard to replace the existing circuit protection with an RCD/overload breaker.



It depends on the suitation, if a new circuit has to be run the it needs RCD protection, if you are connecting to an existing circuit no RCD required.



3267 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 77

Trusted

  Reply # 591358 6-Mar-2012 17:26
Send private message

In my old house we had 3 power circuits, 10A each with small fuse holders which did not take plug-in circuit breakers. The 3 circuits were 1 for the laundry, 1 for the 2 bedrooms, and 1 for the kitchen and living room together (!) which were 2 separate rooms. Could run only one of the kettle, microwave, toaster, or heater at a time. This is a bit extreme, but I would rather tell someone to budget a bit more instead of (say) under $200. It will also be expensive if the install is on an outside wall of a modern insulated home.

So depending on what needs to be done to get a plug installed, perhaps just buy an extension lead for $10.




You can never have enough Volvos!


908 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 44

Subscriber

  Reply # 591410 6-Mar-2012 20:21
Send private message

gregmcc:
Evilg: RCD is mandatory, and they can be expensive depending on whether they install and RCD socket (expensive) or an RCBO in the switchboard to replace the existing circuit protection with an RCD/overload breaker.



It depends on the suitation, if a new circuit has to be run the it needs RCD protection, if you are connecting to an existing circuit no RCD required.




My understanding is if a new power outlet is installed it must have RCD protection. 

1609 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 343

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 591418 6-Mar-2012 20:35
Send private message

andrewcnz:
gregmcc:
Evilg: RCD is mandatory, and they can be expensive depending on whether they install and RCD socket (expensive) or an RCBO in the switchboard to replace the existing circuit protection with an RCD/overload breaker.



It depends on the suitation, if a new circuit has to be run the it needs RCD protection, if you are connecting to an existing circuit no RCD required.




My understanding is if a new power outlet is installed it must have RCD protection. 



It depends on the suitation.

There are quite a few factors that govern RCD requirnments, without specefic knowledge of the exact suitation it's hard to say for sure

27279 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6709

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 591477 7-Mar-2012 06:21
Send private message

andrewcnz:
gregmcc:
Evilg: RCD is mandatory, and they can be expensive depending on whether they install and RCD socket (expensive) or an RCBO in the switchboard to replace the existing circuit protection with an RCD/overload breaker.



It depends on the suitation, if a new circuit has to be run the it needs RCD protection, if you are connecting to an existing circuit no RCD required.




My understanding is if a new power outlet is installed it must have RCD protection. 


As mentioned above it depends on the situation. Many of these situations are also descibed above.

In a very broad genalisation if the socket is connected to an existing circuit no RCD is typically required unless it's being fitted in a risky or wet area. If a new circuit is required a RCD is required.


257 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 27


  Reply # 591504 7-Mar-2012 09:01
Send private message

 We just had a external power point  put on a Lockwood House this backed onto a existing power point  but needed an additional RCD. and put 2 additional power points onto an existing circuit in the Garage and replaced a light fitting in the Lounge. Total bill came to $453.00 Can't give you a Breakdown though

 1 | 2
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.