Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | ... | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | ... | 70
429 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 202


  Reply # 1476666 22-Jan-2016 11:11
Send private message

What about customers in NZ using an unblocking service with their region set to NZ? I switched to NZ last week to see the catalogue and started watching Making a Murderer. I haven't switched 'back' to another region yet, so does Netflix see me as a 'geo-pirate' or is it ok if I am viewing my 'home' catalogue?


Glurp
7573 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3541

Subscriber

  Reply # 1476691 22-Jan-2016 11:43
One person supports this post
Send private message

Why can't local distributors maintain two or more catalogs side by side? There would be the Netflix NZ catalog, but also the US one for an extra fee. I don't see why it always has to be an all or nothing deal. Also, I don't see why the overseas catalog would necessarily have to be sold by any particular distributor. Maybe it could be offered to the highest bidder, with the only restriction being that the bidder has to be operating within the boundaries of the country it is bidding from. So Netflix, along with other distributors, would bid on the overseas catalog rights and Sky might end up with them while Netflix continues to operate the NZ catalog. Other overseas content producers, like BBC, could do the same, with the local distributor acting as an agent. 

 

For me, and I think for a lot of people, the issue is not getting content for free, but getting freedom of choice. The things I want to watch just are not available here, at any price. Yet I know they are available elsewhere. This is what motivates geo-unblocking in the first place.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


12601 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5913

Trusted

  Reply # 1476697 22-Jan-2016 11:56
One person supports this post
Send private message

What I would like to see in light of free trade agreements and globalisation is one catalogue and no geoblocking but that is up to the owners to agree on and the Networks to pay the appropriate fee. Those two bodies should

 

be free to negotiate this.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


2230 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 623


  Reply # 1476699 22-Jan-2016 11:57
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

Why can't local distributors maintain two or more catalogs side by side? There would be the Netflix NZ catalog, but also the US one for an extra fee. I don't see why it always has to be an all or nothing deal. Also, I don't see why the overseas catalog would necessarily have to be sold by any particular distributor. Maybe it could be offered to the highest bidder, with the only restriction being that the bidder has to be operating within the boundaries of the country it is bidding from. So Netflix, along with other distributors, would bid on the overseas catalog rights and Sky might end up with them while Netflix continues to operate the NZ catalog. Other overseas content producers, like BBC, could do the same, with the local distributor acting as an agent. 

 

For me, and I think for a lot of people, the issue is not getting content for free, but getting freedom of choice. The things I want to watch just are not available here, at any price. Yet I know they are available elsewhere. This is what motivates geo-unblocking in the first place.

 

 

 

The catalogs aren't bought or sold as a single commodity. Netflix US catalog is made up of everything that Netflix has purchased individually for that region. That's my understanding anyway.


2230 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 623


  Reply # 1476702 22-Jan-2016 12:04
Send private message

MikeB4:

 

What I would like to see in light of free trade agreements and globalisation is one catalogue and no geoblocking but that is up to the owners to agree on and the Networks to pay the appropriate fee. Those two bodies should

 

be free to negotiate this.

 

 

That would be the ideal for many (including myself), but how would the extra costs of a global license be passed onto the consumer? Customers in the USA would say a price increase is unfair as they are already getting pretty much everything already. Then many non-US customers might say they don't want to be forced to pay more, even if it does mean more content - for some the current local catalog might be all they need.


12601 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5913

Trusted

  Reply # 1476705 22-Jan-2016 12:08
One person supports this post
Send private message

Paul1977:

 

MikeB4:

 

What I would like to see in light of free trade agreements and globalisation is one catalogue and no geoblocking but that is up to the owners to agree on and the Networks to pay the appropriate fee. Those two bodies should

 

be free to negotiate this.

 

 

That would be the ideal for many (including myself), but how would the extra costs of a global license be passed onto the consumer? Customers in the USA would say a price increase is unfair as they are already getting pretty much everything already. Then many non-US customers might say they don't want to be forced to pay more, even if it does mean more content - for some the current local catalog might be all they need.

 

 

 

 

That will be up the providers to determine what the best acceptable price will be in their markets. I would think it logical that those outside the US would pay more for a greater selection without having

 

to pay the monthly fee to a unblocking service.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


6434 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1571


  Reply # 1476708 22-Jan-2016 12:08
Send private message

Paul1977:

 

Rikkitic:

 

Why can't local distributors maintain two or more catalogs side by side? There would be the Netflix NZ catalog, but also the US one for an extra fee. I don't see why it always has to be an all or nothing deal. Also, I don't see why the overseas catalog would necessarily have to be sold by any particular distributor. Maybe it could be offered to the highest bidder, with the only restriction being that the bidder has to be operating within the boundaries of the country it is bidding from. So Netflix, along with other distributors, would bid on the overseas catalog rights and Sky might end up with them while Netflix continues to operate the NZ catalog. Other overseas content producers, like BBC, could do the same, with the local distributor acting as an agent. 

 

For me, and I think for a lot of people, the issue is not getting content for free, but getting freedom of choice. The things I want to watch just are not available here, at any price. Yet I know they are available elsewhere. This is what motivates geo-unblocking in the first place.

 

 

 

The catalogs aren't bought or sold as a single commodity. Netflix US catalog is made up of everything that Netflix has purchased individually for that region. That's my understanding anyway.

 

 

 

 

it's a bit of both.

 

 

 

Netflix will go to, say, Sony Pictures, and Sony will offer a particular catalogue of their content which will include a bunch of good stuff and heaps of crud, and it will cost s flat fee (e.g. $100m/year) last for a certain period (e.g. 3 years).  Netflix will have to buy it all, or take nothing.

 

It may or may not include anything new that Sony releases during that period, or they might need to pay extra for that.

 

They then go around other studios and the cycle happens again.

 

 

 

So generally speaking Netflix can't cherry pick individual shows they like, they have to buy them as a bundle (which is one reason why there is so much absolute garbage on Netflix as well as the good stuff).

 

Each studio is different though. and TV is very different from Movies.


jmh

449 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 142

Subscriber

  Reply # 1476727 22-Jan-2016 12:10
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

For me, and I think for a lot of people, the issue is not getting content for free, but getting freedom of choice. The things I want to watch just are not available here, at any price. Yet I know they are available elsewhere. This is what motivates geo-unblocking in the first place.

 

 

 

 

 

Same for me.  I'm happy to pay for what I use so long as I don't have to sit through wall-to-wall advertising.


2230 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 623


  Reply # 1476740 22-Jan-2016 12:18
Send private message

MikeB4:

 

Paul1977:

 

MikeB4:

 

What I would like to see in light of free trade agreements and globalisation is one catalogue and no geoblocking but that is up to the owners to agree on and the Networks to pay the appropriate fee. Those two bodies should

 

be free to negotiate this.

 

 

That would be the ideal for many (including myself), but how would the extra costs of a global license be passed onto the consumer? Customers in the USA would say a price increase is unfair as they are already getting pretty much everything already. Then many non-US customers might say they don't want to be forced to pay more, even if it does mean more content - for some the current local catalog might be all they need.

 

 

 

 

That will be up the providers to determine what the best acceptable price will be in their markets. I would think it logical that those outside the US would pay more for a greater selection without having

 

to pay the monthly fee to a unblocking service.

 

 

I agree that it makes sense for those outside the USA to pay more for the extra content. I'm just not sure that everyone would like it forced on them, there will be a lot of Netflix NZ users who have no idea what geounblocking is and are quite happy with the selection they currently get for $12.99.

 

It reminds be of when 2Degrees bought Snap and increased the VoIP price from $10 to $15 and justified it by give free national calling (which heaps of people didn't want or need).

 

People are funny. If Netflix had debuted in NZ with a global catalog for $25, people probably would have jumped on it. But after having it for a while at $12.99, I bet even increasing it to just $20 (but with more content) will annoy people.

 

Obviously a far more complicated licensing model; but I think the consumer would rather have the option of paying more for a larger catalog, but not have to if they don't want.

 

On the other hand I could be completely wrong about that.


1297 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 165


  Reply # 1476741 22-Jan-2016 12:19
Send private message

NonprayingMantis:

 

Paul1977:

 

Rikkitic:

 

Why can't local distributors maintain two or more catalogs side by side? There would be the Netflix NZ catalog, but also the US one for an extra fee. I don't see why it always has to be an all or nothing deal. Also, I don't see why the overseas catalog would necessarily have to be sold by any particular distributor. Maybe it could be offered to the highest bidder, with the only restriction being that the bidder has to be operating within the boundaries of the country it is bidding from. So Netflix, along with other distributors, would bid on the overseas catalog rights and Sky might end up with them while Netflix continues to operate the NZ catalog. Other overseas content producers, like BBC, could do the same, with the local distributor acting as an agent. 

 

For me, and I think for a lot of people, the issue is not getting content for free, but getting freedom of choice. The things I want to watch just are not available here, at any price. Yet I know they are available elsewhere. This is what motivates geo-unblocking in the first place.

 

 

 

The catalogs aren't bought or sold as a single commodity. Netflix US catalog is made up of everything that Netflix has purchased individually for that region. That's my understanding anyway.

 

 

 

 

it's a bit of both.

 

 

 

Netflix will go to, say, Sony Pictures, and Sony will offer a particular catalogue of their content which will include a bunch of good stuff and heaps of crud, and it will last for a certian period (e.g. 3 years).  Netflix will have to buy it all, or take nothing. It may or may not include anything new that Sony releases during that period, or they might need to pay extra for that.

 

They then go around other studios and the cycle happens again.

 

So generally speaking Netflix can't cherry pick individual shows they like, they have to buy them as a bundle.

 

Each studio is different though. and TV is very different from Movies.

 

 

Netflix have said that Disney was the last big output deal that they'll do.  Henceforth it will be buying individual shows on their merits.  

 

Its similar in NZ.  Big output deals like TVNZ has with ABC/Disney may be a thing of the past.  Mediaworks relinquished its FOX output deal which is why some new Fox shows have come back to TVNZ.  Like The Simpsons.  As the rights come up for offer the networks can pick and choose.  Likewise BBC stuff.  Why TopGear moved around.  

 

Now it is very much an individual show basis but the pricing in some markets may not suit the buyer depending on either the demographic, the economics (cost-per-thousand viewers etc) or other factors.  It may be down to something like legacy output deals.  Some good examples:  Shadow Hunters.  Netflix has global rights excluding the US.  Daredevil (which would have been an ABC-Disney and landed with TVNZ c/legacy) is a Netflix global.  Willing to pay the exclusivity price to get it.  Better Call Saul - Lightbox buys it exclusively to help assemble its catalogue.

 

The analog corollary would be the humble video store that decided which titles it did and didnt want to stock.  And those titles that it wanted exclusively for its chain.  You build a catalog - you dont buy it unless you're the second owner and the first owner sold it or went bust. 


gzt

9929 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1493


  Reply # 1476749 22-Jan-2016 12:27
Send private message

Netflix would be pretty happy with a global licensing model because then Netflix would then set regional prices to their hearts content and profit.

1297 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 165


  Reply # 1476773 22-Jan-2016 12:41
One person supports this post
Send private message

gzt: Netflix would be pretty happy with a global licensing model because then Netflix would then set regional prices to their hearts content and profit.

 

But a willing buyer needs a willing seller.  

 

Besides why buy global and sell global when you can buy local and sell global - even more profit.  (but shhhh dont tell anyone).  


12541 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2222

Trusted

  Reply # 1476781 22-Jan-2016 12:49
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

Why can't local distributors maintain two or more catalogs side by side? There would be the Netflix NZ catalog, but also the US one for an extra fee. I don't see why it always has to be an all or nothing deal. Also, I don't see why the overseas catalog would necessarily have to be sold by any particular distributor. Maybe it could be offered to the highest bidder, with the only restriction being that the bidder has to be operating within the boundaries of the country it is bidding from. So Netflix, along with other distributors, would bid on the overseas catalog rights and Sky might end up with them while Netflix continues to operate the NZ catalog. Other overseas content producers, like BBC, could do the same, with the local distributor acting as an agent. 

 

For me, and I think for a lot of people, the issue is not getting content for free, but getting freedom of choice. The things I want to watch just are not available here, at any price. Yet I know they are available elsewhere. This is what motivates geo-unblocking in the first place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

That is the key.

 

 

 

Take Netflix's own content. They can sell it here under Netflix NZ, or sell it to a distributor here. It's here, thats all that matters

 

Other content would be bought. Maybe by Netflix NZ, Lightbox, Neon. It would be here.

 

Depending on your tastes, you might have one or more of the services, but all the content that is available globally, is avaliable here

 

Would this keep everyone happy? All the contect is here and geoblock bypassing is not needed


2612 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 604

Trusted

  Reply # 1476788 22-Jan-2016 12:59
Send private message

tdgeek:

 

Would this keep everyone happy? All the contect is here and geoblock bypassing is not needed

 

 

It all depends on whether it is offered at a reasonable price, or if price gouging tactics are used.

 

A perfect example of this is Game of Thrones. If you want to watch it in HD, in a timely manner, you need to have a Sky Basic package ($49.22), SOHO ($9.99), HD access ticket ($9.99). A grand total of $69.20. And that's not factoring in the cost for the MySky HDi box (which I believe may be required for HD content). Considering we're not actually interested in any other Sky content, that's a very poor deal for us.

 

You can watch in on Neon, but for some inexplicable reason that is only in SD. Or you can wait a year and get the Blu-Ray. But you better stay away from the Internet for 12 months, unless you don't mind spoilers.

 

Instead we pay USD $15 per month to watch it via HBO Now. 


2165 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 357


  Reply # 1476792 22-Jan-2016 13:04
Send private message

As a consumer, how much extra per month would you deem acceptable to pay for a global NF library? I think we all agree it could happen but I doubt content owners will not be prepared to take a cut in revenue so would become a lot more costly for NF which would have to be passed onto the consumer one way or another

 

The argument regarding people in the US shouldn't have to pay a premium is irrelevant as there is plenty of content available in other regions that is not available in US so they stand to gain as well

 

I consider that if i could move the cost of Unotelly across to NF as a premium it would be status quo cost-wise, but would a 30% increase in cost be acceptable to the masses or more importantly cover the global cost for content? I'm guessing probably not


1 | ... | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | ... | 70
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central launches
Posted 10-Jul-2018 10:40


Spark completes first milestone in voice platform upgrade
Posted 10-Jul-2018 09:36


Microsoft ices heated developers
Posted 6-Jul-2018 20:16


PB Technologies charged for its extended warranties and warned for bait advertising
Posted 3-Jul-2018 15:45


Almost 20,000 people claim credits from Spark
Posted 29-Jun-2018 10:40


Cove sells NZ's first insurance policy via chatbot
Posted 25-Jun-2018 10:04


N4L helping TAKA Trust bridge the digital divide for Lower Hutt students
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:08


Winners Announced for 2018 CIO Awards
Posted 18-Jun-2018 13:03


Logitech Rally sets new standard for USB-connected video conference cameras
Posted 18-Jun-2018 09:27


Russell Stanners steps down as Vodafone NZ CEO
Posted 12-Jun-2018 09:13


Intergen recognised as 2018 Microsoft Country Partner of the Year for New Zealand
Posted 12-Jun-2018 08:00


Finalists Announced For Microsoft NZ Partner Awards
Posted 6-Jun-2018 15:12


Vocus Group and Vodafone announce joint venture to accelerate fibre innovation
Posted 5-Jun-2018 10:52


Kogan.com to launch Kogan Mobile in New Zealand
Posted 4-Jun-2018 14:34


Enable doubles fibre broadband speeds for its most popular wholesale service in Christchurch
Posted 2-Jun-2018 20:07



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.