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michaelmurfy
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  #1472342 16-Jan-2016 00:45
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watsonash: my suspicion is that Netflix will simply move to verify the location by forcing lookups to Google DNS and possibly OpenDNS servers.
Historically this was the case with the chromecast and the solution on this was previously to block the DNS to both google DNS and OpenDNS servers, the applicaiton would then fallback to whatever the DNS was set to on the device itself.

I have a public DNS group defined as this;
    group {
        address-group PublicDNS {
            address 8.8.8.8
            address 8.8.4.4
            address 209.244.0.3
            address 209.244.0.4
            address 208.67.222.222
            address 208.67.222.220
        }

<snip>

 

Just for your reference I have published a few shell scripts and an unblocking tutorial for the Ubiquiti Edgerouter Lite (as well as a few other routers) here: http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=151&topicid=171173

I am using host file redirection + DNS redirection (to my ER's dnsmasq server) and have a few dirty shell scripts to do the dirty with grabbing the latest dnsmasq file from dns4me. It also wouldn't surprise me if Netflix sign up accounts with these unblocking providers, does some research on where the traffic comes from and outright block them or block the IP ranges they use on a regular basis.

I've got many private servers in the US so could always do a L7 filter myself to pass Netflix through one of my VPS boxen. Like you say, we're smart and will get around it regardless. I always see people having problems when blocking Google DNS (instead of doing a redirect) so this to a degree is already happening. The correct and only solution to get around this is to use + do a DNS redirection to make whatever app, computer, web browser etc you use think it is in-fact using the right IP to contact the service via means of DNS redirection.

For example doing "dig @8.8.8.8 a netflix.com" generates the same IP as a dig on my ISP's DNS or routers DNS server or even a site that doesn't have a public DNS resolver, my devices know no better and have no way of verification either.




Michael Murphy | https://murfy.nz
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MediaLight
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  #1472344 16-Jan-2016 00:56
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Just putting my 2 cents in i believe they have to say this to keep their content partner agreements happy.

But it will be a slow move forward and DNS providers will be even quicker to keep their subscribers.

However if netflix start to block via the location of the credit card registered to pay for subscriptions this could be an issue...however Netflix makes too much money off people to go risking this.

I say we will be fine...or should i say the geeks out there will be, maybe just the average joe that will suffer.

michaelmurfy
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  #1472345 16-Jan-2016 01:08
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MediaLight: Just putting my 2 cents in i believe they have to say this to keep their content partner agreements happy.

But it will be a slow move forward and DNS providers will be even quicker to keep their subscribers.

However if netflix start to block via the location of the credit card registered to pay for subscriptions this could be an issue...however Netflix makes too much money off people to go risking this.

I say we will be fine...or should i say the geeks out there will be, maybe just the average joe that will suffer.


Protip - Air NZ onesmart card ;)




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MediaLight
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  #1472347 16-Jan-2016 01:09
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michaelmurfy:
MediaLight: Just putting my 2 cents in i believe they have to say this to keep their content partner agreements happy.

But it will be a slow move forward and DNS providers will be even quicker to keep their subscribers.

However if netflix start to block via the location of the credit card registered to pay for subscriptions this could be an issue...however Netflix makes too much money off people to go risking this.

I say we will be fine...or should i say the geeks out there will be, maybe just the average joe that will suffer.


Protip - Air NZ onesmart card ;)



agreed!

UnoTellyService
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  #1472376 16-Jan-2016 08:20
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Hello everybody!

UnoTelly users who are concerned about Netflix, you can check our statement about this incident at: http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=151&topicid=190907

Best regards,
UnoTelly Team

asjohnstone
76 posts

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  #1472379 16-Jan-2016 08:28
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Oriphix: 
If only they can sort out the licensing and offer the TV shows the same day / week the it releases in the US that would be awesome. I think they are trying to do that.
 


Don't forget what that means is for them to kill all local content resellers, in NZ that would mean Sky etc.

Only if they have a monopoly on content purchase can they do this. The content creators obviously love the current model as it generates higher prices for them due to competition.

These people aren't going to go quietly into the night 

ockel
1980 posts

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  #1472384 16-Jan-2016 08:37
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asjohnstone:
Oriphix: 
If only they can sort out the licensing and offer the TV shows the same day / week the it releases in the US that would be awesome. I think they are trying to do that.
 


Don't forget what that means is for them to kill all local content resellers, in NZ that would mean Sky etc.

Only if they have a monopoly on content purchase can they do this. The content creators obviously love the current model as it generates higher prices for them due to competition.

These people aren't going to go quietly into the night 


And Lightbox & Quickflix.  It'd mean the end of Lightbox quicker than you know given its all TV and no movies.

If Netflix were serious about the global model why dont they approach the current local rights holders and buy the rights off them?  Unless the studios have a veto right it'd be easier to acquire locally if the studios dont want to sell.....




Sixth Labour Government - "Vision without Execution is just Hallucination" 




ockel
1980 posts

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  #1472398 16-Jan-2016 08:43
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MediaLight: Just putting my 2 cents in i believe they have to say this to keep their content partner agreements happy.

But it will be a slow move forward and DNS providers will be even quicker to keep their subscribers.

However if netflix start to block via the location of the credit card registered to pay for subscriptions this could be an issue...however Netflix makes too much money off people to go risking this.

I say we will be fine...or should i say the geeks out there will be, maybe just the average joe that will suffer.


If Netflix were really serious instead of this half hearted effort then surely we'd see a repeat of the HBONow threats:

 

"Dear HBO NOW User: It has come to our attention that you may have signed up for and viewed video content on the HBO NOW streaming service from outside of the authorized service area (the United States, including D.C. and certain US territories). We would like to take this opportunity to remind you that the HBO NOW streaming service is only available to residents of the United States, for use within the United States. Any other access is prohibited by our Terms of Use. If you feel that you have received this message in error, and that you have both met the eligibility requirements for HBO NOW and have been using the service within the United States, please call us at 1-855-366-2183. If we do not hear from you by April 21, we will proceed with deactivating your HBO NOW account without further notice to you. Please note that it is your responsibility to cancel any automatic billing with your Subscription Provider to avoid incurring charges for any future months."

what ever happened to that anyway???  http://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=151&topicid=171148&page_no=5

And with the actual and threat of account deactivation of streaming from Netflix it might make life difficult for the subscriber but Netflix illustrates to the content providers that they mean business.  Not kinda-mean-business as they'd currently saying.
Of course driving users to piracy over streaming increases Netflix's ability to negotiate with the content providers.......   short term pain for Netflix, long term gain as a global content monopoly.  




Sixth Labour Government - "Vision without Execution is just Hallucination" 


code15
198 posts

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  #1472408 16-Jan-2016 09:42
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Doesn't anyone else think that Netflix (and rights holders) are completely entitled to do this? We pay $13 a month to access content that Netflix has purchased rights for in our country. That small fee shouldnt give us access to virtually any TV show/movie we want to stream.

Now if someone was paying for both an NZ account and a US account, and needed to unblock acces to US Netflix that's a different story. But I bet no one is in that category.

psychnurse
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  #1472409 16-Jan-2016 09:50
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code15: Doesn't anyone else think that Netflix (and rights holders) are completely entitled to do this? We pay $13 a month to access content that Netflix has purchased rights for in our country. That small fee shouldnt give us access to virtually any TV show/movie we want to stream.

Now if someone was paying for both an NZ account and a US account, and needed to unblock acces to US Netflix that's a different story. But I bet no one is in that category.


I like this analogy
Not my work but sourced from eye on demand

"It’s not terribly different to a customer who wants to buy a smart phone, but there’s only one brand of smart phone available in one shop in their town (If this sounds too impossible to imagine, bear with me). Perhaps that shop paid for the exclusive rights to sell phones in that town, and so the customer has no choice. But the next city along has more choice, so the consumer makes some form of effort to buy from further afield. Maybe they drove there, or asked a friend to buy one and send it back, or perhaps they just bought it off the Internet."

Stu

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  #1472410 16-Jan-2016 09:54
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If Netflix had systems in place to allow multiple subscriptions per account, then that wouldn't be a problem. They don't.




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ockel
1980 posts

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  #1472414 16-Jan-2016 10:06
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psychnurse:
code15: Doesn't anyone else think that Netflix (and rights holders) are completely entitled to do this? We pay $13 a month to access content that Netflix has purchased rights for in our country. That small fee shouldnt give us access to virtually any TV show/movie we want to stream.

Now if someone was paying for both an NZ account and a US account, and needed to unblock acces to US Netflix that's a different story. But I bet no one is in that category.


I like this analogy
Not my work but sourced from eye on demand

"It’s not terribly different to a customer who wants to buy a smart phone, but there’s only one brand of smart phone available in one shop in their town (If this sounds too impossible to imagine, bear with me). Perhaps that shop paid for the exclusive rights to sell phones in that town, and so the customer has no choice. But the next city along has more choice, so the consumer makes some form of effort to buy from further afield. Maybe they drove there, or asked a friend to buy one and send it back, or perhaps they just bought it off the Internet."


I like your analogy.  Lets apply it to the situation.  You buy the exclusive rights to a smartphone for the country.  So the next country has more choice - so the consumer flies to the next country and buys it.  
Or you buy the exclusive rights to content for a country.  And the next country has the content you want - so you fly to that country and watch it there.  And thats where your analogy breaks down - people aren't flying to the US to watch Netflix US.  




Sixth Labour Government - "Vision without Execution is just Hallucination" 


PhantomNVD
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  #1472435 16-Jan-2016 10:23
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But until their recent launch, most people were paying the US Netflix directly for a US account, and felt (feel) if the US citizens are able to buy that content legally (and the creators are getting paid what they feel is fair [from US residents] by doing so) why should we not also be able to pay and watch legally by the laws of our country (rather than be forced to 'steal' [pirate]) the content?

It's the same as my US iTunes account, why should my location on the planet affect the price (and availability) of digital content? It is shipped for the same cost (data) and gives the acceptable return (profit) to the producer and simply INCREASES the legal customer base?

tdgeek
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  #1472437 16-Jan-2016 10:31
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Is Netflix created content in all countries?

freitasm
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  #1472440 16-Jan-2016 10:38
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tdgeek: Is Netflix created content in all countries?


No, Netflix created-content is not in all countries. This is because Netflix creates the content but the rights are managed by another company.

Here is the explanation why House of Cards is not available on Netflix NZ:


For those who are confused as to why Netflix is unable to stream some of its original content in Australia and New Zealand, you're not alone. But the explanation is quite simple: Netflix doesn't actually own any of its original content.

Instead of producing its original content, Netflix simply signs an agreement for exclusive streaming rights to a production, as well as a first-run window agreement. After that window expires, however, the production company is free to license the content to anyone, including home video distributors and international networks and streaming services.

Such is the case with House of Cards and other early Netflix originals. The company bought global rights for more recent series like Marco Polo, though.

That stands in contrast to Time Warner (NYSE:TWX) subsidiary HBO. HBO produces its originals itself, which gives it complete control over where those series end up. When it expands internationally, its original content is the key for keeping its costs low. Comparatively, Netflix's costs to expand internationally include thousands of new content-licensing contracts, which drive profits in those markets down into negative territory.

Because Netflix doesn't hold the international rights to many of its originals, those rights are often bought by other networks or streaming services in international markets well before Netflix even lays plans to expand into those markets.

As such, House of Cards fans in Australia and New Zealand have been getting their fill from Showcase (a premium cable network in Australia), TV3 (a nationwide broadcast network in New Zealand), and Lightbox (a Netflix analog in New Zealand). With many potential subscribers having viewed its original content already, it decreases the appeal of a new Netflix subscription.


This may have changed for newer content as they change their policies.





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