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194 posts

Master Geek


  # 2164780 21-Jan-2019 14:24
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i hope it will result in a lot of new content and potentially some great new spin off shows produced by each of the studios.

 

 

 

this seems a better model for developing new shows rather than just independents hoping to hit off a good show with a TV channel. More funding available as they have to keep the machine rolling..

 

 

 

  


Overarching undertones
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  # 2164783 21-Jan-2019 14:37
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dfnt:

Remember back in the day when you could just subscribe to one service, Sky, and mostly get everything you need to watch in one place?


Can't wait to subscribe to 15 difference streaming services to get shows instead, who needs ease of use anyway!



I remember back in the day when we got TV on my tenth birthday in 1962. We were the third house in our street to get it.

It was one channel b&w on a CRT from 5 pm until about 10 pm - and we had everything we wanted to watch all in one place. We were so happy!

 
 
 
 


gzt

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  # 2164799 21-Jan-2019 14:56
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rugrat: Not sure what will happen with market fragmentation, as not all of them are going to get everyone’s money at once.

The fragmentation could see a revival of filesharing if the pricing doesn't meet the market. If they allowed some pay per view that could help eg; Google Play.



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  # 2164805 21-Jan-2019 15:04
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gustov:

Roku has been offering a similar voice search service for sometime for owners of Roku devices but with the added benefit of also listing where the show might be watched for free, and then listing the rent and buy options. I can't see any free viewing listings with Justwatch...



I heard good thing about Roku.

There's a GZ thread called "Best Roku setup in NZ"

https://www.geekzone.co.nz/forums.asp?forumid=151&topicid=223257

Also this webpage

"Roku NZ Buyers Guide (2018) + Setup Procedure + Hidden Apps"

https://www.ki-wi.co.nz/roku-nz-buyers-guide/



Lock him up!
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  # 2164814 21-Jan-2019 15:17
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dfnt:

 

Remember back in the day when you could just subscribe to one service, Sky, and mostly get everything you need to watch in one place?

 

Can't wait to subscribe to 15 difference streaming services to get shows instead, who needs ease of use anyway!

 

 

Terrible quality, backward technology, rotten content. Howso everything you need to watch in one place? Sky almost never had anything I want to watch. Thank goodness for geo-unblocking.

 

 





I don't think there is ever a bad time to talk about how absurd war is, how old men make decisions and young people die. - George Clooney
 


184 posts

Master Geek


  # 2164821 21-Jan-2019 15:24
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I wonder if Netflix and the upcoming services will put limits into how many times you can sub and resub within a certain period of time. I wonder if we might start seeing a minimum of 6 month contracts etc. To stop people cancelling after a month once theyve watched the new season of Stranger things or whatever.


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Trusted

  # 2164824 21-Jan-2019 15:32
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Zepanda66:

 

I wonder if Netflix and the upcoming services will put limits into how many times you can sub and resub within a certain period of time. I wonder if we might start seeing a minimum of 6 month contracts etc. To stop people cancelling after a month once theyve watched the new season of Stranger things or whatever.

 

 

it will be easier for people to get back to torrents.

 

current VOD providers provide more or less great experience: one place to watch it all. but if fragmentation becomes an issue - back to old days of torrents.





helping others at evgenyk.nz


 
 
 
 


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  # 2164866 21-Jan-2019 16:38
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What I would really like to see is the likes of Disney offering premium rentals of their movies a short time after their theatre release. The experience at our local multiplex is 'sub-optimal' to say the least and I would be willing to pay a premium to watch a blockbuster at home, a month after release, rather than 6 months later.




Areas of Geek interest: Home Theatre, HTPC, Android Tablets & Phones, iProducts.

956 posts

Ultimate Geek

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  # 2164897 21-Jan-2019 17:14
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You have one App (e.g. Apple subscriptions) which lists everything; tv shows, movies, books, magazines, newspapers etc and if you want to read or watch you "Pay Per View" either per show/episode or series/season, a daily newspaper read or a months subscription etc. You then only have one account therefore one bill.





iMac 27" (late 2013), Airport Time Capsule + Airport Express, iPhone7, iPad6, iPad Mini2

 

Panasonic Blu-ray PVR DMR-BWT835 + Panasonic Viera TH-L50E6Z, Chromecast Ultra, Yamaha AVR RX-V1085


719 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2164906 21-Jan-2019 17:39
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dfnt:

 

Remember back in the day when you could just subscribe to one service, Sky, and mostly get everything you need to watch in one place?

 

Can't wait to subscribe to 15 difference streaming services to get shows instead, who needs ease of use anyway!

 

 

 

 

Umm Skys catalogue outside of sports has always been woeful, old and limited - so gonna have to disagree.




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  # 2164933 21-Jan-2019 18:01
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CNET

Disney+ streaming service: Release date, price, shows and movies to expect


Disney's getting ready to give Netflix a run for its money. But will it be worth it?

Disney is betting big on its 2019 streaming service called Disney+.

The company is ending its streaming deal with Netflix to launch its own service that will be the exclusive home for Disney movies, TV shows and other original programming. Disney CEO Bob Iger has said the streaming service is the company's "biggest priority" for 2019.

Just don't expect movies from any Disney mega-budget franchises like Star Wars to debut there. The company is reserving those for theaters first.

If you're feeling monthly fee fatigue, sorry but that's the direction the entertainment business is headed. Netflix trots out original shows and movies on a near daily basis. Hulu (which will be controlled by Disney after its acquisition of Fox) provides an online home for many broadcast networks. CBS is pumping its CBS All Access service full of Star Trek shows and other original programs. (Editors' note: CBS is CNET's parent company.) NBCUniversal, HBO-owner WarnerMedia and Apple are all building their own streaming services. Even DC Entertainment now has its DC Universe streaming service full of shows, movies and comics.

So is the 2019 Disney+ streaming service something you should consider? The details are below, though here's the tl;dr: If you love Star Wars or Marvel movies, yes.
...
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/disney-disneyplus-streaming-service-name-release-date-shows-movies-to-expect/



3086 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2164936 21-Jan-2019 18:09
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The Wrap
How Much ‘Star Trek’ Is Too Much? CBS All Access Boldly Tests Limits of Viewers’ Fandom


“Star Trek: Discovery” is back, and reinforcements are on the way

CBS All Access will boldly go as far as it can to mine viewers from “Star Trek.”

As the small-but-growing streamer tries to compete with Netflix and Hulu, executives are looking to Gene Roddenberry’s creation to take CBS All Access to the next frontier. The company will try to stretch the rabid fandom for “Star Trek” all the way into the outer reaches of space. But the streamer’s head of programming promises Vulcan-like logic and restraint.

“There’s no benefit to just pushing out into the marketplace tons of ‘Star Trek content. That’s not our intention,” Julie McNamara, executive vice president of original content, CBS All Access, told TheWrap. “We’re looking to mine it wisely and effectively.”

Along with “Star Trek: Discovery,” which debuted its second season on Thursday, CBS All Access has at least two more live-action series in various stages of development. At the end of this year, Sir Patrick Stewart will return as Captain Jean-Luc Picard, in a new series following his “Star Trek: The Next Generation” character. Earlier this week, All Access put into development a series centered around Michelle Yeoh’s Philippa Georgiou character from “Discovery.”

CBS All Access also has the animated “Lower Decks” on the horizon, and is developing a second animated series. Additionally, CBS All Access has ordered two more installments of its “Short Treks” shortform series.
....
https://www.thewrap.com/how-much-star-trek-is-too-much-cbs-all-access-boldly-tests-limits-of-viewers-fandom/

543 posts

Ultimate Geek

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  # 2164940 21-Jan-2019 18:23
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I have a concern as I am Deaf (along with over 600,000+ people in NZ who are Deaf or hard of hearing). Generally we find streaming services to be exceptionally poor when it comes to providing subtitles. Netflix is exception however with around 99% of their catalogue available with English subtitles (though the quality of some is not very good—e.g. foreign language shows tend to subtitle only the foreign languages and the translation can be hit and miss).

 

I am not aware of any other streaming service in NZ that has subtitles for at least the majority of their catalogue. Even services which stream videos that come with subtitles overseas, are streamed locally without subtitles. TVNZ on demand has only recently started providing subtitles for a select few shows (Shortland Street IIRC) making them (as far as I know) the only local outfit to even attempt the provision of subtitles.

 

YouTube has automatic captions which can be interesting to watch, especially if the speakers don't have the American accents expected by Google's algorithms.

 

For many years prior to Netflix arriving in NZ, the Deaf community got by via other means (which I am sure many here can guess as to what I mean). I wonder if we will see the Deaf community abandoning Netflix and going back to the old ways. Less $$$ for media companies from a significant chunk of society...




3086 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2164948 21-Jan-2019 19:08
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Netflix lost a lawsuit with the US "National Association of the Deaf (NAD)"

It sets a legal good precedent for all US streaming services.

https://www.3playmedia.com/2015/07/23/nad-v-netflix-ada-lawsuit-requires-closed-captioning-on-streaming-video/

"National Association of the Deaf" vs Netflix:
"Americans with Disabilities Act" Lawsuit Requires Closed Captioning on Streaming Video


The internet offers a unique challenge: how do we ensure that all of our digital products, services, and communications are accessible to people with disabilities? What are companies required to do to accommodate such users?

Federal disability laws await comprehensive updates to keep pace with the digital world. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) will get input from the DOJ in 2018.

Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act got an ICT refresh in 2015 to reflect WCAG 2.0 accessible web design best practices.

Aside from direct amendments to the laws, disability case law has played a major role in setting precedent for how the ADA applies to the internet. One landmark case: NAD v. Netflix.

The Complaint

In June 2011, the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) filed suit against Netflix, citing their lack of closed captioning for streaming video as a violation of the ADA.

Netflix offers mail-order DVDs, which abide by FCC closed captioning rules, but its “Watch Instantly” online streaming service was not captioned.

Since more than half of all Americans watch Netflix, the video streaming service must be made accessible to deaf and hard of hearing viewers.

NAD President Bobbie Beth Scoggins explained:

“We have tried for years to persuade Netflix to do the right thing and provide equal access to all content across all platforms. They chose not to serve our community on an equal basis; we must have equal access to the biggest provider of streamed entertainment. As Netflix itself acknowledges, streamed video is the future and we must not be left out.”
...
Judge Ponsor ruled that:

It would be “irrational to conclude” that “places of public accommodation are limited to actual physical structures.

“In a society in which business is increasingly conducted online, excluding businesses that sell services through the internet from the ADA would run afoul of the purpose of the ADA. It would severely frustrate Congress’s intent that individuals with disabilities fully enjoy the goods, services, privileges, and advantages available indiscriminately to other members of the general public.”


In other words, the judge ruled in favor of the NAD’s argument that Netflix is subject to the ADA and therefore must provide closed captioning for streaming web video.

Netflix was ordered to caption its streaming video library by 2014, and to continue captioning content published thereafter. It also paid the NAD $755,000 for legal fees and damages.

Conflicting Rulings

It’s important to note that the ruling in NAD v. Netflix was a Massachusetts district court decision, not a US Supreme Court decision. That means that this ruling provides precedent for the ADA’s interpretation in regards to digital businesses, but it not the law of the land, officially. That leaves room for different interpretations and sometimes conflicting rulings.

In 2011, Netflix was the target of a different closed captioning lawsuit, Cullen v. Netflix. In that case, the judge ruled that Netflix is not subject to the ADA because it is not a physical place – the exact opposite decision from NAD v. Netflix. This ruling is unpublished, however, which means it is not intended to set a legal precedent.

What NAD v. Netflix Means for the ADA

The NAD v. Netflix lawsuit sent a strong message to video creators and distributors that the ADA may apply to your online content. This has far-reaching implications for other entertainment companies that stream video online, like Hulu or HBO Go. It can also affect how the ADA is interpreted in cases of educational video, such as the closed captioning lawsuit against Harvard and MIT.

Note that in the years since this case, Congress passed the 21st Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act (CVAA), which applies FCC closed captioning rules to any online video content that previously aired on American television with captions. This erased any doubt that streamed TV shows need captions.

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Uber Geek
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  # 2164949 21-Jan-2019 19:10
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I can't see the point of paying Disney monthly when, if you want those movies, you can buy them from apple/google/bluray etc.

 

I watched the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movies with my kids over the holiday... I just bought the ones I didn't have.

 

Now if I was subscribed, I'm not going to watch them again so why would I pay Disney again NEXT month??? Same with Marvel, Pixar, etc... I'm not re-watching them every single month, and if I do (deadpool, but still not monthly) I'll buy it.

 

I'll stick with the variety of Netflix (docos, originals, black mirror, stand up comedy, and some random movies that I'd never watch again) and Amazon (old movies and TGT).

 

 

 

Plus, how many geeks that like star wars, don't already have star wars?

 

Even I have the first three (and think they're pretty crap) laughing


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