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Topic # 196071 18-May-2016 11:24
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My wife and I exercise fairly regularly and could use a wrist-mounted gadget that shows pulse rates. Nothing else needed - just pulse.

 

However, apart from only needing something simple (like pulse display), we're pensioners and don't want to spend much.

 

Suggestions about model, brand (or even 2nd hand) would be appreciated.

 

Thanks :-)


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  Reply # 1554734 18-May-2016 11:52
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I have one of these, I find it quite good, link to a 2nd hand one for sale on trademe. You can also find new ones for roughly double that.

 

http://www.trademe.co.nz/sports/other/auction-1087662672.htm 

 

 

 

 

 

 





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  Reply # 1554755 18-May-2016 12:27
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 Doesn't that one require you to wear a chest strap thou?, is that an issue for the OP or not?

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1554756 18-May-2016 12:31
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Wrist heartrate monitors are supposedly a lot less accurate than the chest ones, so that may be an advantage of the one linked above if OP doesn't mind both wrist and chest strap. 

 

(at least according to some research I did when buying a fitbit surge - I still ended up getting one, I just take the heartrate readings with a grain of salt)


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  Reply # 1554802 18-May-2016 13:43
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sidefx: Wrist heartrate monitors are supposedly a lot less accurate than the chest ones, so that may be an advantage of the one linked above if OP doesn't mind both wrist and chest strap. 

 

(at least according to some research I did when buying a fitbit surge - I still ended up getting one, I just take the heartrate readings with a grain of salt) 

 

I have the Surge as well, and when I was in hospital recently it was showing exactly the same heart rate as the large and very expensive-looking colour monitor they had me hooked up to. Admittedly I was laying still on a bed at the time, so I concede that it might be less accurate when engaged in physical activity that would have the arm moving, e.g. jogging, rowing...


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  Reply # 1554825 18-May-2016 14:29
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How about a finger pulse oximeter.

 

Can get them for under $50 online.

 

A.

 

 


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  Reply # 1554853 18-May-2016 14:34
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http://www.ebay.com/bhp/finger-pulse-oximeter

 

 

I've got a similar one.

 

Answered that question I had about what happens to my blood saturation when I'm a plane.

 

 

A.

 




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  Reply # 1555400 19-May-2016 10:49
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 Hey, great answers guys, thanks.

 

Lias and Wellygary: You've reminded me that somewhere in my dusty archives I have one of those chest-strap gizmos that I got many years back with a weird Israeli fitness machine (hybrid elliptical\cycle). I only used the monitor once, seeing as it was a bit clunky to operate.

 

So I was hoping that a wrist-mounted thingy would be better. I didn't know that this type isn't too accurate.

 

Maybe I should look at the oxymeter gizmos. Sounds like they're more accurate?


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  Reply # 1555402 19-May-2016 10:51
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I got a wrist band pedometer thing recently, but it only takes heart rate measurements when you load the cell phone app and stand still with it turned sideways on my wrist held at chest height.

 

 

 

Short version, it's a pain and a gimmick and not at all what I'd expected.


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  Reply # 1555562 19-May-2016 13:09
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Pulse oximeter gives you additional information and are accurate with reasonable circulation of finger tips.

 

But they arent the sort of device you keep on continuously because you cant use your finger if its in a device.

 

Like any discussion about devices, what are you aiming to do with it? Continious monitoring over longer periods of time or asking what your pulse is at the moment then take it off.

 

 

 

A.

 

 




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  Reply # 1555741 19-May-2016 17:13
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afe66: I'm just looking for an easy-to-use pulse measurer for my wife, who's recently got keen on improving her fitness. The oxymeter sounds ideal for her, because she could get off the rower, or elliptical trainer, and quickly poke her finger into it (I'm guessing that this is what you do), then get an accurate assessment of her pulse.

 

Thing is, she seems to be one of those people with a higher than normal pulse rate, and I've been trying to prove to her that, as long as she feels comfortable, she needn't worry about it. I mean, I can assess the rate for her after exercise, but it would be better if she has a gadget nearby that she could quickly use herself, as well as watching how fast it recovers, which is really the best measure of fitness.


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  Reply # 1556066 20-May-2016 10:54
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If you don't need to wear it during the exercise, you can get a smart phone app (Instant Heart Rate) which measures your heart rate using the phone's camera.

 

I was a bit dubious about it, but compared it to a chest strap heart rate monitor and the results were identical.

 

I was resting at the time though, so not sure if it's as accurate when the heart rate is elevated.

 

If you want to wear it during exercise, the most accurate option would be a cheap heart rate monitor with a chest strap.

 

 




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  Reply # 1556412 20-May-2016 16:48
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If you don't need to wear it during the exercise, you can get a smart phone app (Instant Heart Rate) which measures your heart rate using the phone's camera.

 

Good grief! How's that for tech stuff? How does it work? I've got a Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5. Would it work on that?

 

After or during exercise? I think 'after' would be OK. I mean, the pulse rate isn't going to drop by too much in the 30 secs or so it'd take to run the app.


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  Reply # 1556451 20-May-2016 17:49
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geekIT:

 

If you don't need to wear it during the exercise, you can get a smart phone app (Instant Heart Rate) which measures your heart rate using the phone's camera.

 

Good grief! How's that for tech stuff? How does it work? I've got a Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.5. Would it work on that?

 

After or during exercise? I think 'after' would be OK. I mean, the pulse rate isn't going to drop by too much in the 30 secs or so it'd take to run the app.

 

 

 

 

Should do. Have a look for "Instant Heart Rate" on the Google Play Store.


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  Reply # 1564090 2-Jun-2016 11:07
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sidefx:

 

Wrist heartrate monitors are supposedly a lot less accurate than the chest ones, so that may be an advantage of the one linked above if OP doesn't mind both wrist and chest strap. 

 

(at least according to some research I did when buying a fitbit surge - I still ended up getting one, I just take the heartrate readings with a grain of salt)

 

 

 

 

Yes this makes sense as the main issue with finger attachable ones from my experience is that the Infrared LED and Photodiode/Transistor need to stay still and at the same amount of pressure on the skin so that the lowpowered cpu and embedded software can keep it's approximations accurate. I have a Facelake CMS50F pulse oximeter (with bluetooth) which I have hardly used because of the issues with maintaining steady 'grip' while actually doing exercise. In my case it was for a martial art, but we do so much work on the floor that it's not suitable to use this device as a wearable... It works better for before and after measurements.

 

The sensor itself is embedded in a flexible rubber sheath that goes around the finger, and the controller mounts on the wrist like a watch. The display is OLED, and the device is rechargeable, and along with bluetooth has a USB connector. It lasts a long time on one charge, though I'm not sure how accurate it is. There is a calibration system built into the software but it is tricky to work and I don't have a reference device to match it to anyway. Overall it is a nice design, but would be better suited to overnight use in a bed or use by small medical clinics. (providing of course that it is accurate and can be calibrated!)


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