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Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 202119 18-Sep-2016 10:46
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I recently came across this interesting site which deals with a practical application of the "emotion code" and the "body code" which was developed by Dr Bradley Nelson:

 

http://www.feelgoodfast.info/animal-on-emotion-code.php

 

It talks about how an animal can be treated for some of its ailments remotely by phone or Skype.

 

Here are a couple of extracts from the above page:

 

"Is your cat crazy? Is your dog down in the dumps? Is your horse in a huff? The Emotion Code and The Body Code can help. Has your vet been unable to find the cause of your pet’s physical problem? Using The Body Code, I may be able to help him or her by releasing negative energies from their sub-conscious mind.

 

Working by phone or skype with you, I can explain what I’m doing as I do it. Your animal may be beside you or somewhere else, it makes no difference."

 

I am interested in your views about whether the remote treatment of animals is scientifically possible.

 

Thanks

 

Fred

 

 


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BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 1632403 18-Sep-2016 11:12
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I think this says it all about this "treatment": "your animal may be beside you or somewhere else, it makes no difference."





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  Reply # 1632405 18-Sep-2016 11:14
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Sounds about as legit as curing cancer with healing stones


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  Reply # 1635381 18-Sep-2016 11:52
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  Reply # 1635382 18-Sep-2016 12:00
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Depends on how much it costs. The more it costs the better your cat will be. If you have at least a million dollars your cat can live forever.





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  Reply # 1635383 18-Sep-2016 12:01
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freitasm:

 

I think this says it all about this "treatment": "your animal may be beside you or somewhere else, it makes no difference."

 

 

Yes - "There is no need to bring the animal to me, or for me to visit the animal. The Body Code and The Emotion Code are every bit as effective when applied remotely."

 

At least those claim don't need to be substantiated by bothersome clinical trial.

 

nas:

 

Sounds about as legit as curing cancer with healing stones

 

 

This photo is on the website, not sure if they're "curing" stones - they look like throwing stones to me.

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1635386 18-Sep-2016 12:03
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frednz:

 

I am interested in your views about whether the remote treatment of animals is scientifically possible.

 

 

No.

 

And we don't have to prove it doesn't work. This person needs to prove it does.







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  Reply # 1635394 18-Sep-2016 12:50
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freitasm:

 

frednz:

 

I am interested in your views about whether the remote treatment of animals is scientifically possible.

 

 

No.

 

And we don't have to prove it doesn't work. This person needs to prove it does.

 

 

Agreed, so what I'm interested in is what NZ health regulations apply to anyone who wants to set up a practice and offer any kind of health services to the NZ public?

 

This person seems to have studied the Body Code system as described here:

 

http://www.bodycodehealingsystem.com/

 

It says on this site that, by enrolling now you can save $16,000 on the "real world value":

 

"All the pieces of The Body Code 2.0 together have a real world value of $16,992. The normal, full retail price of the system is $4,997. Our current offer is much lower at only $997 for all this truly priceless knowledge."

 

But is the Body Code system recognised and approved by NZ health authorities, or doesn't it need to be for anyone to set up and offer any kind of health services to the public (and animals)? Or is it simply a case of "buyer beware" and do your own research about anything you pay money for?

 

Thanks

 

Fred

 

 


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  Reply # 1635400 18-Sep-2016 13:08
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NZ law only legislates for health practitioners that need licensing. If don't claim to be a license-required health practitioner you don't fall under any laws and can do whatever you want without fear of causing harm.





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  Reply # 1635403 18-Sep-2016 13:21
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freitasm:

 

No science. No peer review. No science basis. Only baseless claims.

 

 

Thanks for that, it's a very interesting site, I'm interested in the "scientific" view on all this. Here's a short extract from the above page:

 

"Anyway, there is no reason to believe that energy healing of any kind is anything but placebo medicine. There is no justification for belief in muscle testing (applied kinesiology) as valid for anything. Kirlian photography does not prove energy fields exist around all living things. There is no evidence that magnets can "untrap emotions," whatever that might mean."

 

There's also an interesting write-up here about the bi-digital "o-ring" test which even appears to have been investigated by NZ medical authorities:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BDORT

 

Apparently all this comes under the heading of "applied kinesiology", but has it been completely scientifically disproved, it seems to have a lot of followers from people in the alternative medicine group?

 

Regards

 

Fred

 

 


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  Reply # 1635404 18-Sep-2016 13:25
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Dr Bradley Nelson, Creator of the Body Code System, describes himself a "Holistic Chiropractor"

From his website:


Are You Worth The Investment?

The answer is YES. Your health is priceless! You were meant to be happy and enjoy life, to attract abundance and create what you want to create. You are worth it. Don’t wait another minute, start using The Body Code and improve your life today.

... Wait - There’s More!

 





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  Reply # 1635412 18-Sep-2016 13:26
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joker97:

 

NZ law only legislates for health practitioners that need licensing. If don't claim to be a license-required health practitioner you don't fall under any laws and can do whatever you want without fear of causing harm.

 

 

Gosh that's interesting, I'll set up my "alternative" medical practice right away, what's to stop me? When you say NZ law "only legislates for health practitioners that need licensing", this raises the question, which health practitioners DO need licensing? Isn't the NZ public protected at all by legislation from people who offer medical services to them (and animals)?

 

Regards

 

Fred


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  Reply # 1635415 18-Sep-2016 13:32
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That body code BS is tied in with so-called theta "healing". It's all lies and BS.

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/newsnight/9519657.stm

 

From what I've seen (too much unfortunately) of the "theta healing" scam, it's in my opinion somewhat worse than typical snake oil.

 

It seems to be organised on the promise of great wealth being achievable by way of becoming "qualified" - naturally at great expense by attending "courses", then of course once you're up at high levels in the cult, you could run courses yourself to supplement the income you're making by ripping off your unfortunate "patients", then gather new recruits from convinced survivors.  Quackery wrapped into a scientology model of pyramid marketing.

 

For ripping off cancer patients "Lypo-spheric" vitamin C is another one popular in NZ at the moment, about $60 for a small pack of Vitamin C sachets. No specific therapeutic claims made, just a whole load of woo-woo BS.

 

MLM is a very good way of avoiding laws designed to protect us from false therapeutic claims, it makes it very hard to catch these scamsters, tar and feather them and run them out of town.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1635423 18-Sep-2016 13:53
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The NZ Skeptics have been pushing for regulation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for years.

 

Have a read here: http://skeptics.nz/activities/cam


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  Reply # 1635428 18-Sep-2016 14:07
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MackinNZ:

 

The NZ Skeptics have been pushing for regulation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for years.

 

Have a read here: http://skeptics.nz/activities/cam

 

 

The NZ Skeptics site quotes Marcia Angell, editor of the New England Journal of Medicine:

   

 

" There cannot be two kinds of medicine - conventional and alternative. There is only medicine that has been adequately tested and medicine that has not, medicine that works and medicine that may or may not work. Once a treatment has been tested rigorously, it no longer matters whether it was considered alternative at the outset. If it is found to be reasonably safe and effective, it will be accepted. But assertions, speculation, and testimonials do not substitute for evidence. "

 





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