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  Reply # 1635429 18-Sep-2016 14:07
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I bet it works just as well as them magnetic blankets.

Ultrasonic/mains cable inductive pest repellers should be placed in the same camp but the CC is happy with them so long as there's on going research. They only need a quack to say they've done research to claim it works.



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  Reply # 1635443 18-Sep-2016 15:08
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MackinNZ:

 

The NZ Skeptics have been pushing for regulation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for years.

 

Have a read here: http://skeptics.nz/activities/cam

 

 

Thanks, that's most interesting. I see that NZ does have a NZ Society of Naturopaths and that they "accept as full members only those Naturopathic Practitioners who have completed accredited courses and are fully qualified and trained to standards recognised by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA)."

 

So it seems that some areas of "alternative" medicine are recognised by NZQA, but are the activities of qualified naturopaths subject to regulation?

 

For example, can a qualified naturopath write out a prescription for medicine?

 

It seems that qualified naturopaths are well accepted in the NZ medical scene, do you agree?

 

Thanks

 

Fred

 

 

 

 

 

 




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  Reply # 1635450 18-Sep-2016 15:15
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freitasm:

 

I think this says it all about this "treatment": "your animal may be beside you or somewhere else, it makes no difference."

 

 

Aren't we overlooking something here, remember that:

 

A horse is a horse, of course, of course,
And no one can talk to a horse of course
That is, of course, unless the horse is the famous Mister Ed

 

So if your horse is "in a huff" and its name is Mr Ed, then perhaps the Body Code system would in fact work?


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  Reply # 1635575 18-Sep-2016 18:58
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Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Until this claim can be tested as being true, with others being able to repeat the tests, I would give it a wide berth and treat it as snake oil.




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  Reply # 1635611 18-Sep-2016 20:56
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mugs2000:

 

Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. Until this claim can be tested as being true, with others being able to repeat the tests, I would give it a wide berth and treat it as snake oil.

 

 

I agree entirely with these sentiments. However, one web site says that:

 

"Snake oil is a preparation that comes from the Chinese water snake and which is used widely in the treatment of joint pain. This is an 'alternative' treatment for arthritis and similar conditions, and one that has gotten a bad name for itself and become synonymous with phony medications and in fact all bogus products."

 

 


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  Reply # 1635614 18-Sep-2016 21:13
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I think the OP is not looking for opinions or evidence that points out anything contrary to his beliefs. I am leaving the thread now.





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  Reply # 1635620 18-Sep-2016 21:49
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I get the impression that the OP is tolling.

 

I'm outta here.




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  Reply # 1635705 19-Sep-2016 09:46
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freitasm:

 

I think the OP is not looking for opinions or evidence that points out anything contrary to his beliefs. I am leaving the thread now.

 

 

Fair enough, but please allow me to explain a little more about what my "beliefs" are in this situation!

 

I suppose many researchers have a strong belief in a particular issue and then look for evidence that supports this belief and ignore or water down evidence that is contrary to that belief. We see this from time to time with some TV documentaries and news shows.

 

However, I think my extensive research training has taught me to keep an open mind and to at least consider the merits or otherwise of differing points of view. But, I have to admit that, I am strongly in favour of the scientifically verifiable view of medicine and healing rather than the faith healing view and the alternative medicine view.

 

So, when I came across this web site that said a person could use an alternative medicine technique known as "the body code system" to remotely help distressed animals, I thought this raised a lot of interesting issues which I thought were worthy of discussion. In particular, are there any laws in NZ that regulate people who offer such "faith healing" services?

 

This issue is also being discussed on the front page of this morning's "Dominion Post" by John Weekes which is headed "Slack border checks assist shyster influx". The article mentions that "The witchdoctors were accused of fleecing 'thousands of dollars from vulnerable people', the documents released under the Official Information Act show."

 

So this raises the issue of how can outrageous claims be accepted by the "vulnerable people" referred to in Weeke's article? Don't we teach our young people to "question everything" before believing in things? How can a person who claims to heal sick animals remotely over the phone get any business? What can NZ do to help "vulnerable people" from being ripped off by people who make outrageous claims on internet?

 

Regards

 

Fred

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1635722 19-Sep-2016 10:12
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Most behavioural problems with dogs/cats/horses (and some physical problems) are caused/perpetuated by the behaviour of their owners.  'Remote healing' could be achieved by counselling the owner.

 

Customers and problems will also self select - people who entertain the possibility of remote healing are more likely to believe that it has occurred.  Customers are also likely to seek remote healing for particular problems.   You won't seek a remote healing for Fifi if she has a broken leg, but you might if she has arthritis.

 

There is also the substantive 'placebo' effect on the owner.  No-one wants to feel silly or gullible.  Having forked over several hundred dollars for Fifi to be remote healed of course her arthritis will improve.

 

Only Fifi actually knows and she ain't talking.

 

 

 

 





Mike

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  Reply # 1635738 19-Sep-2016 10:48
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There is a technical term for alternative medicine which has been independently verified to be effective - its called medicine.




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  Reply # 1635862 19-Sep-2016 13:35
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MikeAqua:

 

Most behavioural problems with dogs/cats/horses (and some physical problems) are caused/perpetuated by the behaviour of their owners.  'Remote healing' could be achieved by counselling the owner.

 

Customers and problems will also self select - people who entertain the possibility of remote healing are more likely to believe that it has occurred.  Customers are also likely to seek remote healing for particular problems.   You won't seek a remote healing for Fifi if she has a broken leg, but you might if she has arthritis.

 

There is also the substantive 'placebo' effect on the owner.  No-one wants to feel silly or gullible.  Having forked over several hundred dollars for Fifi to be remote healed of course her arthritis will improve.

 

Only Fifi actually knows and she ain't talking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes it certainly looks like some "non-qualified" medical advisors rely quite heavily on the placebo effect.

 

I agree that some behavioural problems with animals can be caused / perpetuated by their owners' behaviour, but do you think the claims made on this page are unlikely to be accepted by people who "question everything" before they part with their hard-earned cash?


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  Reply # 1635890 19-Sep-2016 14:23
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frednz:

 

...but do you think the claims made on this page are unlikely to be accepted by people who "question everything" before they part with their hard-earned cash?

 

 

"unlikely to be accepted" -> "question everything"

 

You answered your own question within your question. The claims made are ridiculous. What are you trying to achieve here?

 

If you want to peddle bs go watch day time TV. They will show you exactly how to market the ridiculous as sensible.

 

 


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  Reply # 1635948 19-Sep-2016 16:13
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The website reads to me like it projects a lot of human emotions onto animals and then purports to offer a cure.

 

 





Mike

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  Reply # 1636049 19-Sep-2016 19:13
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My dog can levitate and talk to God but he only does it when no-one is watching since the uninitiated should not have access to this knowledge. But if you give me money I will show you how to do it yourself, but it will only work if your soul is pure and you truly believe in lunar fairies. 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1636410 20-Sep-2016 10:31
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Qualified vets administer quack medicine:

 


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