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  Reply # 1636608 20-Sep-2016 15:43
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MikeAqua:

 

The website reads to me like it projects a lot of human emotions onto animals and then purports to offer a cure.

 

 

 

 

Yes, that sounds like a fair summary of it. Another web site that deals with the body code system also claims to be able to "release the fears of animals":

 

Can you work on pets and other animals?

 

Yes. Animals are actually easy to work on as they don’t seem to hold back their inner wisdom, and usually don’t have as many imbalances. I have worked on cats, dogs, and horses. I volunteer my work at a Cat Hospital & Foundation that takes in abandoned cats. There are usually over 100 cats living there, and that’s where many of them will live out their lives. They have food, shelter, medicines, and freedom to roam in a large space. However, most of them have traumatic emotional wounds. Working on them brings a deep satisfaction as their fears are released, and they once again become trusting.

 

I suppose any animal that is given the proper care and training can improve its behaviour when with humans. However, I think the amazing claims made about a lot of alternative medicines and treatments are not backed by proper independent research studies. It's just too easy on a web site to make startling claims, but there always seems to be somebody who believes in everything they are told. For example, internet dating scams trap lots of people into sending money overseas to a person that simply isn't genuine. The Dr Phil TV show has highlighted many of these cases. Perhaps we need courses on critical thinking in NZ colleges.

 

However, without a lot more research on my part I wouldn't go as far as saying that everything that qualified NZ naturopaths offer is BS because the qualifications they get are approved by NZQA and I doubt whether NZQA would give its backing to "pure quackery"!


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  Reply # 1636612 20-Sep-2016 15:49
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Well, it works for chiropractors. Gotta keep those energy lines in check!

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  Reply # 1639303 23-Sep-2016 11:30
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MackinNZ:

 

The NZ Skeptics have been pushing for regulation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for years.

 

Have a read here: http://skeptics.nz/activities/cam

 

 

 

 

I think they're probably f_rting against thunder.

 

I'll give you an example - but you'll need to "join some dots" between the links I'll give you and then reach your own conclusion:

 

First an extract from a web archive link:

 

 

Note that's from a NZ registered company.

 

Note that "neutraceutical research" is big business for NZ.

 

 

 

Shhhh...

 

Lets not talk about it, "alternative" medicine is a multi-billion $$$ industry.

 

 


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  Reply # 1639324 23-Sep-2016 11:57
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It must be true if she says so. After all, it is on the Internet! 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1639345 23-Sep-2016 12:17
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frednz:

 

 

 

However, without a lot more research on my part I wouldn't go as far as saying that everything that qualified NZ naturopaths offer is BS because the qualifications they get are approved by NZQA and I doubt whether NZQA would give its backing to "pure quackery"!

 

 

Academic governance shouldn't need to get down to the nitty-gritty of determining "fact from fiction" in course material etc - or you open a can of worms that's better kept closed.  So "approved" by NZQA isn't a guarantee that knowledge acquired has been subject to tests of scientific rigour (by some panel of independent experts in all fields), just that it's delivered and measured to required standards.

 

Possibly, and in my opinion only here, there's funding allocated here by TEC.  How much, I don't know, but quick perusal of course fees offered by private and state providers, it's substantial. (Fees per full time course of say $2500, my guess there's at least $6,000 EFT payment by TEC per student per year, probably more).

 

As a skeptic, that seems like a hell of a lot to me.  OTOH TEC measure outcomes over the longer term, job placement etc.  If there are jobs for "complementary and alternative medicine" graduates out there, then funding will be made available.

 

A very sad thing (IMO) is that the UN has just agreed (180 nations signed up) to fund about a billion dollars worth of research to develop methods / treatments to counter the increasing threat of resistant disease organisms.  It sounds like a lot, but it's not - NZers alone spend about that sum each year on vitamins and supplements, most of which aren't proven to have any therapeutic benefit at all.

 

 


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  Reply # 1639369 23-Sep-2016 12:53
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Rikkitic:

 

It must be true if she says so. After all, it is on the Internet! 

 

 

 

Not my point.  These are therapeutic claims which were made on the site.

 

The product was made and sold by ...

 

And where are those involved in this scam now, and what are they doing?

 


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  Reply # 1639381 23-Sep-2016 13:07
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A problem with this kind of thing is that authorities here are not always as proactive with enforcement as they could be. As long as the shysters are allowed to get away with it, they will keep trying it on. I wish our regulatory agencies would do a better job of stomping on the snake oil hucksters and psychic phonies because these despicable people often prey on the desperate, not just the superstitious.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1639636 23-Sep-2016 21:54
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Call it the stupid tax and move on.


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  Reply # 1639743 24-Sep-2016 10:53
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MadEngineer:

 

Call it the stupid tax and move on.

 

 

 

 

No - when false therapeutic claims are being made it's predatory behaviour.

 

Those "cancer curing pills" were being pushed using hard-sell tactics at $200/bottle to a person I knew well - who had terminal cancer with metastases on the brain, and had undergone palliative full-brain irradiation. 

 

I'm very disappointed to see where the individual I believe to be behind that is now. 


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  Reply # 1639773 24-Sep-2016 11:09
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This reminds me of the time an ex of mine dragged me along to this crystal healing new age whatever thing.

 

This guy was there and giving a spiel about psychic surgery. I listened to that load of crap for a few minutes before walking out.




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  Reply # 1639844 24-Sep-2016 12:55
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Fred99:

 

Rikkitic:

 

It must be true if she says so. After all, it is on the Internet! 

 

 

 

Not my point.  These are therapeutic claims which were made on the site.

 

The product was made and sold by ...

 

And where are those involved in this scam now, and what are they doing?

 

 

 

I hadn't heard of GanoPoly before reading your post. So, how would a patient go about researching whether or not Gano Poly is a recognised effective cancer treatment? What international research has been done on the effectiveness or not of GanoPoly for the treatment of cancer? And what standards would you expect to have been applied in carrying out this research?

 

 


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  Reply # 1639855 24-Sep-2016 13:43
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I would think that if anything cured cancer, or even improved it a little, this would be splashed across headlines all over the place. It would be in newspapers, on TV, across the Internet. No-one is going to go out of their way to keep this kind of thing secret.

 

When 'cures' pop up in the back alleys and dark corners of the Web, I am very suspicious. If it works, why is it not being shouted from the rooftops? Oh, right, sorry, I forgot it is all a huge conspiracy on the part of government, pharmaceutical interests, the weapons lobby, fossil fuel producers and god knows what else. Of course the truth is out there, it is just being whispered.

 

People want to believe some obscure self-proclaimed healer with a miracle ingredient and no evidence beyond questionable testimonials but they think their doctors who have studied for years to obtain their qualifications and who read the medical journals to keep up with developments have nothing useful to tell them? I do not understand this kind of wilful ignorance and I never will. I do understand a desperate person reaching for any possibility but that is another matter.

 

Reputable scientists have to be cautious so details of promising research may not be immediately released, but in today's world nothing remains hidden for long. The way to research if something is an effective treatment is just to look it up. If there is serious mention of it in a range of medical publications and other media, it may be worth pursuing. Ask your doctor. If it is just being discussed on flakey New Age blogs and questionable 'alternative' sites, be skeptical. Common sense is your guide.

 

edit typo

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 




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  Reply # 1640147 25-Sep-2016 11:06
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Rikkitic:

 

I would think that if anything cured cancer, or even improved it a little, this would be splashed across headlines all over the place. It would be in newspapers, on TV, across the Internet. No-one is going to go out of their way to keep this kind of thing secret.

 

When 'cures' pop up in the back alleys and dark corners of the Web, I am very suspicious. If it works, why is it not being shouted from the rooftops? Oh, right, sorry, I forgot it is all a huge conspiracy on the part of government, pharmaceutical interests, the weapons lobby, fossil fuel producers and god knows what else. Of course the truth is out there, it is just being whispered.

 

People want to believe some obscure self-proclaimed healer with a miracle ingredient and no evidence beyond questionable testimonials but they think their doctors who have studied for years to obtain their qualifications and who read the medical journals to keep up with developments have nothing useful to tell them? I do not understand this kind of wilful ignorance and I never will. I do understand a desperate person reaching for any possibility but that is another matter.

 

Reputable scientists have to be cautious so details of promising research may not be immediately released, but in today's world nothing remains hidden for long. The way to research if something is an effective treatment is just to look it up. If there is serious mention of it in a range of medical publications and other media, it may be worth pursuing. Ask your doctor. If it is just being discussed on flakey New Age blogs and questionable 'alternative' sites, be skeptical. Common sense is your guide.

 

edit typo

 

 

 

 

Yes, all excellent advice. However, don’t you think that skeptics should be very certain before declaring a particular person or treatment or medication to be completely worthless?

 

 


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  Reply # 1640187 25-Sep-2016 12:12
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Sorry, no. People making extraordinary claims should be very certain before saying they have a cure for anything.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 




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  Reply # 1640352 25-Sep-2016 20:36
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Rikkitic:

 

Sorry, no. People making extraordinary claims should be very certain before saying they have a cure for anything.

 

 

 

 

I think it needs to be remembered that there are sometimes “shades of grey” with medical research and that not all research produces an immediate “black and white” answer as to whether a potential drug is useful or not. For example, take a look at this article about Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi mushroom):

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22696372

 

This article concludes that:

 

“Our review did not find sufficient evidence to justify the use of G. lucidum as a first-line treatment for cancer. It remains uncertain whether G. lucidum helps prolong long-term cancer survival. However, G. lucidum could be administered as an alternative adjunct to conventional treatment in consideration of its potential of enhancing tumour response and stimulating host immunity.

 

So, it might be fair to conclude that the polysaccharide content of reishi mushroom is responsible for possible anticancer and immunostimulatory effects and that it is therefore too early to categorise this treatment as “quackery” or “a scam” because it may be useful as "an alternative adjunct to conventional treatment".

 

 


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