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  Reply # 1932824 9-Jan-2018 13:44
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NZSpides:

If you've had Giardia, you'd be worried about it.


I had it once and I lost 3 kilos in 2 days and it took me a week to recover.


 



Sounds like a great weight loss program... you should write a book and arrange to sell the required ‘seed stock’ to the aforementioned rich (often obese) idiots buying the “raw water” needed to grow your ‘seed stock’ too 🙄

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1932834 9-Jan-2018 13:52
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Treated town water supply is best if you can get it. If you cant the Ruapehu District Council publishes a useful guide;

 

 

 

http://www.ruapehudc.govt.nz/our-services/drinking-water-wastewater-and-stormwater/drinking-water-supply/water-useage/rainwater-tanks/Documents/Rainwater%20tanks.pdf


 
 
 
 


BTR

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  Reply # 1932846 9-Jan-2018 13:55
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dickytim:

 

BTR:

 

Goosey:

 

ChCh is generally untreated water given the aquifers on the Canterbury plains....

 

Yum. (it really is nice water to drink). 

 

 

 

 

It is for now, wait another 10-15 years for the dairy farming to have ruined it all. 

 

 

Wait for 5 years before the city folk ruin it with their effluent...

 

Stop the dairy farmer bashing already.

 

 

 

 

Im not that great at physics but how does CHCH waste water which is treated and discharged at sea flow uphill to the Canterbury plains?. We have already seen water quality issues in outer areas like Darfield which have been linked to heavy farming. 

 

We hear numerous reports of cattle being in rivers when they shouldn't be yes thats a very small minority but how often does a cow defecate a day compared to a human. The problem isn't the farmers individually the problem is the industry has grown so massive its taken over and with the chemical sprays and amount of cattle its destroying the rivers which is what feeds our water supplies.

 

If you can't see that you have your head in the sand.

 

 

 

 

 

 


836 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1932847 9-Jan-2018 13:55
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NZSpides:

 

If you've had Giardia, you'd be worried about it.

 

I had it once and I lost 3 kilos in 2 days and it took me a week to recover.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not having been crook from rain water for this long, we're probably not going to change now.

 

In summer you can sometimes get mosquito larvae in the water, but a coke bottle cap of kerosene creates a film on the water that deals to them.


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  Reply # 1932849 9-Jan-2018 13:56
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I believe the clown behind the Juciero disaster is now doing a raw water startup. Don’t need to know any more than that!

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  Reply # 1932865 9-Jan-2018 14:08
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trig42:

 

I've got a couple of tanks full of 'Raw' Water at home. I'd happily offer these fools a discount on their $40 bottles. 50% off for bulk purchases, can be paid via Western Union, buyer must arrange freight.

 

 

 

 

Totally, me too. They can either have mine filtered through a 1um mechanical filter (no chemicals!) or straight out of the tank, microbe spores and all. :-D





iPad Air + iPhone SE + 2degrees 4tw!

These comments are my own and do not represent the opinions of 2degrees.




734 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1932892 9-Jan-2018 14:44
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ObidiahSlope:

Treated town water supply is best if you can get it. If you cant the Ruapehu District Council publishes a useful guide;


 


http://www.ruapehudc.govt.nz/our-services/drinking-water-wastewater-and-stormwater/drinking-water-supply/water-useage/rainwater-tanks/Documents/Rainwater%20tanks.pdf



Mentions a "first flush diverter", which sounds like a very good idea


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  Reply # 1933214 9-Jan-2018 22:22
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You mean they just want to collect and drink rain?

 

That's pretty common in these parts. When we moved in we immediately installed filters and UV treatment because of the organic matter that lands on roofs and the various sprays used on the vineyards and olive groves that surround us, the fertiliser hurled willy nilly from aircraft on nearby hills and so on. That's before you get into the plumbosolvency issues of heavy metals from tanks and pipes if the house is of any age....








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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1933289 10-Jan-2018 07:01
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You forgot lead contaminated roof paint.

Regarding increased risk of disease from roof top rain collecting, from a Massey University study, the analysis of 621 cases of gastroenteritis in New Zealand, it was found that the consumption of roof-collected rainwater was associated with three times the risk of campylobacteriosis than that of nonconsumers.

An estimated 237 cases (2%) of the annual campylobacteriosis cases in New Zealand are likely to be due to the consumption of bird faeces-contaminated rainwater.

An investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella in New Zealand in 2003 also found that a number of people had drunk roof-collected rainwater where the pathogen was detected in the rainwater tanks.

In another case-control study on risk factors for giardiasis among children in Auckland, it was again found that consumption of roofcollected rainwater significantly increased the risk of the disease.


Mad Scientist
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  Reply # 1933293 10-Jan-2018 07:16
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Aredwood: When people get sick from drinking this water, will they try and sue for not ensuring that the water they are selling is safe to drink.

But on a more serious note, there is a group of people who don't understand even basic science. The ones who think that vaccines are a cause of autism and a scam, who think that homeopathy actually works, and who believe claims that modern water treatment processes alter the molecular structure of water.

The worst part though is these people will be giving this water to their kids. The kids can't make their own safety judgments.

 

I've spoken to a few of these type of people.

 

They praise themselves for understanding more science than you do.


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  Reply # 1933326 10-Jan-2018 08:13
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kingdragonfly: You forgot lead contaminated roof paint.

Regarding increased risk of disease from roof top rain collecting, from a Massey University study, the analysis of 621 cases of gastroenteritis in New Zealand, it was found that the consumption of roof-collected rainwater was associated with three times the risk of campylobacteriosis than that of nonconsumers.

An estimated 237 cases (2%) of the annual campylobacteriosis cases in New Zealand are likely to be due to the consumption of bird faeces-contaminated rainwater.

An investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella in New Zealand in 2003 also found that a number of people had drunk roof-collected rainwater where the pathogen was detected in the rainwater tanks.

In another case-control study on risk factors for giardiasis among children in Auckland, it was again found that consumption of roofcollected rainwater significantly increased the risk of the disease.



I'll be honest, I'd never even heard of people in the 21st century doing this in developed nations until I moved here.

I used to work in the UK water industry and there, mains water is a legal right. Developers simply serve notice on the water company requiring them to connect new houses and the companies can only charge them the nominal statutory fee even if a multi million pound project is needed to comply with the request.
I've just done a subdivision here and the council actually imposed a condition that the purchasers never connect to the town supply, even though it actually crosses one of the plots!





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  Reply # 1933327 10-Jan-2018 08:13
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kingdragonfly: You forgot lead contaminated roof paint.

Regarding increased risk of disease from roof top rain collecting, from a Massey University study, the analysis of 621 cases of gastroenteritis in New Zealand, it was found that the consumption of roof-collected rainwater was associated with three times the risk of campylobacteriosis than that of nonconsumers.

An estimated 237 cases (2%) of the annual campylobacteriosis cases in New Zealand are likely to be due to the consumption of bird faeces-contaminated rainwater.

An investigation of an outbreak of Salmonella in New Zealand in 2003 also found that a number of people had drunk roof-collected rainwater where the pathogen was detected in the rainwater tanks.

In another case-control study on risk factors for giardiasis among children in Auckland, it was again found that consumption of roofcollected rainwater significantly increased the risk of the disease.



I'll be honest, I'd never even heard of people in the 21st century doing this in developed nations until I moved here.

I used to work in the UK water industry and there, mains water is a legal right. Developers simply serve notice on the water company requiring them to connect new houses and the companies can only charge them the nominal statutory fee even if a multi million pound project is needed to comply with the request.
I've just done a subdivision here and the council actually imposed a condition that the purchasers never connect to the town supply, even though it actually crosses one of the plots!







734 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1935540 10-Jan-2018 13:18
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There seems to misplaced pride in drinking rain-water, or using an aquifer without treatment.

Unless there's monitoring it's dangerous. For home-owners using rain-water, I hope they're doing yearly professional checks, and full-system flushes.

For a municipality, it should be a formal lab test weekly.

In the US, it's almost unheard of, except for post-apocalyptic survivalists, and mountain men.

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1935575 10-Jan-2018 13:57
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kingdragonfly: There seems to misplaced pride in drinking rain-water, or using an aquifer without treatment.

Unless there's monitoring it's dangerous. For home-owners using rain-water, I hope they're doing yearly professional checks, and full-system flushes.

For a municipality, it should be a formal lab test weekly.

In the US, it's almost unheard of, except for post-apocalyptic survivalists, and mountain men.

 

 

 

Home water tank treatment/UV filters etc is only a fairly recent development in NZ, it's only been trendy as townies move to tank water only areas.

 

Most people I know on tank water don't have any filtration/treatment and I've never heard any reports of mass sickness or higher than average water borne disease amongst them.




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1935578 10-Jan-2018 14:01
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In the Massey report, they mentioned a lot of rain water drinkers didn't always go to the doctor when they got a tummy bug.

Their theory is if you're using rain water to drink, you're likely rural, and further away from your GP.

They concluded sickness due to rainwater collection was vastly under-reported, as proved by their actual testing of the water people were drinking.

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