Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | ... | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22
2254 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1075


  Reply # 1981636 22-Mar-2018 16:17
Send private message quote this post

MikeAqua:

 

stuartmac:

 

 I should be able to go cycling as an everyday activity in street clothes. Most people feel  they cannot do that as it is perceived as too dangerous. There IS evidence of that, and it is incorrect to state that mandatory helmet laws are not a significant contributor.

 

 

I'm struggling to follow your argument here but ...

 

You can go cycling in everyday street clothes (with helmet).  Specialist cycling clothing 't really protect you in the case of an accident - compare it to specialist motorcycling clothing.

 

Arguably an everyday pair of jeans provides more protection (and privacy) than spandex.

 

The only down side of cycling in street clothes that I'm aware of is the clothes aren't designed for cycling and may wear faster, and you need to keep the away for the chain.

 

 

I think that the perception (if you'll pardon the pun) is that a cyclist nowadays *need* hi-viz stuff. And perhaps strobe lights. And probably quite rightly... most cycle injuries are caused by motorists, and a fair chunk of those by motorists who didn't see the cyclist.

 

Give it enough time and these would also be mandatory. After all, exactly the same justifications can be applied as for helmets. And I'd hazard a guess that a hi-viz jacket and a strobe light or two would do more for a cyclist's safety than a helmet. And it's far cheaper than separating motorists, who are the root cause, from cyclists.

 

 




11648 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2003

Trusted

  Reply # 1981649 22-Mar-2018 16:41
Send private message quote this post

Geektastic:

 

tdgeek:

 

No, I hadnt watched it. Just did. It is cumbersome. I don't see its relevance at all. If it happened to be somewhat safer (and many here feel a helmet doesn't make much difference) you just end up with a helmet that is somewhat cumbersome and somewhat safer than the standard helmet. Plus few will buy one as it looks silly around the neck, cumbersome to wear and costs more than many cycles.

 

 

 

 

Your suggestion that 'few will buy it' rather flies in the face of the success the company is...! Their revenue is over SEK50 million (About NZ$10 million)

 

 

 

Also, the point of a free market is choice. Normal bike helmets look silly also and there are plenty of people in the world (and even in NZ) who are quite willing to pay for what they want. Perhaps you are not one of them, but that does not mean that they do not exist.

 

 

 

Their product is also extremely good.

 

 

 

"In 2012 the Swedish insurance company Folksam tested 13 cycle helmets on the market. They carried out an impact test on the same principles as for CE marking but with a higher impact speed, 25 km/h instead of 20 km/h.

 

All the traditional helmets achieved G-force ranging from 196 to 294 g. The lower the value, the better the helmet’s ability to protect the cyclist’s head in an accident. Hövding achieved 65 g, providing at least three times better shock absorption than the other helmets"

 

 

I doubt many cyclists who whine about having t wear a helmet will outlay $500 to wear a scarf. I doubt that families will outlay for 3 or 4 of them. I also debt there are many people who are bothered with the helmet law, it was just an article about a big protest that ended up being a whimper. He even said that helmets for kids should be voluntary, the parents can decide. Now that is bizarre.


 
 
 
 


Try Wrike: fast, easy, and efficient project collaboration software
2436 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 652


  Reply # 1981655 22-Mar-2018 17:00
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Click to see full size

Sometimes a picture says a 1000 words...

What head could have survived this?

590 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 204


  Reply # 1981656 22-Mar-2018 17:05
4 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

@PhantomNVD whether or not helmets can provide protection and whether or not helmet laws are a good idea are two separate issues. The title of this thread is misleading because the real issue is with helmet laws not if people should wear helmets when riding in high-risk situations.





Amanon



11648 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2003

Trusted

  Reply # 1981658 22-Mar-2018 17:07
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

PhantomNVD: Click to see full size

Sometimes a picture says a 1000 words...

What head could have survived this?

 

No head. Cannot see the relevance. Helmets, of any kind, add to safety, they dont guarantee it. Cycle helmets are basic, as cyclists don't travel at 100kph, so they very much help lower speed impacts onto hard surfaces. With no helmet, a very very low speed impact to a hard surface is inherently serious. 


2436 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 652


  Reply # 1981682 22-Mar-2018 18:56
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Dulouz:

@PhantomNVD whether or not helmets can provide protection and whether or not helmet laws are a good idea are two separate issues. The title of this thread is misleading because the real issue is with helmet laws not if people should wear helmets when riding in high-risk situations.



So if we agree helmets provide protection, how can helmet laws NOT be good?

5844 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2886


  Reply # 1981698 22-Mar-2018 19:26
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

PhantomNVD:
Dulouz:

 

@PhantomNVD whether or not helmets can provide protection and whether or not helmet laws are a good idea are two separate issues. The title of this thread is misleading because the real issue is with helmet laws not if people should wear helmets when riding in high-risk situations.

 



So if we agree helmets provide protection, how can helmet laws NOT be good?

 

 

 

Condoms provide protection, but condom laws probably wouldn't be good.


2902 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1323


  Reply # 1981709 22-Mar-2018 19:58
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

PhantomNVD:
Dulouz:

 

@PhantomNVD whether or not helmets can provide protection and whether or not helmet laws are a good idea are two separate issues. The title of this thread is misleading because the real issue is with helmet laws not if people should wear helmets when riding in high-risk situations.

 



So if we agree helmets provide protection, how can helmet laws NOT be good?

 

 

 

Then by that logic it should be law that:

 

  • all car occupants wear helmets as they provide protection in a crash
  • All walkers/runners wear hi viz gear and helmets as they provide protection if they trip or fall and when crossing roads
  • All children playing on the monkey bars at school should wear helmets and have safety harnesses lest they fall
  • Anyone climbing a tree should have a helmet and a safety harness

Life is full of dangers, so do we legislate against all of them?  There use to be a thing when I was young called common sense.  My era also use to learn about risk and using good judgement to decide for themselves what they were willing to do and what protection they needed, without requiring the state to specifically legislate against it. 

 

Not saying any of these is a bad idea, just where does it end?     

 

 

 

 

 

   





Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



13799 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1717


  Reply # 1981747 22-Mar-2018 22:23
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

 

 

 

 

It is really all about managing risk and unsing 'common sense', rather than eliminating it. Compulsory cycle helmets when on roads is doing this, in terms of what is sensible and within reasonable costs. I am not sure it is compulsory if you are cycling in a park is it, I thought it only applied if you are on a road? So I am not even sure it applies if you are on a cycle track? Would be interesting to know.

 

Tonight I saw the end of something about banning playing ruby in schools, becuase it is too danagerous, and the risk of injury is high. If you are a rugby player, at some stage you are likely to get some injury as a result in your lifetime, as I did myself. We have been heading down a slippery slope with health and safety, and being too PC for a while now.




11648 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2003

Trusted

  Reply # 1981789 23-Mar-2018 06:20
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

scuwp:

 

PhantomNVD:
Dulouz:

 

@PhantomNVD whether or not helmets can provide protection and whether or not helmet laws are a good idea are two separate issues. The title of this thread is misleading because the real issue is with helmet laws not if people should wear helmets when riding in high-risk situations.

 



So if we agree helmets provide protection, how can helmet laws NOT be good?

 

 

 

Then by that logic it should be law that:

 

  • all car occupants wear helmets as they provide protection in a crash
  • All walkers/runners wear hi viz gear and helmets as they provide protection if they trip or fall and when crossing roads
  • All children playing on the monkey bars at school should wear helmets and have safety harnesses lest they fall
  • Anyone climbing a tree should have a helmet and a safety harness

Life is full of dangers, so do we legislate against all of them?  There use to be a thing when I was young called common sense.  My era also use to learn about risk and using good judgement to decide for themselves what they were willing to do and what protection they needed, without requiring the state to specifically legislate against it. 

 

Not saying any of these is a bad idea, just where does it end?     

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

It does need to end somewhere. For a cycle, it ends with just a helmet, and given that a person is off the ground, often on a hard surface, often near concrete, and competing with other cycles and cars and trucks, thats a good line in the compulsory stand. 

 

Cars, we already have a helmet, thats the crash tested bodywork and chassis. The rest is low risk, low speed = common sense.


3981 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1565


  Reply # 1981822 23-Mar-2018 08:44
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Fred99:

 

Condoms provide protection, but condom laws probably wouldn't be good.

 

 

We have a condom law - for the sex industry.





Mike

5844 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2886


  Reply # 1981975 23-Mar-2018 11:37
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

MikeAqua:

 

Fred99:

 

Condoms provide protection, but condom laws probably wouldn't be good.

 

 

We have a condom law - for the sex industry.

 

 

...since when is riding a bicycle to the corner store an "industry".

 

 


1234 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 522


  Reply # 1983292 26-Mar-2018 10:55
3 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

sxz: If it's summer, and you are at the beach to get the paper and some milk, and you are riding about 10kmh, there is no need for a helmet. 

 

If you're riding on the road, there is always a need to wear a helmet - it doesn't matter how short your trip is or how slow you're going. I was once rear-ended by a car while cycling along Customhouse Quay in Wellington. I was going quite slow, and keeping well to the left, but still hit my head pretty hard when I landed. So when you share the road it's not always about your own behaviour.

 

Dulouz: The helmet law has contributed to a decrease in cycling along with a perception that cycling is a dangerous activity.

 

Has the helmet law contributed to a decline in cycling though? Sure, they have statistics that say fewer people are cycling since the helmet law was introduced, but have they looked for other reasons why that might have happened? The number of cars on our roads has increased in that time, and there is a very real anti-cycling mentality among many motorists. Perhaps people are not riding because they don't feel safe? As property prices have increased, people who are likely to take up cycling to work (younger people) can't afford to live close to the city so have moved to suburbs further out. Perhaps people are not riding because they live too far away? With the emergence of the internet/video gaming, perhaps there are just a lot more kids around now who can't be bothered exercising and would rather be on the couch in front of the TV with their PS3 and 2.5 litres of full-sugar Coke? With the rise in the gym culture, perhaps the people who actually want to exercise feel they are already getting enough from other sources?

 

When people cite the higher number of cyclists in European countries where there is no compulsory helmet law, are there other factors that may contribute to this? Cycling has always been more popular in Europe, both competitively and for social and commuting purposes. There is better infrastructure for cyclists in many Eurpoean cities, and (with the possible exception of the UK) motorists are far more aware and tolerant of cyclists. Perhaps cyclists in the Netherlands and Denmark just feel safer, or travel shorter distances, so it's seen as a more viable means of transport?

 

In over 40 years of cycling, I have tried to encourage a number of people to ride. Many of them have taken it up. Of the people who said "no thanks", some have quoted safety, the weather, the distance, etc. Some have said they just can't be bothered. But I have never heard one single person say "no, I don't want to ride because I'd have to wear a helmet".


1234 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 522


  Reply # 1983310 26-Mar-2018 11:19
Send private message quote this post

On a separate, but related, note - I have always worn a helmet when I ride, and always will, even if the law changes to make it optional. And I will never mount anything on my helmet. I notice a lot of cyclists with helmet-mounted equipment - usually lights or GoPro-type cameras.

 

Is that a good idea? I'd be worried that if I landed on my head, some pointy, hard plastic mounting bracket could cause more damage than if I landed on the road with no helmet on. I heard thic scenario may have contributed to the brain injury in Michael Schumacher's skiing accident, but I don't remember whether that was ever confirmed...


6881 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3225

Subscriber

  Reply # 1983362 26-Mar-2018 11:53
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

The point (pardon the pun) is that you are making a choice to wear a helmet. I am being denied a choice not to. You have the choice, I do not. That is what is being objected to.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


1 | ... | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Opera launches new mobile browser: Opera Touch
Posted 25-Apr-2018 20:45


TCF and Telcos Toughen Up on Scam Callers
Posted 23-Apr-2018 09:39


Amazon launches the International Shopping Experience in the Amazon Shopping App
Posted 19-Apr-2018 08:38


Spark New Zealand and TVNZ to bring coverage of Rugby World Cup 2019
Posted 16-Apr-2018 06:55


How Google can seize Microsoft Office crown
Posted 14-Apr-2018 11:08


How back office transformation drives IRD efficiency
Posted 12-Apr-2018 21:15


iPod laws in a smartphone world: will we ever get copyright right?
Posted 12-Apr-2018 21:13


Lightbox service using big data and analytics to learn more about customers
Posted 9-Apr-2018 12:11


111 mobile caller location extended to iOS
Posted 6-Apr-2018 13:50


Huawei announces the HUAWEI P20 series
Posted 29-Mar-2018 11:41


Symantec Internet Security Threat Report shows increased endpoint technology risks
Posted 26-Mar-2018 18:29


Spark switches on long-range IoT network across New Zealand
Posted 26-Mar-2018 18:22


Stuff Pix enters streaming video market
Posted 21-Mar-2018 09:18


Windows no longer Microsoft’s main focus
Posted 13-Mar-2018 07:47


Why phone makers are obsessed with cameras
Posted 11-Mar-2018 12:25



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.