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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2094955 22-Sep-2018 14:27
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geekIT:

 

I find it odd that no one has mentioned circumcision to prevent fungal infections.

 

 

Unless you have Phimosis, you shouldn't be getting fungal infections.

 

 

 

 

 

 








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  Reply # 2094960 22-Sep-2018 15:00
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Our ancient ancestors knew a thing or two and we now tend to forget that circumcision was originally practised to help eliminate infection and infectious diseases. It was specifically practised amongst those of hot, dry and sandy based cultures. Think about the pain and inflammation if you get a grain of sand under the foreskin.

 

I did a paper during my uni nurse training about the origins and spread of STD's and specifically HIV on the African continent. It was discovered in the late 80's early 90's that those men who were circumcised were less likely to get HIV than those who weren't due to the cellular structure of the inside of the foreskin (cells of Langerhans) which are more susceptible to the uptake of certain virus's.

 

This practice and that of swine free diets say a lot about our ancient forefathers knowing, anecdotally, a thing or too about diseases and their transmission.

 

Does it need to be practised today in our "1st world" country ? Apart from penile structural problems and a respect for cultural/religious reasons, properly not. The only problem I see is the lack of male hygiene education that young males receive from parents. I have lost count of the number of balanitis cases I have seen and whilst working in a children's hospital in Sydney I looked after numerous cases of botched religious circumcisions, the worst being a child actually lost the head of his penis due to untreated infection post religious circumcision. There is one benefit though to keeping your foreskin and that is as a skin graft where the cells of the foreskin are grown in the lab then to be used as grafts in very severe burns.

 

Ok end of my 2 cents worth.





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  Reply # 2094984 22-Sep-2018 16:38
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mattwnz:

 

Is it common to have it done to babies near the time of birth these days? My brother is, but none of his boys are, and I would have thought that he would have wanted it doing so they matched especially when they ask questions down the track.

 

 

It's pretty rare to have it done at or soon after birth in NZ  - looks like around 10% (though of course there'll be groups that still do so for religious/cultural reasons); this isn't the case in the US, where a significant majority of boys are circumcised.

 

I can't see why it should be a big issue about having father and sons a mix of snipped or not - kids may be inquisitive, but they are also typically accepting of such stuff. Given it's now generally regarded as not necessary (noting the post above...), I can totally see why fathers would be happy for their sons not to get the snip even if they did so themselves.

 

I understand there can be tension, though, when one parent is keen on it for their child due to religious/cultural reasons, and the other parent is resistant. 


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  Reply # 2094997 22-Sep-2018 17:37
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FineWine:.....Does it need to be practiced today in our "1st world" country ? Apart from penile structural problems and a respect for cultural/religious reasons, probably not. The only problem I see is the lack of male hygiene education that young males receive from parents. I have lost count of the number of balanitis cases I have seen and whilst working in a children's hospital in Sydney I looked after numerous cases of botched religious circumcisions, the worst being a child actually lost the head of his penis due to untreated infection post religious circumcision. There is one benefit though to keeping your foreskin and that is as a skin graft where the cells of the foreskin are grown in the lab then to be used as grafts in very severe burns.

 

 

Thanks for that, interesting.

 

Yep, balanitis is my problem, and it's persisted for around five years now, in spite of all the various pills, potions and creams that doctors at the local  Medical Center have prescribed. At least 6 or 7 different medicos have checked me out, owing to the frequent rotation of docs in this small-town practice, many of whom are American. So it's not only one doc who's been involved.

 

Pretty much every one of the more conventional treatments that are noted on the following websites have been tried but nothing works permanently.

 

I don't know for sure how it started, but I suspect it may have been kicked off by an otherwise very clean and healthy sex partner with a thrush problem.

 

Anyway, it seems to be there to stay and is a really annoying nuisance which is usually a minor irritation but sometimes painful. 

 

However, it's not so bad that I'd consider surgery at my advanced age, lol.

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/balanitis

 

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/184715.php

 

https://www.mshc.org.au/SexualHealthInformation/SexualHealthFactSheets/BALANITIS/tabid/134/Default.aspx#.W6XLT3ZoS00

 

Might have to try coconut oil or vinegar. They seem to be popular options in third word countries laughing

 

 


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  Reply # 2095087 23-Sep-2018 11:07
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geekIT:

 

Thanks for that, interesting.

 

Yep, balanitis is my problem, and it's persisted for around five years now, in spite of all the various pills, potions and creams that doctors at the local  Medical Center have prescribed. At least 6 or 7 different medicos have checked me out, owing to the frequent rotation of docs in this small-town practice, many of whom are American. So it's not only one doc who's been involved.

 

Pretty much every one of the more conventional treatments that are noted on the following websites have been tried but nothing works permanently.

 

I don't know for sure how it started, but I suspect it may have been kicked off by an otherwise very clean and healthy sex partner with a thrush problem.

 

Anyway, it seems to be there to stay and is a really annoying nuisance which is usually a minor irritation but sometimes painful. 

 

However, it's not so bad that I'd consider surgery at my advanced age, lol.

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/balanitis

 

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/184715.php

 

https://www.mshc.org.au/SexualHealthInformation/SexualHealthFactSheets/BALANITIS/tabid/134/Default.aspx#.W6XLT3ZoS00

 

Might have to try coconut oil or vinegar. They seem to be popular options in third word countries laughing

 

Thanks and my sympathy. Have any of the doctors actually taken a swab/s from under the foreskin and around the entire head and sent them of to the lab ?

 

As to witch doctor cures, up until winter this year I had been suffering from recurrent toe fungal infections. Now, I have been going to Bali for years and have picked up and used a local witch doctors brew called "Minyak Gosok" as a massage oil. Anyway long story short, I was using it to massage a very sore ankle/top of foot and it seeped into between my toes, well no more fungal infections, all cleared up after using prescribed and OTC stuff for ages. The literature that comes with this concoction states it will even cure knife wounds:

 

You can buy it off Amazon and eBay





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2095089 23-Sep-2018 11:15
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Minyak Gosok  Description

Benefits:
- Helps relieve joint pain, ulcers, headaches, itching due to insect bites, and flatulence.
- Treat sprains, body aches, neck muscles that feel stiff, pain in the waist and back.
- Treat burns, circumcision / circumcision, skin that is injured / blisters or skin affected by a knife.
- Relieve pain, headaches, coughing, itching due to insect bites, toothache and mouth sores.
- Treat veins & amp; bones, boils, dizziness, scabies, ringworm, phlegm, vomiting, diarrhea, aches, rheumatism, colds, stomach aches, shortness of breath, hemorrhoids, heartburn etc.
- Wasp oil is also commonly used for daily massage / massage use.

Difference between White Lid Wasp Cap Oil (Special Quality) and Red:
Hornet cap oil is found in two variants, namely the white oil wasp cap and red lid. This white cap wasp cap oil is known for its heat that permeates the muscles, making it suitable for massage / massage due to aches, or sprains.

Whereas for the red oil wasp cap lid, not as hot as the white lid which is suitable for the treatment of abrasions, itching due to insect bites, flatulence, and others.

In addition, the difference between the white oil wasp and red cover is on the amount of the content. In white lid wasp rubbing oil, the content of each ingredient is almost twice that of the red lid wasp cap. So that for the price of the two are different, where the rub oil of the white lid wasp is more expensive than the red lid.

How to use:
External use by rubbing or sticking cotton wool soaked with this rubbing oil in a sore place

 

Active Ingredients:

 

  • Menthol, 2.2% Topical Analgesic
  • Camphor, 4% Topical Analgesic
  •  

Inactive Ingredients:
Achyranthes root extract, bupleurum root extract, cajuput oil, coconut oil, ceylon citronella root extract, Chinese wild ginger herb extract, fingeroot (Kaempferia pandurata Roxb.), garlic bulb extract, ginger extract, greater galangal rhizome extract, lawang (Cinnamomum culilawan) oil, onion bulb extract, pepper root extract, piper betel leaf extract, pubescent angelica (Angelica Polyclada Franch.) root extract, Saigon cinnamon stem extract, turmeric rhizome extract, turpentine oil, and West Indian lemongrass oil.





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  Reply # 2095197 23-Sep-2018 18:49
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FineWine:

 

I did a paper during my uni nurse training about the origins and spread of STD's and specifically HIV on the African continent. It was discovered in the late 80's early 90's that those men who were circumcised were less likely to get HIV than those who weren't due to the cellular structure of the inside of the foreskin (cells of Langerhans) which are more susceptible to the uptake of certain virus's.

 

This practice and that of swine free diets say a lot about our ancient forefathers knowing, anecdotally, a thing or too about diseases and their transmission.

 

 

HIV wasn't a disease in humans in ancient times - so those ancient forefathers must have had some foreskin foresight huh?  Funny thing is some if those cultures also perform so-called female circumcision (aka "genital mutilation") - which AFAIK has no protective value - and a very significant risk of killing the victim.  If there's some reduction in likelihood of transmission of HIV for circumcised men (either way), then it's ridiculous to suggest it as some kind of preventative measure.  First reason is that reducing risk (if true) isn't eliminating risk, second is that there are a host of other diseases which may be transmitted by unprotected sex. For example Hep C and assorted multi-resistant bacterial infections.

 

As far as Kosher/Halal and pork goes, plenty of other forbidden foods don't have any unique risks, and while trichinosis may be a thing, any meat that would have been eaten in ancient times presented significant risk of killing you if not stored and prepared properly. 

 

These days where risk of acquiring HIV from unsafe sex can be reduced - by use of PrEPs - presents a moral dilemna - as the same unsafe sex practises are contributing to spread of other diseases which are a problem - and it's going to get much worse.  (If you prescribe PrEPs - then are you encouraging unsafe sex practice - thus increasing spread of Hep C and multi-resistant venereal disease?)

 

 


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  Reply # 2095285 24-Sep-2018 02:01
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Fred99:

 

FineWine:

 

I did a paper during my uni nurse training about the origins and spread of STD's and specifically HIV on the African continent. It was discovered in the late 80's early 90's that those men who were circumcised were less likely to get HIV than those who weren't due to the cellular structure of the inside of the foreskin (cells of Langerhans) which are more susceptible to the uptake of certain virus's.

 

This practice and that of swine free diets say a lot about our ancient forefathers knowing, anecdotally, a thing or too about diseases and their transmission.

 

HIV wasn't a disease in humans in ancient times - so those ancient forefathers must have had some foreskin foresight huh?  Funny thing is some if those cultures also perform so-called female circumcision (aka "genital mutilation") - which AFAIK has no protective value - and a very significant risk of killing the victim.  If there's some reduction in likelihood of transmission of HIV for circumcised men (either way), then it's ridiculous to suggest it as some kind of preventative measure.  First reason is that reducing risk (if true) isn't eliminating risk, second is that there are a host of other diseases which may be transmitted by unprotected sex. For example Hep C and assorted multi-resistant bacterial infections.

 

As far as Kosher/Halal and pork goes, plenty of other forbidden foods don't have any unique risks, and while trichinosis may be a thing, any meat that would have been eaten in ancient times presented significant risk of killing you if not stored and prepared properly. 

 

These days where risk of acquiring HIV from unsafe sex can be reduced - by use of PrEPs - presents a moral dilemna - as the same unsafe sex practises are contributing to spread of other diseases which are a problem - and it's going to get much worse.  (If you prescribe PrEPs - then are you encouraging unsafe sex practice - thus increasing spread of Hep C and multi-resistant venereal disease?)

 

Oh dear

 

I did not say or imply that HIV was a disease in humans in ancient times. But just as a Hungarian doctor in the early 1800’s discovered that hand washing could prevent patients from falling ill, and this is the important bit, without really fully understanding the reason why, so did our ancient forefathers understand that circumcision did the same thing in preventing transmission of certain diseases without understanding why. The why, in the case of circumcision, was only fully understood when a modern day disease, HIV, arrived on the scene.

 

Read the referenced article: “……..male circumcision provides significant protection against HIV infection; circumcised males are two to eight times less likely to become infected with HIV. Furthermore, circumcision also protects against other sexually transmitted infections, such as syphilis and gonorrhoea, ………”

 

Note here that with syphilis and gonorrhoea, that through medical archaeology (bone analysis) they have been proven to be ancient diseases. Again our ancient forefathers knew something was up with the foreskin.

 

As for the transmission of hepatitis via unprotected sex, yes it is possible but extremely low because hepatitis like a lot of STD’s (venereal diseases) is transmitted in the blood and therefore are only transmitted during rough unprotected sex. e.g. foreskin, penile, vaginal & anal tearing.

 

Remember of course that basic skin hygiene, through the use of soaps, for the bulk of the human population, is a modern phenomenon. Only the wealthy, mostly, could afford to be clean and in some cases washing was thought to be a sin and or contrary to good health and strangely enough those cultures that did practice circumcision, generally overall, were healthier just through good general hygiene practices.

 

As to female genital circumcision, there is no known health benefits and it is not performed for that reason but to only control a woman’s sexuality by male dominated societies.

 

Are you saying that circumcision is a PrEP (Pre-exposure prophylaxis). You could say it is. But just remember that PrEP is a modern day pharmaceutical based tool for the prevention of the transmission of HIV only and should be treated the same as a condom in the prophylaxis arsenal against the transmission of diseases.

 

The CDC, on male circumcision, counsel that there are significant health benefits in the procedure in the prevention of bacterial and viral infections and that the scientific evidence is clear that the benefits outweigh the risks.





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  Reply # 2095301 24-Sep-2018 08:13
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FineWine:

 

 

 

I did not say or imply that HIV was a disease in humans in ancient times. But just as a Hungarian doctor in the early 1800’s discovered that hand washing could prevent patients from falling ill, and this is the important bit, without really fully understanding the reason why, so did our ancient forefathers understand that circumcision did the same thing in preventing transmission of certain diseases without understanding why. The why, in the case of circumcision, was only fully understood when a modern day disease, HIV, arrived on the scene.

 

 

That is perpetuating myth.  From NZMJ:

 

 

Although many nineteenth century misconceptions about the foreskin have been dispelled since Douglas Gairdner showed that infantile phimosis was not a congenital defect, other old ideas have proved more persistent. Among the most ubiquitous are the proposition that ritual or religious circumcision arose as a hygiene or sanitary measure; and the related idea that allied troops serving in the Middle East during the Second World War were subject to such severe epidemics of balanitis that mass circumcision was necessary. Both these claims are medical urban myths which should be firmly laid to rest.

 

 

 


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  Reply # 2095604 24-Sep-2018 15:45
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Hmm. Personally I wouldn't be game to base my opinions on anecdotes from a thirteen-year-old medical journal. Every day we see reports of 'new' medical research that overturns or counters previous findings.

 

Regards adult circumcision, I believe that the only persons qualified to discuss the benefits or drawbacks (as it were) of the procedure are either:
1) Experienced nurses, who, most likely, have had firsthand (as it were) experience of the problems associated with these smegma traps or...
2) Those long-suffering males who are unfortunate enough to possess one of these evolutionarily outmoded appendages.

 

Come to think of it, there's a likely third group: the many women who had never before suffered from thrush until they began a sexual relationship with an uncircumcised male with low standards of personal hygene.

 

Personally, if I could go back in time, I'd find the hospital cot of my newly born self, and under little geekIT's mattress I'd plant a tape recording that shrilled, in a tiny voice (a la the original 'The Fly' movie), 'Circumcise me! Circumcise me!'


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  Reply # 2095618 24-Sep-2018 16:19
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geekIT:

 

Hmm. Personally I wouldn't be game to base my opinions on anecdotes from a thirteen-year-old medical journal.

 

 

An anecdote?  ROFL.

 

But you'd accept urban myth as fact. 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 2095696 24-Sep-2018 18:03
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I have yet to come across someone advocating for the removal of toes to prevent athletes foot, nor removal of ears so one no longer has to wash behind them... Why then mutilate a male child's appendage in the name of "hygiene"?

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  Reply # 2095752 24-Sep-2018 19:38
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Ge0rge: I have yet to come across someone advocating for the removal of toes to prevent athletes foot, nor removal of ears so one no longer has to wash behind them... Why then mutilate a male child's appendage in the name of "hygiene"?

 

Sorry, but those analogies are silly.

 

Are you 'intact' or 'trimmed'? Be honest.


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  Reply # 2095755 24-Sep-2018 19:43
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Fred99:

 

geekIT:

 

Hmm. Personally I wouldn't be game to base my opinions on anecdotes from a thirteen-year-old medical journal.

 

 

An anecdote?  ROFL.

 

But you'd accept urban myth as fact.

 

You'd bet your but on that?


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  Reply # 2095759 24-Sep-2018 19:53
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geekIT:

 

Ge0rge: I have yet to come across someone advocating for the removal of toes to prevent athletes foot, nor removal of ears so one no longer has to wash behind them... Why then mutilate a male child's appendage in the name of "hygiene"?

 

Sorry, but those analogies are silly.

 

 

Why - do you think that God put it there with the sole purpose for religious zealots to cut it off - or do you believe in evolution?


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