Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 
1400 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 693


  Reply # 2080799 29-Aug-2018 13:40
Send private message quote this post

Batman: Why did you have an anaesthesiologist when you were awake and had topical drops?


It was injections after the drops I believe, though hard to tell from my perspective. I guess it's because he paralyzed the eye muscles.

1400 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 693


  Reply # 2080808 29-Aug-2018 14:08
Send private message quote this post

kingdragonfly: the lids are kept open with a device, that looks like something from the movie "Mechanical Orange."


I meant "Clockwork Orange." If you remember a different version of this scene, that's means you existed in an alternate reality


1817 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 659

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2080840 29-Aug-2018 15:12
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

The most common eye block is a sub tenon eye block, this provides a longer lasting numb eye as well as paralyses the muscles of the eye so that they eyeball can't be moved by anxious patients. They work through a couple of cuts a couple of mm wide where the clear part of the eye connects to the white, and patients moving their eyes can make this difficult.

Often a small amount of anxiolytic (midazolam) and pain killer (fentanyl) is given before the eye block as some patients are anxious about eye injection (and not the operation?!) . The injections can be a little sore but this is for maybe 15 seconds as the injection spreads within the tissue plains. Then patient has a numb eye that can't move for several hours with better immediate pain relief.

Often the surgeons find it easier to delicate this to anaesthetist rather than supervising nurse giving sedation.

Private cataracts are a production line, everything done to allow as many Operations to be completed in a set time.

(if you are fit and well, the risks from general anaesthesia are very low for this type of operation)



(I have some experience. Not all here work in tech fields)

11826 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3832

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2080855 29-Aug-2018 15:37
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

kingdragonfly: I see several misconceptions in the posts above.

Lasik is nothing like cataracts surgery. I've had both types of surgery.

Lasik uses a laser which tracks the eyes many times a second, hence no need to paralyze eye muscles, or prevent blinking. The laser is simply reacts faster than a even a blink.

First cataract surgery is the most common surgery in the world, so not to worry. recovery is also fast, with some people literally driving home unattended the same day (not recommended).

With cataract surgery, the surgeon sucks out the lens with a small vacuum and two tiny incisions (but not the aqueous humour, the "eyeball juice"). You can see the surgery on Youtube, if you're not squeamish. Personally I found it less stressful to see what would happen.

I'd recommend avoiding general anaesthesia, being "knocked out" if you're not a child, or have mental problems. Ignoring the fact that it's more expensive than local "you're awake" anaesthesia, there's a small chance of dying while knocked out, which happened to a friend of mine.

Your eye muscles are paralyzed, and the lids are kept open with a device, that looks like something from the movie "Mechanical Orange." While it looks unpleasant, it's painless.

Costs also seem off. I paid private 3,480.70 which included a more expensive multifocal lens, the Comfort MF20 Intraocular Lens. It did not include the anaesthesiologist. An eye scan cost $200, and the anaesthesiologist cost $460, for a total of $4,140.70 for one eye

http://www.oculentis.com/lentis-mplus-x.html

In my case, surgery went wrong, through no fault of the surgeon. I was in the 0.01% of people who had multiple complications; someone has to have bad luck. When the surgeon detect a problem, he stopped. I was still under topical anaesthesia, and we discussed how to move forward. Everything worked out in the end.

I won't name the surgeon, because as I say, it wasn't his skills; it was my genetics.

The upside of being under topical anaesthesia is he continued the operation, which only took about 20 minutes longer than the usual 30 minutes.

 

 

 

Obviously different.

 

 

 

The surgeon who did my LASIK also does cataract surgery and if @Rikkitik wants a personal recommendation for a surgeon, I would certainly recommend Mr Hall at least in so far as having a consultation to discuss your particular surgical needs. Clearly I can't speak to his skill as a cateract surgeon but no doubt the internet can assist.






7170 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3739


  Reply # 2081017 29-Aug-2018 19:26
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

kingdragonfly: 

The upside of being under topical anaesthesia is he continued the operation, which only took about 20 minutes longer than the usual 30 minutes.

 

This seems long.  Surgeon advised my FIL yesterday that the procedure should take no longer than 10 minutes.  In his case everything is routine.  Claimed chance of complications is about 1 in 100.

 

If/when I need something like this - I reckon I'd be a terrible patient.  I had to get a piece of something removed from my eye years ago, no sedation didn't help, but having a registrar poking an assortment of things from magnets (hoping it was a bit of ferrous metal), that failing then digging whatever it was out with more or less a sewing needle while you've got to not flinch and look straight at the thing while he's poking around wasn't a lot of fun.  Painless - but a little terrifying.


Mad Scientist
18912 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2457

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2081060 29-Aug-2018 19:31
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Fred99:

 

kingdragonfly: 

The upside of being under topical anaesthesia is he continued the operation, which only took about 20 minutes longer than the usual 30 minutes.

 

This seems long.  Surgeon advised my FIL yesterday that the procedure should take no longer than 10 minutes.  In his case everything is routine.  Claimed chance of complications is about 1 in 100.

 

 

depends on where you count the time? takes me 2 whole days to fly to australia.


7170 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3739


  Reply # 2081070 29-Aug-2018 19:45
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Batman:

 

takes me 2 whole days to fly to australia.

 

 

Yeah - but Jetstar have cheap tickets.


1400 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 693


  Reply # 2081079 29-Aug-2018 20:14
Send private message quote this post

Fred99: Claimed chance of complications is about 1 in 100.


I don't really want to go into details, but I had the 1 in 100 complication, plus a different 1 in a 100 complication beforehand.

As I said no surgery is without risk, but cataract surgery is the most common surgery in the world. With an aging population, it's a growth industry.

Mad Scientist
18912 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2457

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2081098 29-Aug-2018 20:50
Send private message quote this post

Fred99:

 

Batman:

 

takes me 2 whole days to fly to australia.

 

 

Yeah - but Jetstar have cheap tickets.

 

 

But I never fly Jetstar. 


1 | 2 | 3 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.