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  Reply # 2084166 5-Sep-2018 08:54
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Just a general comment - having spent a weekend with a group of (mainly young) people who've decided that they've all got "special food requirements" for either ethical or self-diagnosed health reasons.  I've never heard so much unscientific BS in my life.  I've been told that honey is really very healthy okay but sugar is poison/white death, had to deal with people who believe that dairy products will kill you - to the extent that a trace of milk left on a steaming wand on an espresso machine will cause them dire health effects.  That processed food is very very bad for you, but they never read the label on their soy or so-called "almond milk".  The vegans were all obese - every single one of them.  I quite liked some of the food - they made some stuff actually taste like food, caused extreme flatulence, but they're right - my farts didn't stink.  I presume they were all obese for a couple of reasons, one is that they're so fixated on the idea of "healthy food" that they think that's the single answer to everything - so they don't bother with exercise, the other being that they eat tonnes of sugar (even if it's "natural" sugar - whatever than means) and masses of carbs - even if that's from pea flour or beans or whatever.

 

I did manage to escape to visit an old friend - who's 75, eats what she wants, is fit, extremely healthy, still works full time as a health professional.  We ducked out to a restaurant for lunch, ate gourmet burgers full of meat, put a teaspoon of sugar in our coffees.  It was extremely refreshing to be able to enjoy a meal without hearing comment about how it was either going to kill us dead on the spot or make us live forever.  Food discussion was limited to "how's your burger" - "really nice".

 

 


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  Reply # 2084167 5-Sep-2018 08:57
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LOL! Those vegans probably look obese because they're bloated like balloons with all the global warming methane gas their guts are churning out!

 

 


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  Reply # 2084216 5-Sep-2018 10:29
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freitasm:

 

Technofreak:

 

I used to have sugar in my tea, I stopped doing it and while I noticed it for a short while it didn't take long before I wasn't missing it. Used to add sugar to my weetbix as well but don't do that any more either.

 

I stopped using sugar on coffee (espressos, flat white and cafe au lait) about 20 years ago. 

 

I need no sugar in a decent coffee, but a lousy/bitter one I do. The requirement for sugar is my yard-stick for judging how good a coffee is. I weaned my self off it by slowly using less and less, rather than going full cold turkey. If I don't have a decent breakfast I find myself craving sugar in my coffee for the energy, so I reckon a your food eating habits can affect how hard it is to drop sugar. 


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  Reply # 2084234 5-Sep-2018 10:47
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tripper1000:

 

I need no sugar in a decent coffee, but a lousy/bitter one I do.

 

 

Ditto, I always add to filter coffee provided at conferences.

 

Like you, I weaned myself off sugar in hot drinks.  I used to have two sugars in tea and coffee.  Took me about a year to wean myself off completely.  Now - I dislike sweet stuff.

 

I think so much sugar is used in processed foods because sugar is such cheap ingredient - ditto salt.

 

I have a mate who is a nutritionist and food scientist.  In her view, one of the most useful ways to reduce sugar in processed foods is to reduce salt.  In savoury food if you reduce salt, you reduce sugar to keep flavour balanced.   If manufacturers do this in stages, customers don't notice a difference in taste.

 

According to my friend, this has already been done by manufacturers in the UK.  NZ has significantly more sugar and salt than in UK/Europe.  I haven't verified this myself. But, she is an expert who has worked in the field in both countries, so I'm inclined to believe her. 





Mike

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  Reply # 2092088 17-Sep-2018 17:40
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freitasm:

 

Technofreak:

 

I used to have sugar in my tea, I stopped doing it and while I noticed it for a short while it didn't take long before I wasn't missing it. Used to add sugar to my weetbix as well but don't do that any more either.

 

 

I stopped using sugar on coffee (espressos, flat white and cafe au lait) about 20 years ago. 

 

 

Ditto.  I used to have three.  The next step down that road is to stop putting the milk in.  Milk has sugar in it (lactose) and is generally just there to cover the nasty taste of nasty coffee.  Any coffee you drink black has to be good coffee.


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