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211 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 2120051 5-Nov-2018 11:05
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While deemed medically useless they have benefitted me somewhat. I have my four wisdom teeth and have lost the odd molar over the years and the wisdom teeth have moved in quite nicely to the point where there is not even a gap for one of the molars.


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 2120055 5-Nov-2018 11:09
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I had all for wisdom teeth removed two years ago. cost a bit under $3000.

 

The first few days with the high strength pain killers were uncomfortable but not very painful. I couldn't eat much on day one but it got easier each day. the second week I switched to normal pain killers and went back to work - that was awful, the jaw pains sent me home early and I didn't get much done that week. By week 3 the pain was gone but the discomfort, eating carefully, and washing out the gunk (gross!) went on for another few weeks. 


 
 
 
 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2120153 5-Nov-2018 13:08
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I hadn't realized there was a health and fitness section, sorry about posting in the wrong place.


defiant
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  Reply # 2120186 5-Nov-2018 13:12
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Had my tops taking out, one of them was fused to the bone so that took quite awhile to be pain free. Think it was about a week before I could eat "properly" and not live on soups and scrambled eggs.

 

Every once in a while when I'm cleaning the tooth next to it there's still a bit of sensitivity next to the one that was fused to the bone.

 

Edit: I hope I don't have to get my bottom ones taken out, ever, as they're growing horizontally so it'll be quite the operation to remove them.. sigh


mdf

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  Reply # 2120226 5-Nov-2018 13:29
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Like the OP, I had impacted wisdom teeth that had to be taken out through the side rather than just pulled. All four at once. I didn't have sedation, but was given some pretty strong opiates - I was as high as a kite and felt *great* up until about an hour and a half after surgery. I can totally see how that stuff is addictive.

 

I can however remember the sound of the saw. Which was... unpleasant.

 

But it took a good two weeks before I was back to eating normal food. I was a swollen mess for a week. Panadol did nothing for me, but ibuprofen was good (I have had issues with panadol not doing much in other cases too though).


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2120232 5-Nov-2018 13:32
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Coil:

 

I also had a minor dry socket.. Not a nice experience.

 

I've had three of my four removed. The top two when I was about 19 and I was eating the same day, completely fuss free. Took several minutes. I then had one of the bottom removed that hadn't come through. It would ache when I got sick, and would sort of emerge, then get hidden again so I got it took out. 

 

But I got a dry socket about five days later. I hadn't take any pain relief until that happened and then I got rather distressed when it ran out. A dry socket is basically the stitches or scab falling out and the nerve is exposed. It was awful. But fixed instantly (I was on the road for work, had a five hour drive to Nelson where it was possibly the worst pain I've experienced). The dentist in Nelson just nicked the side with a scalpel to fill it with blood and stitched it back up. 


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  Reply # 2120262 5-Nov-2018 14:29
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mdf:

 

I can however remember the sound of the saw. Which was... unpleasant.

 

 

This has to be the best thing about sedation.  I've had dental work done under nitrous, which helps with the anxiety, but wears off quite quickly and the crash is really bad.  With sedation, you're conscious and compliant, but you don't see or hear anything that you remember.  It's the weirdest thing, having this gap in my memory (which is normally really good), but I honestly can't recall the sound of any instrumentation through these operations.  And coming off the sedation is a lot gentler...


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2120340 5-Nov-2018 16:35
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Nurofen (Ibuprofen) which is a Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) is your best friend mainly due to its "Anti-inflammatory" properties. It also attacks pain differently than paracetamol which only dampens pain signals to the brain. NSAID's inhibit the activity of the enzymes that lead to pain, inflammation and fever being produced. You can take Nurofen and Paracetamol together but make sure you take Nurofen with food or a good glass of milk as it can be rough on the old tummy and of course always follow the dosage stated on the packaging.

 

If you still have pain or other problems (e.g. bleeding), especially after two weeks, get yourself off to your GP or ED.

 

Get well soon.





iMac 27" (late 2013), Airport Time Capsule + Airport Express, iPhone7, iPad6, iPad Mini2

 

Panasonic Blu-ray PVR DMR-BWT835 + Panasonic Viera TH-L50E6Z, Chromecast Ultra


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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 2122505 9-Nov-2018 07:38
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I had the bottom two impacting (pointing forward) which had the potential to crowd up my other teeth. Decision was made to take the top two out as well as they "seldom ever come out straight" Lol. Pretty straight forward procedure with cutting of the gum required as the top two hadn't surfaced yet. The specialist started explaining the procedure {drill through the tooth, put a bar through and then lever the tooth out). I had to stop him and say "I honestly don't want to know how you do it :-)

 

So around 18 months later and I'm living in a different city. Felt something sharp at the back of a molar with my tongue. Fearing that I had chipped the tooth, I went to a local dentist. He grabbed his tweezers and proceeded to remove a sliver of tooth that had worked it's way up and out through my now healed gum. He said that most likely one of the wisdom teeth broke up while being removed and this bit was missed. He joked that he wouldn't charge me for a tooth extraction as it was only part of it... He was really good and didn't charge me at all (I wonder if he is still in business).

 

The specialist gave me a syringe arrangement (without a sharp end) to flush the sockets with warm salty water, especially after eating. 

 

All the best with your recovery!


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  Reply # 2122512 9-Nov-2018 07:56
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I've also got my bottom two impacting, but thankfully they are staying put so they won't be getting removed. Quite disturbing seeing that on the x-ray, they are perfectly horizontal reminding me of a bowling ball ready to take out the pins. Seems to be a bit of a design flaw.


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  Reply # 2122515 9-Nov-2018 08:00
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Lizard1977:

 

mdf:

 

I can however remember the sound of the saw. Which was... unpleasant.

 

 

This has to be the best thing about sedation.  I've had dental work done under nitrous, which helps with the anxiety, but wears off quite quickly and the crash is really bad.  With sedation, you're conscious and compliant, but you don't see or hear anything that you remember.  It's the weirdest thing, having this gap in my memory (which is normally really good), but I honestly can't recall the sound of any instrumentation through these operations.  And coming off the sedation is a lot gentler...

 

 

 

 

I was put under general for mine, All I remember is some young nurse playing with my phone taking photos of me and the next thing i recall is sucking on an iceblock for a second, getting up then walking forward and somewhat falling over. The next thing I recall is getting in the fathers car then sitting on the couch at my flat and everyone laughing at me. 





 




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2122523 9-Nov-2018 08:25
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I've been making decent progress I think with my recovery. I still have a little bit of pain, but it's totally manageable. I've not been able to fully open my jaw, due to pain on the left side (the side that hadn't erupted). Yesterday while eating some normal ish food, I opened my jaw a bit more than I had been, and something popped and felt immediately better. Since then I've been able to fully open my jaw without any additional pain, so I'm figuring my jaw may have been slightly out of alignment which was causing more discomfort. Aside from that, things have been good, and slowly getting better. I'd been avoiding eating much due to the additional pain while eating, but that seems to have been fixed with the pop yesterday. The right side is completely pain free, which is awesome.


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  Reply # 2122552 9-Nov-2018 09:16
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Coil:

 

Lizard1977:

 

mdf:

 

I can however remember the sound of the saw. Which was... unpleasant.

 

 

This has to be the best thing about sedation.  I've had dental work done under nitrous, which helps with the anxiety, but wears off quite quickly and the crash is really bad.  With sedation, you're conscious and compliant, but you don't see or hear anything that you remember.  It's the weirdest thing, having this gap in my memory (which is normally really good), but I honestly can't recall the sound of any instrumentation through these operations.  And coming off the sedation is a lot gentler...

 

 

 

 

I was put under general for mine, All I remember is some young nurse playing with my phone taking photos of me and the next thing i recall is sucking on an iceblock for a second, getting up then walking forward and somewhat falling over. The next thing I recall is getting in the fathers car then sitting on the couch at my flat and everyone laughing at me. 

 

 

I know several people who had dental work done under a general anaesthetic who said they come out of the procedure feeling like they'd been beaten up.  A dentist explained that this is because the person is completely out of it, they don't have to be quite so gentle (this was a while ago - methods have undoubtedly improved since then!).  I'm very grateful to not have had any dental work under general - the conscious sedation is so much better.

 

However, I did have a root canal under nitrous which was "funny."  My future wife came with me and sat in the chair opposite while the dentist did his thing.  Apparently (I don't really recall it), I was a barrel of laughs while he worked, doing my best to entertain my audience with funny hand gestures.  After he finished, I strolled out, paid the receptionist and waved away the offer of a taxi (my then girlfriend couldn't drive), saying we'd walk home (~3kms away).  I made it about 500m before the nitrous wore off and I had to stumble to a bus stop and catch the bus home.

 

Yeah - nitrous sucks... :)


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  Reply # 2122572 9-Nov-2018 10:08
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I think the pain/healing time is also related to how old you are

 

The younger you get it done the better

 

I put it off (4 removed incl impacted ones) till my late 30s and regret waiting so long




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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2122577 9-Nov-2018 10:18
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nathan:

 

I think the pain/healing time is also related to how old you are

 

The younger you get it done the better

 

I put it off (4 removed incl impacted ones) till my late 30s and regret waiting so long

 

 

Unfortunately, I'm in my late 30's so it will probably take a good long while longer than it would have had I had them yanked when I was a kid.


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