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  Reply # 2192091 6-Mar-2019 12:29
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Rikkitic:

 

unceremoniously dumped on the street to find my own way home.

 

 

This is what Police and Hospitals will happily do. How do they expect to remove someone from their residence or area and then dump them in a completely different area with no way home or assistance if they cannot find their way..


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  Reply # 2192484 6-Mar-2019 18:54
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And then there was 10..

 

Now recommending bringing infant shots forward (it's always been an option on case by case basis)

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/111085338/ten-confirmed-measles-cases-in-canterbury-prompts-early-vaccine-call 


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2192560 6-Mar-2019 21:12
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What I don't understand is how children who are able to be vaccinated (some medically can't) are allowed to be in early childhood education centres or schools where they are a hazard to other children?

 

If a child had nut allergies we rightly wouldn't allow all the other kids to bring peanut butter sandwiches, as they could literally kill the child with the allergy. Yet some kids with conditions like leukemia and egg allergies can't have some or all vaccines, and for some kids the vaccine doesn't work effectively, and these kids are at extreme risk if unvaccinated children mix with them and give them a condition such as measles. And an infant dying of measles is a truly terrible thing to witness.

 

Personally, I accept a parents right to decide on whether medical treatment should be provided to their children in *most* circumstances. However, I think if a child is able to be vaccinated and isn't then they are a hazard to other children. On this basis they shouldn't be allowed into a early childhood centre, and should have to do their schooling by correspondence. Otherwise they could literally kill other children.


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  Reply # 2192750 7-Mar-2019 08:32
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JimmyH:

 

What I don't understand is how children who are able to be vaccinated (some medically can't) are allowed to be in early childhood education centres or schools where they are a hazard to other children?

 

If a child had nut allergies we rightly wouldn't allow all the other kids to bring peanut butter sandwiches, as they could literally kill the child with the allergy. Yet some kids with conditions like leukemia and egg allergies can't have some or all vaccines, and for some kids the vaccine doesn't work effectively, and these kids are at extreme risk if unvaccinated children mix with them and give them a condition such as measles. And an infant dying of measles is a truly terrible thing to witness.

 

Personally, I accept a parents right to decide on whether medical treatment should be provided to their children in *most* circumstances. However, I think if a child is able to be vaccinated and isn't then they are a hazard to other children. On this basis they shouldn't be allowed into a early childhood centre, and should have to do their schooling by correspondence. Otherwise they could literally kill other children.

 

 

Just because someone is not vaccinated, it does not mean they are a walking killing machine. 
As others have said before, just because you have had a vaccination, it also doesn't make you completely immune and if the herd immunity is strong then the chances of something developing and spreading is very small. So those ones which medically can't have it done are generally pretty safe and of no concern.


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  Reply # 2192803 7-Mar-2019 08:58
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Due to this outbreak in Canterbury I am going to see if I can get my three year old daughter her second MMR vaccine. It's scheduled for age four but as per the recommendations in Canterbury it can be brought forward. I'm in Wellington but it wouldn't surprise me if there was an outbreak here.





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All comments are my own opinion, and not that of my employer unless explicitly stated.


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  Reply # 2192823 7-Mar-2019 09:33
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There seems to also be a group of 'older' folk on media comments saying 'so why is it such a big deal after being born after 69 - it was no big deal when I was young we all had it - scaremongering'

 

Does anyone else facepalm at such things.

 

If you break it down it gets kinda... clearer. Well, to my untrained eye at least. First vaccinations for it were shipped after 69. Prior it was SO rampant you are 'presumed' to have likely been exposed. But it was at debilitating levels. Within the first couple of years when it was monitored appears numbers dropped from the 900,000 levels to 250,000 in an attempt to get rid of it

 

CT Scan machines weren't introduced until around 74. Not actually in enough numbers and usable till the 80s. So anything prior noone would likely have had any ideas what elevated fever levels could do to the brain?

 

 

 

Looking at numbers from the 2017-Jul 2018 range. There was around 48 cases (mixture of infection types). All of a sudden, were almost half that already this year...




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  Reply # 2192832 7-Mar-2019 09:49
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Oblivian:

There seems to also be a group of 'older' folk on media comments saying 'so why is it such a big deal after being born after 69 - it was no big deal when I was young we all had it - scaremongering'


Does anyone else facepalm at such things.


If you break it down it gets kinda... clearer. Well, to my untrained eye at least. First vaccinations for it were shipped after 69. Prior it was SO rampant you are 'presumed' to have likely been exposed. But it was at debilitating levels. Within the first couple of years when it was monitored appears numbers dropped from the 900,000 levels to 250,000 in an attempt to get rid of it


CT Scan machines weren't introduced until around 74. Not actually in enough numbers and usable till the 80s. So anything prior noone would likely have had any ideas what elevated fever levels could do to the brain?


 


Looking at numbers from the 2017-Jul 2018 range. There was around 48 cases (mixture of infection types). All of a sudden, were almost half that already this year...



Survivorship bias. I, too, was curious about the significance of 1969. Indeed, that's when the vaccine was introduced in NZ, and yes, before that measles was rampant and you are therefore considered to be highly likely to have been exposed to the virus.

In other words, if you were born before 1969 and you are still alive then you are deemed to have been exposed to the virus and it didn't kill you (unlike the rest of your cohort).

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  Reply # 2193199 7-Mar-2019 19:46
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  Reply # 2193607 8-Mar-2019 14:34
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https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/07/health/measles-josh-nerius/index.html

CNN: Anti-vaxers' adult son gets measles; now, he has this message for the world
...
Joshua went to the emergency room, where a doctor said it looked a lot like the measles. Had he been vaccinated as a child?

Nerius texted the question to his mother. She sent back a thumbs-down emoji.

His next stop was an isolation room at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

Nerius became so weak that at one point, he couldn't walk without assistance. He lost 25 pounds. It took months to fully recover.

"I felt horrible," he said. "It took a serious toll."

He thinks about the current measles outbreak, which started in Washington state, where dozens of children have suffered because their parents chose not to vaccinate them.

He knows that their suffering -- and his own three years ago -- could have been avoided.

"It makes me so angry. My parents thought they were doing the right thing. They were persuaded by the anti-vaxers," he said.
...
A near miss
Nerius remembers the scariest part of his bout with measles.

He contracted the disease in May 2016, at his sister's graduation from that Northern Illinois University College of Business. The Illinois Department of Health later determined that a guest who had traveled to the graduation from outside the United States had the measles, which is highly contagious.

"I didn't interact with anyone at that graduation besides my own family, so it was literally just me walking by someone," he said.

He says the scariest part is that the day after his sister's graduation, before he knew that he'd been infected, he attended a technology convention in Las Vegas with thousands of other people.

"I was shaking hands with hundreds of people a day. I wasn't contagious yet, but it's sobering to think if the timing had been just slightly different, how many people I could have infected," he said.
...

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  Reply # 2193760 8-Mar-2019 16:56
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Measles Explained — Vaccinate or Not?

If you meet someone while you're infectious, there's a 90% chance you'll infected them, unless they were vacinated


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  Reply # 2193800 8-Mar-2019 17:05
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How One Washington State Senator Is Rationalizing The Measles Outbreak



CLARK COUNTY, Washington — The United is currently home to six ongoing measles outbreaks. But with 70 confirmed cases, Clark County, Washington in particular, has gotten a lot of attention. It’s quickly become a classic example of what happens when parents hesitate to vaccinate their children. Still, the spread of a highly contagious and sometimes deadly disease hasn’t been enough to change everyone’s minds about vaccines.

Washington State Senator Lynda Wilson told VICE News during a recent interview that she believes the measles vaccine has caused more harm than the disease itself — a statement that has been debunked by multiple peer-reviewed studies, including a massive study published this week. She also said she hasn’t actively reached out to any scientists or doctors to verify her opinion on the matter. “I'm kind of busy up here, and so I'm just dealing with what I'm getting from my constituents,” she said.

The measles is a nasty disease that can lead to serious complications, including swelling of the brain and pneumonia. It also kills around 1 or two children out of every 1000 who become infected. That’s why scientists recommend the vaccine, which is both safe and effective. But right now, Clark County has an unusually low vaccination rate.

So, Senator Wilson’s view of vaccines aren’t just emblematic of the crisis — they could also have an impact on upcoming legislation. A proposed bill would eliminate one of Washington’s non-medical vaccine exemptions, the philosophical exemption, and Senator Wilson has already said she plans to vote to keep the exemption. “I don't believe that everyone should be having to do them,” she said, in reference to vaccines.

Despite having vaccinated her own children when they were younger, Wilson doesn’t think parents should be required to do so with their own kids — at least not American parents. “The cases are coming from out of the country,” she said. “So, you know, maybe what we should do is start thinking about requiring vaccinations if you're coming into our country. Maybe they should be vaccinated instead of requiring all of our people to be vaccinated.”

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  Reply # 2193821 8-Mar-2019 17:44
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kingdragonfly: Despite having vaccinated her own children when they were younger, Wilson doesn’t think parents should be required to do so with their own kids — at least not American parents. “The cases are coming from out of the country,” she said. “So, you know, maybe what we should do is start thinking about requiring vaccinations if you're coming into our country. Maybe they should be vaccinated instead of requiring all of our people to be vaccinated.”

 

WTF - Is that first or second or third etc generation American parents. (or the Founding Mothers of America)

 

You really do have to love (in the smallest of fonts) the American hypocrisy!!! AND ignorance by so called educated people.

 

Yea build a Wall All the way Around the big old USA and keep em allll out. Don't let anyone in OR out.





iMac 27" (late 2013), Airport Time Capsule + Airport Express, iPhone7, iPad6, iPad Mini2

 

Panasonic Blu-ray PVR DMR-BWT835 + Panasonic Viera TH-L50E6Z, Chromecast Ultra


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  Reply # 2194701 9-Mar-2019 18:52
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I have had measles twice. Not Rubella.

 

2nd time was at tech, I just thought I was tired from studying late, until the spots arrived.

 

Doc said yes you can get it more than once.

 

All very minor really.

 

 

 

Latest doc said no you can't get it twice, er...but I have.

 

Tetanus, husband was 69, hasn't had tetanus injection since age 57. Told he doesn't need one because it would "see him through" and it lasts longer when old.

 

Nonsense says next one, the over 65s are in need of it especially.

 

 

 

cn't rely on docs, you get one opinion from one, and another from a second. Or third, or fourth.

 

 


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  Reply # 2194711 9-Mar-2019 19:00
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Everything has a life term. And a lot of them are ~20 years. 

 

So they're happy to re-booster those 20-50yr olds as the current census will likely be born during the period only 1 dose was given since the program changed to a booster requirement.

 

Likewise ChickenPox, sticks with you in your spine. Older you get, the lower your defences and they can break through in shingles (I had them at 27 after a breakdown)

 

4 more cases.. so were busting at 20 now I think. Half the 15month stats for last year already.

 

Odd they make a story about frustrated people that theres a shortage suddenly wanting it.. excluding those too young too, it's like everyone whos been fence sitting and avoiding it suddenly wants to


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  Reply # 2194714 9-Mar-2019 19:10
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It's rare, but relapses are possible

I'm sure you know measles has some long-term damage risks, including brain damage, hearing loss, and immune suppression

Sorry to hear you were struck twice.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/1174163

"One attack of measles almost always, but not invariably, confers immunity.

Although second attacks undoubtedly occur, they are very rare. In their extensive experiences,

[Three studies] did not observe a single instance in over 7,000 cases.

A sufficient number of definitely authenticated cases of second attacks has been reported, however, to prove the occasional occurrence."


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