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125 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1671918 16-Nov-2016 12:21
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No problem - just don't thrash it or load it up too hard. Once you get the tank down to half refill with 95/98


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  Reply # 1671925 16-Nov-2016 12:31
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Gambit: Sadly I've filled my Vr4s tank with 91 this morning.
Will anything major happen?
I don't race around so won't be putting the engine under stress.
Hopefully I can use the tank up and put 95 back in.
Any benefit in using 98?

Thanks

 

Try to drive off boost as best you can, I filled my 2000 VR4 with 91 when nothing else was available and it survived.

 

The engine will go into the low octane map when it sense enough knock.

 

As far as octane booster, they are for the most part a complete waste of money and the amount they increase the octane is very small.


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1671951 16-Nov-2016 12:52
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You have the right idea. Be gentle till the fuel is down to about half, then add 98 ( preferable ) or 95.

 

Just wait for the next 7.5 quake to mix. Seriously, normal driving will mix fuels because vehicle tanks tend to be warmer than underground storage tanks, and the density difference is minimal, with higher octane motor fuels are usually slightly more dense.

 

With regard to 98, unless the manufacturer recommends it, or you've modified the engine to take advantage of it, the only benefit is that the additive packages can be superior, removing/preventing deposits.   


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  Reply # 1672008 16-Nov-2016 13:11
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At least it wasn't diesel.




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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1672064 16-Nov-2016 14:08
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Thanks for all the replies everyone.
Very helpful :)

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  Reply # 1672123 16-Nov-2016 14:52
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Side note: In Australia and Canada they sell three grades of petrol and two of those are 'cut' with ethanol. The 'top' grade isn't. 

 

In Canada this sees 87 octane (10% ethanol) 89 octane (5% ethanol) and 91 octane (no ethanol). 

 

They had nothing higher octane than that......so any euro car needing 95 would be SOL unless you pour in some additive to raise the octane every time you fill up. They used to sell that stuff.....I imagine they still do....I haven't paid attention that side of things for literally decades. 





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  Reply # 1672133 16-Nov-2016 15:01
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I have a Peugeot 307 Petrol 2.0L which is recommended to run on 95 octane, so that's what I put in it. My motorcycle a Suzuki GSX650F says to use at least 91 octane unleaded fuel so that's what I use in it. I tried 95 for a wee while in the bike and tracked my fuel economy on fuelly.com and it was no different - the 95 just cost more. 





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1672134 16-Nov-2016 15:02
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We use a different measurement system for octane than the USA:

 

91 AKI Octane (US measure) = 95.5 RON Octane


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  Reply # 1672159 16-Nov-2016 15:20
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Linuxluver:

 

Side note: In Australia and Canada they sell three grades of petrol and two of those are 'cut' with ethanol. The 'top' grade isn't. 

 

In Canada this sees 87 octane (10% ethanol) 89 octane (5% ethanol) and 91 octane (no ethanol). 

 

They had nothing higher octane than that......so any euro car needing 95 would be SOL unless you pour in some additive to raise the octane every time you fill up. They used to sell that stuff.....I imagine they still do....I haven't paid attention that side of things for literally decades. 

 

 

 

 

Both Husky & Mohawk still sell 94 at the pump - in Alberta at least (where they also sell 'summer' fuel and 'winter', a more volatile version).

 

I'm pretty sure most Canadian Premium grades including Esso 'Supreme' and PetroCanada 'Ultra' contain up to 10% ethanol now.

 

 


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  Reply # 1672162 16-Nov-2016 15:28
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Sidestep:

 

Linuxluver:

 

Side note: In Australia and Canada they sell three grades of petrol and two of those are 'cut' with ethanol. The 'top' grade isn't. 

 

In Canada this sees 87 octane (10% ethanol) 89 octane (5% ethanol) and 91 octane (no ethanol). 

 

They had nothing higher octane than that......so any euro car needing 95 would be SOL unless you pour in some additive to raise the octane every time you fill up. They used to sell that stuff.....I imagine they still do....I haven't paid attention that side of things for literally decades. 

 

 

 

 

Both Husky & Mohawk still sell 94 at the pump - in Alberta at least (where they also sell 'summer' fuel and 'winter', a more volatile version).

 

I'm pretty sure most Canadian Premium grades including Esso 'Supreme' and PetroCanada 'Ultra' contain up to 10% ethanol now.

 

 

 

 

US octane and our octane are different, not comparable




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  Reply # 1672165 16-Nov-2016 15:32
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Linuxluver:

 

Side note: In Australia and Canada they sell three grades of petrol and two of those are 'cut' with ethanol. The 'top' grade isn't.

 

Not quite.

 

Here in AU we have 91, 95 and 98 RON just like NZ. None of these are ethanol blends.

 

We also have E10, which is up to 10% ethanol and quite commonly found, but also other Ethanol blends can be found usually at smaller chains like United such as E100 (which is basically 98 with 10% ethanol and a RON of 100).





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  Reply # 1672170 16-Nov-2016 15:46
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My rule of thumb has always been high compression engine use 95/98, low compression engine use 91

 

 

 

But from the AA http://www.aa.co.nz/membership/aa-directions/driver/fuel-duel-2/ this is what they have to say on the matter 

 

 

 

A 2005 assessment estimated that 95% of New Zealand’s cars could operate on 95 octane or less, while 4% of vehicles may benefit from a higher octane fuel, but less than 1% actually require a fuel grade above 95 octane. Few modern vehicles need 98 octane; a small number of older or classic cars do, although many of those can operate happily on 95 octane, with an engine detune.   

 

To see if there was any difference in economy, we ran a car designed to use 91 octane on 15 litres of that grade to measure its fuel consumption and then, when the car had completely run out of fuel and wouldn’t re-start, we refilled it with 15 litres of 95 octane and repeated the route until it too ran out. Our expectation was that, as higher octane fuels contain marginally more energy, there would be a slight improvement. As this was an economy test only, we did not measure performance improvements that motorists may experience with higher octane fuels.  

 

On the day of the test, our test car, a 2010 Suzuki Swift 1.5, travelled 247km on the 91 octane petrol. That’s the equivalent of 6.07 litres per 100km, or 16.46km per litre (see table). On the 95 octane blend, the same car on the same day travelled 256km, or nine kilometres more, for an average economy of 5.86 litres per 100km (3.5% less), or just over 17km per litre. 

 

That’s an improvement on the higher octane fuel, but it costs eight cents per litre more, so how do the costs really compare over a year? For a typical Kiwi motorist travelling 14,000km per year, we estimate the Suzuki driver would consume 850 litres of 91 octane at a total annual cost of $1699, assuming a fixed price of $2.00 a litre for ease of comparison. 

 

If the same driver only used 95 octane, they’d consume 820 litres, at a total cost of $1705 a year. While that’s 30 litres less, the cost is $6.86 more. Although negligible, our test results suggest motorists would receive little or no financial gain by using 95 octane in a car configured to run on 91, despite the improvement in economy. 

 

The next test ran a 2011 Subaru Impreza WRX, designed to use a minimum 95 octane, on 15 litres of that grade until it too ran out, and then the exercise was repeated on 98 octane. On the 95 octane the Subaru travelled 170km, for a fuel economy rating of 8.82 litres per 100km, or 11.33km per litre. On 98 octane it travelled 171km, for a 0.57% improvement in economy.

 

Over 14,000km the Subaru driver would consume 1235 litres of 95 octane petrol at a total cost of $2567 a year, assuming a price of $2.08 a litre. On the pricier 98 octane, they’d consume 1228 litres – just seven litres less – at a total annual cost of $2651, or $84 more. These results suggest that the owner of a car optimized to run on 95 octane would receive no financial benefit from using 98 octane.




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  Reply # 1672212 16-Nov-2016 16:36
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Athlonite:

 

But from the AA http://www.aa.co.nz/membership/aa-directions/driver/fuel-duel-2/ this is what they have to say on the matter 

 

 

 

 

That article was referenced earlier in the thread but is so full of errors and incorrect assumptions as to make it irrelevant. Which is pretty disappointing given it's the AA! They too have fallen for the Octane Misconception.





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  Reply # 1672220 16-Nov-2016 16:51
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ajobbins:

 

Linuxluver:

 

Side note: In Australia and Canada they sell three grades of petrol and two of those are 'cut' with ethanol. The 'top' grade isn't.

 

Not quite.

 

Here in AU we have 91, 95 and 98 RON just like NZ. None of these are ethanol blends.

 

We also have E10, which is up to 10% ethanol and quite commonly found, but also other Ethanol blends can be found usually at smaller chains like United such as E100 (which is basically 98 with 10% ethanol and a RON of 100).

 

 

Thanks. I was going by what I saw around south Brisbane a few months back. I really should check.... :-)  

 

 





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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1672466 16-Nov-2016 23:38
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ajobbins:

 

 

 

That article was referenced earlier in the thread but is so full of errors and incorrect assumptions as to make it irrelevant. Which is pretty disappointing given it's the AA! They too have fallen for the Octane Misconception.

 

 

 

 

That's pretty shocking for a major auto club to publish something like that. To state that higher octane fuels contain more energy is straight out incorrect, especially when ethanol is used as an octane booster.


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