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  Reply # 1001529 9-Mar-2014 00:23 Send private message

johnr:
billgates:
DjShadow: Without knowing the facts yet it reminds me a lot of that Airbus A330 that crashed into the Atlantic Ocean a few years back (flying from Rio to Paris), basically fell from a high altitude.
Really sad, the 777 is still a very safe aircraft


Air France in 2009. It was flying through stormy weather and it was set to Auto Pilot while the pilot was outside the cockpit.


Far more to it than that, The A320 could have flown thru the storm no issues but due to co pilot error the plane lost lift after the pedo tubes gave conflicting INFO about air sped to the co pilot and the captain returned to fly the plane but it was too late to recover



That would be pitot tubes I hope...! I think 'pedo tubes' might be very different things!! ;-)





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  Reply # 1001530 9-Mar-2014 00:28 Send private message

I did a quick Google search before posting that as well, DOH!! Yes I mean ' Pitot tubes '

Hope the police don't show up tomorrow

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  Reply # 1001579 9-Mar-2014 10:05 Send private message

http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/asia/9807399/Kiwi-on-missing-jet-had-embarked-on-new-life



OIL SLICKS SPOTTED

Vietnamese air force planes have spotted two large oil slicks close to where the jet went missing, the first sign that the aircraft had crashed.

The oil slicks were spotted late Saturday off the southern tip of Vietnam and were each between 10 and 15 kilometres long, the Vietnamese government said in a statement.

There was no confirmation that the slicks were related to the missing plane, but the statement said they were consistent with the kinds that would be produced by the two fuel tanks of a crashed jetliner.





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  Reply # 1001599 9-Mar-2014 11:27 Send private message

TimA:
joker97: Apparently it suddenly lost communication at 35,000ft, utter silence with no mayday call

Theories revolve around explosions and causes


Weeks of speculation begin. It last communicated 500FT below cruising altitude.

Apparently it wasn't an old aircraft, lots of older 777s in the worldwide fleet without any hint of problems that could bring down an aircraft without warning.




Qualified in business, certified in fibre, stuck in copper, have to keep going  ^_^

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  Reply # 1001732 9-Mar-2014 14:58 Send private message

Geektastic:
joker97: Apparently it suddenly lost communication at 35,000ft, utter silence with no mayday call

Theories revolve around explosions and causes


Why is it that:

1) Aircraft do not communicate black box data in real time to satellites as they fly?

2) No one seems to know exactly where it was when it vanished and yet they can tell you where your cellphone is? Surely planes can be accurately tracked in real time using satellites?


1) Bandwidth restrictions, I would guess. There are one hell of a lot of planes in the sky, and they'd have to transmit their data a long way. Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really. Getting all that data broadcast in real time would be a hugggge undertaking, with little gain other than convenience.

2) But they are tracked in real time. It's not the satellites doing the tracking, of course. Satellites don't track anything. The planes use GPS to find themselves, then broadcast their location, heading, velocity etc in real time.

Don't believe me? http://www.flightradar24.com/

More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_dependent_surveillance-broadcast

The thing about this flight is that the ADS-B data and radio contact suddenly stopped without any emergency broadcasts - commercial airlines always have at least two emergency beacons, AFAIK one of those should automatically trigger on impact.








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  Reply # 1001734 9-Mar-2014 15:09 Send private message

Another strange discovery is that about 3 or 4 people in the flight manifest were not actually on that flight.

 

They're safe and alive right now. 

 

Their passports were stolen sometimes back and they have reported it.

 

So why MA allowed the people who used it to get through/board is mystery

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  Reply # 1001740 9-Mar-2014 15:12 One person supports this post Send private message

ripdog: ... Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really...

If you can find them.




Sideface


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  Reply # 1001744 9-Mar-2014 15:22

The paper today says the tip of the wing of that plane broke off Aug 9, 2012 after colliding with tail of China Eastern Airlines A340. Nobody was injured in that incident.

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  Reply # 1001931 9-Mar-2014 23:02 Send private message

ripdog:
Geektastic:
joker97: Apparently it suddenly lost communication at 35,000ft, utter silence with no mayday call

Theories revolve around explosions and causes


Why is it that:

1) Aircraft do not communicate black box data in real time to satellites as they fly?

2) No one seems to know exactly where it was when it vanished and yet they can tell you where your cellphone is? Surely planes can be accurately tracked in real time using satellites?


1) Bandwidth restrictions, I would guess. There are one hell of a lot of planes in the sky, and they'd have to transmit their data a long way. Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really. Getting all that data broadcast in real time would be a hugggge undertaking, with little gain other than convenience.

2) But they are tracked in real time. It's not the satellites doing the tracking, of course. Satellites don't track anything. The planes use GPS to find themselves, then broadcast their location, heading, velocity etc in real time.

Don't believe me? http://www.flightradar24.com/

More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_dependent_surveillance-broadcast

The thing about this flight is that the ADS-B data and radio contact suddenly stopped without any emergency broadcasts - commercial airlines always have at least two emergency beacons, AFAIK one of those should automatically trigger on impact.



If they ARE tracked in real time, why are we not reading that they knew EXACTLY where it was when it disappeared as opposed to reading things like "lose contact somewhere off Vietnam" and "may have turned back"?!





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  Reply # 1001933 9-Mar-2014 23:04 Send private message

Sideface:
ripdog: ... Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really...

If you can find them.


And you're happy with just a few minutes of data...

They could send burst transmissions periodically - the number of planes must be a lot smaller than the number of satellite telephone calls being handled every second.





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  Reply # 1001935 9-Mar-2014 23:04 Send private message

When a plane falls out of the sky it does not go straight down

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  Reply # 1001939 9-Mar-2014 23:18 Send private message

ripdog:
Geektastic:
joker97: Apparently it suddenly lost communication at 35,000ft, utter silence with no mayday call

Theories revolve around explosions and causes


Why is it that:

1) Aircraft do not communicate black box data in real time to satellites as they fly?

2) No one seems to know exactly where it was when it vanished and yet they can tell you where your cellphone is? Surely planes can be accurately tracked in real time using satellites?


1) Bandwidth restrictions, I would guess. There are one hell of a lot of planes in the sky, and they'd have to transmit their data a long way. Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really. Getting all that data broadcast in real time would be a hugggge undertaking, with little gain other than convenience.

2) But they are tracked in real time. It's not the satellites doing the tracking, of course. Satellites don't track anything. The planes use GPS to find themselves, then broadcast their location, heading, velocity etc in real time.

Don't believe me? http://www.flightradar24.com/

More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_dependent_surveillance-broadcast

The thing about this flight is that the ADS-B data and radio contact suddenly stopped without any emergency broadcasts - commercial airlines always have at least two emergency beacons, AFAIK one of those should automatically trigger on impact.



As well as transponders there is this system: ACARS.

They had ACARS information from the Air France 447 - quickly giving some hints to the problems which may have caused the crash - a potential problem with the pitot tubes was common knowledge long before the flight data recorders could be recovered.

No word on MH370 - except "all communication was lost". 
Without some information, then there's only speculation - none of it good.







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  Reply # 1001942 9-Mar-2014 23:22 Send private message

Fred99:
ripdog:
Geektastic:
joker97: Apparently it suddenly lost communication at 35,000ft, utter silence with no mayday call

Theories revolve around explosions and causes


Why is it that:

1) Aircraft do not communicate black box data in real time to satellites as they fly?

2) No one seems to know exactly where it was when it vanished and yet they can tell you where your cellphone is? Surely planes can be accurately tracked in real time using satellites?


1) Bandwidth restrictions, I would guess. There are one hell of a lot of planes in the sky, and they'd have to transmit their data a long way. Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really. Getting all that data broadcast in real time would be a hugggge undertaking, with little gain other than convenience.

2) But they are tracked in real time. It's not the satellites doing the tracking, of course. Satellites don't track anything. The planes use GPS to find themselves, then broadcast their location, heading, velocity etc in real time.

Don't believe me? http://www.flightradar24.com/

More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_dependent_surveillance-broadcast

The thing about this flight is that the ADS-B data and radio contact suddenly stopped without any emergency broadcasts - commercial airlines always have at least two emergency beacons, AFAIK one of those should automatically trigger on impact.



As well as transponders there is this system: ACARS.

They had ACARS information from the Air France 447 - quickly giving some hints to the problems which may have caused the crash - a potential problem with the pitot tubes was common knowledge long before the flight data recorders could be recovered.

No word on MH370 - except "all communication was lost". 
Without some information, then there's only speculation - none of it good.








I cannot help but think that there must be a better way in the modern world for knowing where planes are and what is being said on flight decks, what engines and electronics are doing etc than relying on FDR's which remain broadly similar to those being fitted before many of today's pilot's parents had even met!

We have hundreds of satellites and lots of very very clever systems and devices. There absolutely has to be a better way.





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  Reply # 1002079 10-Mar-2014 12:42 Send private message

Geektastic:
Fred99:
ripdog:
Geektastic:
joker97: Apparently it suddenly lost communication at 35,000ft, utter silence with no mayday call

Theories revolve around explosions and causes


Why is it that:

1) Aircraft do not communicate black box data in real time to satellites as they fly?

2) No one seems to know exactly where it was when it vanished and yet they can tell you where your cellphone is? Surely planes can be accurately tracked in real time using satellites?


1) Bandwidth restrictions, I would guess. There are one hell of a lot of planes in the sky, and they'd have to transmit their data a long way. Besides, tough-as-nails flight recorders are all we need, really. Getting all that data broadcast in real time would be a hugggge undertaking, with little gain other than convenience.

2) But they are tracked in real time. It's not the satellites doing the tracking, of course. Satellites don't track anything. The planes use GPS to find themselves, then broadcast their location, heading, velocity etc in real time.

Don't believe me? http://www.flightradar24.com/

More info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_dependent_surveillance-broadcast

The thing about this flight is that the ADS-B data and radio contact suddenly stopped without any emergency broadcasts - commercial airlines always have at least two emergency beacons, AFAIK one of those should automatically trigger on impact.



As well as transponders there is this system: ACARS.

They had ACARS information from the Air France 447 - quickly giving some hints to the problems which may have caused the crash - a potential problem with the pitot tubes was common knowledge long before the flight data recorders could be recovered.

No word on MH370 - except "all communication was lost". 
Without some information, then there's only speculation - none of it good.








I cannot help but think that there must be a better way in the modern world for knowing where planes are and what is being said on flight decks, what engines and electronics are doing etc than relying on FDR's which remain broadly similar to those being fitted before many of today's pilot's parents had even met!

We have hundreds of satellites and lots of very very clever systems and devices. There absolutely has to be a better way.


I totally agree.  I'm sure even basic data transmitted via satellite would have helped leaps and bounds in this case.





Sometimes what you don't get is a blessing in disguise!

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  Reply # 1002093 10-Mar-2014 13:31 Send private message

Geektastic: 

If they ARE tracked in real time, why are we not reading that they knew EXACTLY where it was when it disappeared as opposed to reading things like "lose contact somewhere off Vietnam" and "may have turned back"?!


Because that's the media getting information from a variety of sources and most of them are wrong. For the first 2 days they were saying the flight had been in the air for 2 hours, which every flight tracker in the world knew to be wrong and tried to correct...
Medias motto of "never let anything get in the way of a good story" seems to spring to mind.
Condolences to all the families of those missing.

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