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  # 1051576 23-May-2014 10:12
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Strange that no-one has posted any links.

Unsafe but not illegal. "As with anything, even if it is not illegal, if you are involved in a crash and you injure someone, if it is proven that you were distracted then you could be prosecuted," Mr Knackstedt said."

Another.

Another.

Touching the phone while behind the wheel is likely illegal, even if you're stationary.

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  # 1051594 23-May-2014 10:48
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timmmay: Touching the phone while behind the wheel is likely illegal, even if you're stationary.


Not quite, some other countries have gone that far but NZ law is based on "use".

Around 25 years ago a group of us used to nag a Canadian tourist about riding his bike while listening to his Walkman. He got away with it in NZ but we later heard that he was run down by a truck shortly after arriving back home.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1051614 23-May-2014 10:57
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Bung:
timmmay: Touching the phone while behind the wheel is likely illegal, even if you're stationary.


Not quite, some other countries have gone that far but NZ law is based on "use".

Around 25 years ago a group of us used to nag a Canadian tourist about riding his bike while listening to his Walkman. He got away with it in NZ but we later heard that he was run down by a truck shortly after arriving back home.

If you're seen messing with your (unmounted) phone, you'll more than likely get a ticket unless you can prove you weren't using it (very hard). 

When it comes down to a game of "Yes you were", "No I wasn't" you're going to lose.




Location: Dunedin

 


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  # 1051619 23-May-2014 11:21
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Too many people treat driving as a part time activity even when they are behind the wheel. When I traveled into Wellington everyday I used to see drivers eating breakfast, drinking coffee, using the phone both talking and txting, putting on makeup etc etc  and occasionally driving. I remember one clown I used to see often he would be on the phone and have the Dominion on his steering wheel.

When driving, it should be the sole activity at the time.




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

There is no planet B

 

 


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  # 1051623 23-May-2014 11:30
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I'd class "messing with" as using. I'd hand a phone to the passenger to deal with but Irish law for example includes "A person shall not while driving a mechanically propelled vehicle in a public place hold a mobile phone."

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  # 1051626 23-May-2014 11:35
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KiwiNZ: I remember one clown I used to see often he would be on the phone and have the Dominion on his steering wheel.


Wasn't Richard Prebble was it? He admitted using on an aircraft but successfully sued a journalist that claimed he was reading the paper in traffic by using the "My wife wouldn't have let me" defence.

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  # 1051632 23-May-2014 12:08
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In the scheme of things I doubt headphone use really falls into the category of distraction.  

If you refer to just about any literature on driver distraction cellphone use is way down the list:

     

  1. Inattentive or lost in thought (lets ban all drivers!)
  2. Outside person or object/event (stop looking at the hot babes!) 
  3. Passenger (all cars must be single occupant from now on!)
  4. Phone

http://www.distraction.gov/download/811737.pdf just as an example at hand.

I have yet to see anything on headphone use.  That has more to do with driver senses than distraction.  Certainly not recommended, but then again is it any worse than having the sub-woofer going hard out?  

 









 




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



 
 
 
 


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  # 1053558 26-May-2014 13:25
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I say go for it.

There is no hearing standard for driving so it is obviously not considered a problem.

There is evidence that some deaf people have differences in their retina and better peripheral vision.  However, hearing impairment and blurred vision often go together.  In terms of being legally eligible to drive, people with and without hearing impairment are subject to the same vision tests.

You don't need to hear emergency vehicles approaching, they have lights.  If you look around and watch you will see them, and the behaviour of other drivers  who see them before you will be an obvious sign something is happening.




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  # 1053564 26-May-2014 13:32
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if you don't want to be maimed or be summoned to court for maiming someone else's breadwinner, I'd say don't.

if you don't care, then you have the right to do whatever pleases you




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 1053576 26-May-2014 13:40
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total no no.




The little things make the biggest difference.


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  # 1053585 26-May-2014 13:55
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Bung: "A new study from the Monash University Accident Research Center now confirms the risks parents have known anecdotally for years.

Driving with children isn’t just slightly more dangerous; it’s a full 12 times more dangerous, according to the study."

Damned if you do, damned if you don't.



Accidents in cars cause kids, everybody knows that ;-)

I get that you want to filter violence from your kids, that's great, but have you considered that you could relive your youth listening to Danny the Champion of the World or The Hobbit and make a boring commute something that everybody in the car can enjoy? I have 4.5yo twins, we have great conversations in the car and discuss everything from "what shop is that?" to "where is that truck going?". When your kids get older, I hope they don't put on headphones when you're keen to have a conversation. You don't say how old they are, I'm putting my money on any age being the right age to bond.

Driving while distracted makes you 'that guy'.

Don't do it, please.

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  # 1053586 26-May-2014 13:56
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Let's go over the practical differences with headphones with in car speakers

1.  In car speakers emit sound all directions, your ears are not covered by them.  If there is an environmental noise, such as a scream or a horn, it has an equal chance to enter your eardrums.

2.  In ear headphones emit sounds directly into your ear drums, your ears are totally covered by them.  If there is an environmental noise, such as a scream or a horn, it has a far lesser chance of being loud enough to get past your headphones that block your ear canals.

Have you ever tried to talk to a teenager with headphones in?  It takes about 3 shouts to get their attention.

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  # 1053598 26-May-2014 14:11
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I think if you are doing anything in your car, aprt from driving, and you get into a crash, that other activity could be seen as causing a distraction. eg eating, shaving, putting a cd into the radio, adjusting GPS, listening to audio books on the radio or talkback(it puts some people to sleep). I think some of these activities can be pretty distracting, especailly GPS's, which  personally find quite distracting.

 

I was once told off by a police office for having an ear bud from my ipod in one of my ears, and he told me it was illegal. It was just a warning, and  I didn't argue or disagree with him. You don't want to get in a conflict with these people.

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  # 1053847 26-May-2014 19:03
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mckenndk: I would not recommend wearing headphones while driving, people walking with headphones on are not aware of their surroundings.
I don't understand cyclists that do it either as they can't hear if a car is coming behind them etc so I would not recommend them for driving, will you hear that police car or ambulance wanting to get past or your kids in the back if they need something sorted out.

That's my opinion anyway.

If your not the driver then no problem.


How do deaf people get on then when driving, walking, cycling  etc??




Regards,

Old3eyes




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  # 1053864 26-May-2014 19:40
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gundar:
Bung: "A new study from the Monash University Accident Research Center now confirms the risks parents have known anecdotally for years.

Driving with children isn’t just slightly more dangerous; it’s a full 12 times more dangerous, according to the study."

Damned if you do, damned if you don't.



Accidents in cars cause kids, everybody knows that ;-)

I get that you want to filter violence from your kids, that's great, but have you considered that you could relive your youth listening to Danny the Champion of the World or The Hobbit and make a boring commute something that everybody in the car can enjoy? I have 4.5yo twins, we have great conversations in the car and discuss everything from "what shop is that?" to "where is that truck going?". When your kids get older, I hope they don't put on headphones when you're keen to have a conversation. You don't say how old they are, I'm putting my money on any age being the right age to bond.

Driving while distracted makes you 'that guy'.

Don't do it, please.


I did mention after the OP truth art my kids are 5 and 2. I actually do play lots of games with them, and a share audiobook is a great idea, thanks!

BUT, when travelling with SWMBO (2-3 days/w) the kiddie music that they love so repetitiously drives me 'To distraction' and since Mum's just sitting there playing along, AFAIcare she can deal with any yelling and screaming too!

Which leaves me at "if it's legal and she's ok with it, why NOT?"

Though thanks again for the lively discussion peeps!

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