Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 
263 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 48


  Reply # 1088664 14-Jul-2014 14:50
Send private message

I've seen a post (That I can't find anymore) where a load of these "Red light cameras" had their SIM cards stolen, apparently they were easy to get to... It was somewhere in Europe I think.





452 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 107

Trusted

  Reply # 1089806 16-Jul-2014 10:48
2 people support this post
Send private message

Speed is not the issue per se. It's speeding when driving conditions are not suitable.
Many European countries have speed limits of 130kmh, and even if they are lower, the average cruising speed is close to 130.
In the US, most interstates are limited to 70/75mph (112/120kmh) and yet most people still drive 80mph (128kmh)

NZ has one of the lowest speed limits in the world however NZ also some problems to deal with:
- windy roads with unsuitable speed limits (I would get rid of the blanket 100kmh open roads limit tomorrow and replace it by speed limits per section)
- narrow roads with insufficient room to overtake (I suggest upgrading most of the densely trafficated stretches to the Scandinavian 2+1 road system)
- a general "lazy" driving attitude.. not pointing the finger but lots of folks drive around in their automatics, 1 arm out of the window whilst sipping coffee or smoking a fag (equals no concentration on environment or other road users)
- city drivers not adapted to rural conditions (when people cruise into the countryside for holidays or to visit friends/relatives)

On dual carriage ways that are built to 21st century standards (wide lanes, wide hard shoulder, new tarmac, latest safety features such as guard rails and lighting) it would be perfectly sensible to allow a 110kmh (or potentially even 120kmh) limit to relieve the psychological frustration of always having to drive slow. Cars have modernised and so have the roads so where restricting on one hand, give a favour back as well

What I am completely opposed against though, are nutters that speed in urban areas. Doing 80 or even 100 in a 50 is far more lethal than doing 120 on a 100 stretch.
Hopefully these cameras will be focussed on such areas rather than generic "revenue generation" along straight stretches of road.





Gigabit


1 | 2 | 3 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

New Zealand hits peak broadband data
Posted 18-Jan-2018 12:21


Amazon Echo devices coming to New Zealand early February 2018
Posted 18-Jan-2018 10:53


$3.74 million for new electric vehicles in New Zealand
Posted 17-Jan-2018 11:27


Nova 2i: Value, not excitement from Huawei
Posted 17-Jan-2018 09:02


Less news in Facebook News Feed revamp
Posted 15-Jan-2018 13:15


Australian Government contract awarded to Datacom Connect
Posted 11-Jan-2018 08:37


Why New Zealand needs a chief technology officer
Posted 6-Jan-2018 13:59


Amazon release Silk Browser and Firefox for Fire TV
Posted 21-Dec-2017 13:42


New Chief Technology Officer role created
Posted 19-Dec-2017 22:18


All I want for Christmas is a new EV
Posted 19-Dec-2017 19:54


How clever is this: AI will create 2.3 million jobs by 2020
Posted 19-Dec-2017 19:52


NOW to deploy SD-WAN to regional councils
Posted 19-Dec-2017 19:46


Mobile market competition issues ComCom should watch
Posted 18-Dec-2017 10:52


New Zealand government to create digital advisory group
Posted 16-Dec-2017 08:47


Australia datum changes means whole country moving 1.8 metres north-east
Posted 16-Dec-2017 08:39



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.