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  Reply # 1208165 4-Jan-2015 21:01
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i've used hyper drive for tires. they have have online store, you might find what you need.

p.s. there's huge problem in NZ when company has website, products, but NO price and they never answer email :(






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  Reply # 1208179 4-Jan-2015 21:27
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most tyre companies dont list prices as its such a competitive industry

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  Reply # 1208192 4-Jan-2015 21:52
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joker97:
qwertee: I do apologise for this post and a possible hi-jack of this thread, but could someone else explain what the second para means.
I was tempted to get this warranty at one stage


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
the link is http://www.bridgestonetyrecentre.co.nz/tyres/tyre-warranties/
Road Hazard Warranty Not all punctures are repairable. In fact, simply running over a screw in your driveway could damage your tyre beyond repair. Then you can be forced to pay for another new tyre! For just $12.50 per tyre, you can receive Road Hazard Warranty, which will make sure you’re covered for:

  • Free puncture repairs
    Any repairable puncture will be fixed free of charge for the legal tread life of the tyre.

  • Free tyre replacement
    If the tyre can’t be repaired we’ll fit a replacement and you’ll pay nothing within the first 12,000km or 12 months, whichever comes first.

  • Protection for the life of the tyre
    For the remainder of the legal tread life of the tyre (after 12,000km or 12 months), if the tyre can’t be repaired, you will only pay for the tread you’ve used. For example, if you have only used 15% of the legal tread depth you will only pay 15% of the tyre’s current value to replace it. 


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Free tyre replacement,:      so if i have a nail in the side wall (cant be repaired), can I assume that I get a free replacement
and then have to pay the full price after 12 months or 12K kms .     This is not FREE then. I am still paying at some stage?


sounds like a gimmick. without the 12k 12mth clause it's worth it. with it ... not really! what an escape clause!



It is a form of insurance.

When buying all 4 tyres, they are usually happy to include this for free.





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  Reply # 1208198 4-Jan-2015 22:01
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I read it wrong ... I thought no cover after 12 mths ... but if it covers after 12 months by all means it's reasonable. whether you're a gambling man ...



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  Reply # 1208427 5-Jan-2015 11:46
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Tony's have told me (inc fitting):
 - TZ700 $125 each (from $175). Great tyre apparently.
 - Primewell PS880 $84 each (from $114). He said they're a good tyre, meet US and Europe safety standards, but will wear out more quickly.

Tyre shop online have Kumho Solus for $135 each fitted. Given I won't want a cheap tyre saving $50 isn't a big deal, so guess I'll go with the TZ700.




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  Reply # 1208551 5-Jan-2015 13:58
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I got GT radials for my last set, I spoke to my local tyre dealer ( a small company) and said I wanted something with good grip and low road noise. I have been very happy with them and they have worn well. Before that I had a set of Toyo tyres that did 80,000 + km's.


How many KM have you driven since replacing them last?

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  Reply # 1208607 5-Jan-2015 14:49
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I've used Tony's and Discount Tyres here in Auckland and had great service from both.
Best to call around first (as you have done) and tell them you want good tyres rather than cheap tyres.

Last time I got the brand names and models from a couple of sellers (Firestone and Discount I think) and called Tony's with the prices and brands from each, and they beat the best prices by $10 a tyre.

Make sure you get the fitted price - with new valves and disposal of the old tyres. The cheaper places this can all be extra.

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  Reply # 1208623 5-Jan-2015 16:01
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Ive been using Adens Tyres for a while now (or getting people to match their deals)

Been using the Falken ZE912 with good success on 2 modified cars. Mix of daily commuting, open road, and the odd spirited driving session with no kids in the car. Found them to be a good performer for the price.

http://www.adenstyreshop.co.nz/product_info.php?products_id=7424


F
REE DELIVERY !!!

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  Reply # 1208643 5-Jan-2015 16:31
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There are 3 things about tyres that make them "good"
1/rubber compound : soft = good, but wear out more quickly ( this is what you want) 
hard = no grip, squeals a lot, a bit noisy and usually no progression in between traction/ loss of traction/ return of traction especially in wet.

2/the softer better more performance orientated tyres tend to have shorter sidewalls, which is actually not always ideal when it comes to predictability, predictability is much more important than overall grip, think back to the crossply days and you'll remember huge sidewalls and not much but very predictable grip.
Shorter sidewalls give you a more responsive feel , great for turning in and low speed response but when they let go they let go quite quickly, they have less resilience over bumps etc. Either way you are probably stuck with something close to what the manufacturer gave you. Case in point is a friends 350Z that had larger wheels and tyres fitted, was very "snappy", going back to a smaller wheel with a bigger sidewall made the car a "lot" more driveable. Tyre sidewalls have an important suspension function. Consider formula 1 tyres have massive sidewalls.

3/tread pattern ( mainly relevant in the wet) should be wide and run front to back  
Some tyres have tread designed for loose surface grip ( eg rally tyres) and have strong lateral grooves, these are not for water displacement.
Tread has nothing to do with dry grip, in fact a new tyre will have a bit less grip in the dry because it will walk around on or "flex" its longer tread blocks more than an old slicker/worn tyre.

As far as fitting to the front or rear, replace all 4 because, the front and rear tyres should share the same characteristics shouldn't they ?
Since budget is however what people think about a lot, and the predicament will arise, I would ALWAYS fit the deeper treads to the front of the car for the simple reason that the front tyres will have already displaced 90% of the water that the rear tyres are going to displace. Only on the sharpest of bends ( where the car will be slower) will the rear be clearing fresh water that hasn't been displaced by the front tyres. I know some respectable organisations and tyre fitters suggest otherwise but I have to disagree.

Many would probably consider fitting race tyres to a road car an overkill but if you consider their vast capability and the more predictability they give the driver it's amazing that they are not mandatory on road cars. They are often similar pricing to road going variants $200 - $250, the downsides are they flick up stones all day long, use more fuel, make more noise and might only last 80% as many km's ( if you dont abuse them). ( If you do abuse them they will last 1000km)

http://www.palmside.co.nz/product_cid_10866.html

http://www.dunlop.co.nz/tyres_motorsport.aspx?cat=3

Whilst I agree that someones markup does not make a tyre grip the road better "road tyres" are a long way from the capability of a good road going race tyre. This is certainly the direction I'd be heading in if I was concerned with being able to stop/turn quickly on a variety of surfaces and other peoples lives depended on it.

Of course the most important thing you can do with good tyres is ensure they stay on the road surface as often as possible which is why a good set of shock absorbers is absolutely vital.  
 


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  Reply # 1208653 5-Jan-2015 16:53
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Man I'm waiting for the backlash;p

Wait for it ... Wait for it ...

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  Reply # 1208856 5-Jan-2015 22:55
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joker97: Man I'm waiting for the backlash;p

Wait for it ... Wait for it ...


nothing....waste of popcorn



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  Reply # 1208911 6-Jan-2015 07:15
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Tony's recommend new tyres be fitted to the rear -  a change from a year ago when they fitted them to the front. They have a poster in store explaining why, and it's what NZTA recommends. So I let them because I have no position on it. If you want them fitted to the front they ask you to initial or sign a waiver or just their little invoice to disclaim responsibility.

So I'm taking advice from a tyre store and a government department, who took advice from tyre manufacturers, which I think is generally better than advice found online, even though I know you guys generally know a thing or two. I doubt it makes much difference either way.

Of course the half worn tyres (plenty of tred) are now on the front, and the front wears faster, so I'll need to go through it all again in another year or so when they wear through. If I put the new tyres on the front in a year or so they'd be close to even.




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  Reply # 1208992 6-Jan-2015 10:02
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timmmay: Tony's recommend new tyres be fitted to the rear -  a change from a year ago when they fitted them to the front. They have a poster in store explaining why, and it's what NZTA recommends. So I let them because I have no position on it. If you want them fitted to the front they ask you to initial or sign a waiver or just their little invoice to disclaim responsibility.

So I'm taking advice from a tyre store and a government department, who took advice from tyre manufacturers, which I think is generally better than advice found online, even though I know you guys generally know a thing or two. I doubt it makes much difference either way.

Of course the half worn tyres (plenty of tred) are now on the front, and the front wears faster, so I'll need to go through it all again in another year or so when they wear through. If I put the new tyres on the front in a year or so they'd be close to even.


Ditto here, had some crap chinese tyres fitted to my Ralliart Colt (close to no grip wet or dry). Replaced the worst brand\pair with the Falken ZEIX and they recommended them on the rear, due to physics when cornering (weight over front tyres) the rear will step out first.

Anyway shortly after I ended up replacing the front tyres (Westlake's) as the Chinese tyres just didn't cut it for anything other than slow daily town driving. Noisy, no grip, tramlining at speed, just plain dangerous.



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  Reply # 1209108 6-Jan-2015 11:43
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joker97: Man I'm waiting for the backlash;p

Wait for it ... Wait for it ...


haha

turnin makes some very good points and alludes to the fact that most modern cars are over-tyred.

mostly for looks.

some like most fast audis to make up for inherently poor chassis design.

and yes, new tyres on the front, especially with front wheel drive cars where the tyres must not only steer but also transmit power to the road.

authorities recommend rear fitment as a lowest common denominator response, understeer is easier for joe blow to respond to than oversteer.

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  Reply # 1209124 6-Jan-2015 12:10
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turnin:
joker97: Man I'm waiting for the backlash;p

Wait for it ... Wait for it ...


nothing....waste of popcorn


Maybe these guys are not interested ... Oh well

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