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  Reply # 1209822 7-Jan-2015 11:46
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That very much depends on the exact model. For example toyota corolla or Honda jazz would achieve that. A Ford focus probably would be worth 25k if you're lucky

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  Reply # 1209841 7-Jan-2015 12:01
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joker97: That very much depends on the exact model. For example toyota corolla or Honda jazz would achieve that. A Ford focus probably would be worth 25k if you're lucky


What you are buying influences the trade in considerably




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  Reply # 1209842 7-Jan-2015 12:05
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I guess so ... Wish I was rich or have a business!

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  Reply # 1209852 7-Jan-2015 12:21
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KiwiNZ: That has not been my experience


but as you said earlier you get a very competitive tradein on a newer model, this give you a huge advantage when it comes to depreciation over the time you own the vehicle.

so really you are not a good example or the norm in this sort of situation

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  Reply # 1209871 7-Jan-2015 13:09
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My last work car cost $45k new. Sold for $19k. Less than three years old.

As for tires, I haven't bought for awhile but my last were Ecopias. I found the lack of pricing available annoying so I simply bought them from Hyper as they fitted them as well. I rotated tires and only ever bought four at a time.

Someone mentioned earlier a 200kW FWD Honda? Is that one of the newer V6 accords?

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  Reply # 1209894 7-Jan-2015 13:25
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mudguard: My last work car cost $45k new. Sold for $19k. Less than three years old.

As for tires, I haven't bought for awhile but my last were Ecopias. I found the lack of pricing available annoying so I simply bought them from Hyper as they fitted them as well. I rotated tires and only ever bought four at a time.

Someone mentioned earlier a 200kW FWD Honda? Is that one of the newer V6 accords?


How many KMs?

Also I would not accept that trade in allowance, it is surprising the power walking away makes to the deal you will get.




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1209920 7-Jan-2015 14:06
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Over 100k. I do around 5000k a month in my car and rentals. I don't think this was a true trade in as such, rather the option to purchase it off the company (I thought my brother may have been interested in it). In reality it was probably worth less.
I work for a company that purchases vehicles for the leasing arm, so my division leases the vehicles from, erm itself. But we are still concerned with the purchase price and resale.

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  Reply # 1209921 7-Jan-2015 14:15
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mudguard: My last work car cost $45k new. Sold for $19k. Less than three years old.

As for tires, I haven't bought for awhile but my last were Ecopias. I found the lack of pricing available annoying so I simply bought them from Hyper as they fitted them as well. I rotated tires and only ever bought four at a time.

Someone mentioned earlier a 200kW FWD Honda? Is that one of the newer V6 accords?


Yes, 08~12 model with 3.5L v6

FWIW, i had same dilemma as OP, requiring 2x new tyres, given the size (225/50R17) my choice was limited slightly but at the budget end of Bridgestone/Firestone's offerings I was looking at nearly $450 for a pair (RRP $330ish ea)

Due to the usual post Christmas budget constraints and with a bit of help from Google I found some Achilles ATR Sports from Hyper Tires that with the 15% off promo came in for a grand total of $246.50/pr fitted, balanced and on the car.

Archilles are an Indonesian brand, sold around the world, with both bad and good reviews (as you would expect from the interwebz) but overall they seem to hold their own well enough, and so far they drive well being a lot quieter than the Dunlops they replaced. They are a directional pattern, silica compound etc, in fact if you check out their website you will see it is relatively informative and as you would expect a name brand site to be. I'm struggling to see that spending an extra 80% to feel good about buying local product would give me any real world benefit?

I really do question if the "anti cheap tire" brigade are not looking subjectively enough, Im sure most of us can remember the first waves of chinese tires on the local market (think LingLong, Triangle, [insert crazy name here] and they were absolute rubbish, dangerous to drive even in the dry, but these days there is a far wider range of brands available and some should not be tarred by that old brush?




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  Reply # 1209937 7-Jan-2015 14:35
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I got a good price of $125 per tyre, but two tyres still came to about $350. The approx $100 was:
 - $30 to move rear tyres to front and balance
 - $60 for a wheel alignment (they said it was necessary)
 - $25 for tyre insurance (I've used it in the past, wrote a tyre off and they replaced it no hassle/cost)

So they get you one way or another.




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  Reply # 1210011 7-Jan-2015 16:43
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Wade:
mudguard: My last work car cost $45k new. Sold for $19k. Less than three years old.

As for tires, I haven't bought for awhile but my last were Ecopias. I found the lack of pricing available annoying so I simply bought them from Hyper as they fitted them as well. I rotated tires and only ever bought four at a time.

Someone mentioned earlier a 200kW FWD Honda? Is that one of the newer V6 accords?


Yes, 08~12 model with 3.5L v6

FWIW, i had same dilemma as OP, requiring 2x new tyres, given the size (225/50R17) my choice was limited slightly but at the budget end of Bridgestone/Firestone's offerings I was looking at nearly $450 for a pair (RRP $330ish ea)

Due to the usual post Christmas budget constraints and with a bit of help from Google I found some Achilles ATR Sports from Hyper Tires that with the 15% off promo came in for a grand total of $246.50/pr fitted, balanced and on the car.

Archilles are an Indonesian brand, sold around the world, with both bad and good reviews (as you would expect from the interwebz) but overall they seem to hold their own well enough, and so far they drive well being a lot quieter than the Dunlops they replaced. They are a directional pattern, silica compound etc, in fact if you check out their website you will see it is relatively informative and as you would expect a name brand site to be. I'm struggling to see that spending an extra 80% to feel good about buying local product would give me any real world benefit?

I really do question if the "anti cheap tire" brigade are not looking subjectively enough, Im sure most of us can remember the first waves of chinese tires on the local market (think LingLong, Triangle, [insert crazy name here] and they were absolute rubbish, dangerous to drive even in the dry, but these days there is a far wider range of brands available and some should not be tarred by that old brush?



Achilles (no R) STR is not bad in the dry. in the wet you might as well be ice skating. don't ask me how I know or how much it costs to ice skate.

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  Reply # 1210365 8-Jan-2015 09:43
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I really do question if the "anti cheap tire" brigade are not looking subjectively enough, Im sure most of us can remember the first waves of chinese tires on the local market (think LingLong, Triangle, [insert crazy name here] and they were absolute rubbish, dangerous to drive even in the dry, but these days there is a far wider range of brands available and some should not be tarred by that old brush?



The Achilles ATR rates quite well of 101tires.com but as you say it's indonesian.

Ive run Westlake performance tyres recently which are considered one of the better Chinese performance tyres, still no-where near as good as entry level Falken ZEIX ($125 each).

Ive put the Falken ZEIX though its paces on 2 different performance cars, town, open road, wet, dry, twisty roads...hasnt let me down, and the wear seems pretty good as well. They are a nice quite tyre and also have excellent straight line stability.

at $125 for Falken vs $95 for Little known Chinese Brand I know what the smart choice is.



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  Reply # 1210371 8-Jan-2015 09:53
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With new tyres on the rear the car definitely feels different. At speed it's like the direction has changed but the rear of the car takes a bit longer to realise, then it overcorrects. I guess it's because there's more tread on the tyres, but the rear tyres weren't bad before, it's probably gone from 4mm to 8mm of tread. Feels like the weight is being thrown around and is less stable, but the tyres do stick to the road fine.




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  Reply # 1210415 8-Jan-2015 10:37
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timmmay: With new tyres on the rear the car definitely feels different. At speed it's like the direction has changed but the rear of the car takes a bit longer to realise, then it overcorrects. I guess it's because there's more tread on the tyres, but the rear tyres weren't bad before, it's probably gone from 4mm to 8mm of tread. Feels like the weight is being thrown around and is less stable, but the tyres do stick to the road fine.


Check all the tyre pressures just in case. I've had vehicles come in for servicing that have come straight from tyre shops with new tyres fitted and had some of the pressures reading up 50psi on my calibrated gauges.



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  Reply # 1210416 8-Jan-2015 10:39
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Will do thanks. I just use the service station pump.




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  Reply # 1210417 8-Jan-2015 10:45
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clevedon:
timmmay: With new tyres on the rear the car definitely feels different. At speed it's like the direction has changed but the rear of the car takes a bit longer to realise, then it overcorrects. I guess it's because there's more tread on the tyres, but the rear tyres weren't bad before, it's probably gone from 4mm to 8mm of tread. Feels like the weight is being thrown around and is less stable, but the tyres do stick to the road fine.


Check all the tyre pressures just in case. I've had vehicles come in for servicing that have come straight from tyre shops with new tyres fitted and had some of the pressures reading up 50psi on my calibrated gauges.


I have some rules for this handed down from my father (Motor Engineer) Check the pressures after install and never allow the Tyre installer to use air wrenches to put the wheels on, use the wrench provided by the car maker so on the wet night when you have a puncture you will be able to change the wheel.
also, do tyre rotation, and "run in" new tyres.




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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