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  Reply # 1210978 9-Jan-2015 10:01
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scuwp:
tdgeek:
scuwp:
tdgeek:
scuwp: The hybrids are a pretty good balance, but still probably 70/30 towards road riding.  I reckon a hard tail mountain bike (front suspension only) and put some more road going tyres on it (it may come with them as often new ones in that price point don't come with aggressive off-road tyres).  Go anywhere, do anything, no worries.  I would shell out for disk brakes, they don't cost much more and are more reliable, especially in the wet.  Other than that you get what you pay for really.  You do get a lot of bike nowadays for around that $600 - $1000 mark.  

The 27.5" wheels are becoming popular, or a 29" if you are a bit taller on a larger frame.  Budget for a good helmet, gloves, and some hi-vis gear.
    


Cheers

27.5 wheels are 700's?  I see the full road bikes use 23 tyres, and the few I have seen online use 30 or 40. I am 6'1" and not large.

The Merida 10V I mentioned seems to fit in with your reply aside from disk brakes.



No 700's are equivalent to the 29".  It really is personal preference, but for me at first glance something like http://www.evolutioncycles.co.nz/MERIDA-MOUNTAIN-BIKES?product_id=29350.

I
 commute on a full-suspension mountain bike, but then I can only afford 1 bike to do everything.   I ride on a combination of road, hard packed dirt, and hit the trails on the weekend on occasion.  Full suspension is nicer ride but you do lose a tiny bit of pedal power, and it does up the cost slightly.
 


Nice
The Merida 10V is $899 was on sale (Bike Barn is a bit of a Briscoes if you know what I mean) but was reduced to $449 but that ended the day after I decided to geta  bike. This one looks pretty good,   http://www.bikebarn.co.nz/2015-merida-crossway-513.html#description_contents


Yes, looks like a nice beast for intended use.  As mentioned it may take a few days for certain body parts to get use to things ;-)  Cycle pants are definitely worth it for any distance, you can put some shorts over the top if you like, or buy the mountan bike style baggies with the liner.  If you have any thoughts as to hitting the off-road trails I would give the hybrid a miss and go for a proper mountain bike.  The hybrid wheels will get lost in anything more than hard packed dirt.    


The off road use will be dry dirt track paths at worst. Ill check out pants gear too, good thought

There are a couple in the store, Ill pop in tomorrow morning, tks all for the advice



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  Reply # 1210979 9-Jan-2015 10:07
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jonathan18:
tdgeek: YES PLEASE re the harder tyre details that would be excellent


Had my wife check (shows you I was too lazy to bike today!) - they're Schwalbe Marathon Plus http://www.schwalbe.com/en/tour-reader/marathon-plus.html . Not cheap but worth it - and would be cheapest if you purchase them (or whatever) tyre at the time of purchasing the bike - they'll be able to use the tyres on the bike so should give you a decent discount.

Personally, I've had no issue with the comfort of my bike. I think some basic stuff like ensuring the frame's a suitable size, the seat is  the correct height, position and angle (important to avoid neutering yourself!), the handlebars are positioned correctly will help. Merida models have a handlebar that can be changed to vary reach/height; some also come with a basic 'spring'-mounted seat post (which does work surprisingly well to cushion out bumps).



Thanks very much. Ill certainly check that tyre upgrade option. Bike Barn sells those as well


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  Reply # 1211031 9-Jan-2015 11:57
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With bikes it's horses for courses. It comes down to what you want to do with it and as it is with a lot of things you don't really find out what you need/like until you start using the item.

I ride mainly for fitness as I cannot run due to a damaged knee and need a low impact work out. I started off with a Specialized Sirrus hybrid about 8 years ago. Including cleats, bike rack, helmet and shoes gloves etc it was a sub $1000 deal.

Some thing like this http://www.cyclescience.co.nz/webapps/p/103592/345381/936383 

It was a good starting point, it can be fitted with wider or narrow tyres. It came with 700X 28s and I ended up fitting 700 X 23s since I used it solely on road. The reduction in tyre size gave a speed increase of about 4 kph.  So size does matter!!!!

It has no suspension except for the seat post. Hybrids have a wider gap in the forks compared to a road bike which means you can fit wider tyres if you need to.  I've since fitted 700 X 32s (it will take larger) for when I rode the Otago Rail Trail. Also the Hybrids have the clamp rather that the scissor style brake mechanism.  Both use the same brake pads pressing against the rim, however the clamp style are seem more effective.  I don't see the need for disks for road or casual off road work.  They are more complicated (hydraulics cylinders and pistons etc) and potentially meed more maintenance.

As the vast majority of my riding was on the road about 5 years ago I bought a Giant OCR C3 bottom of the line carbon road bike, this is my regular ride now, though I still have the Sirrus which gets used from time to time like the Rail Trail etc.

The Giant is nice to ride, the Carbon frame gives a softer ride than the aluminium framed Sirrus.  I do some long rides, 60 km plus and I used to get numbness in the little fingers and parts of my arms and burning in the bottoms of my feet, this is greatly reduced with the carbon frame.  For short rides the difference if frame won't matter.

Unless you intend to do serious off road stuff I wouldn't even consider shocks front or back.

To sum it up, for general riding about, commuting to work etc a bike like the Sirrus would be a good choice, if you think you might want to do a lot of road riding and take part in events like the Lake Taupo cycle challenge I'd go for a road bike, if it's serious off road riding then a mountain bike would be the go.

Things to consider.

Buy good tyres, then you'll get far fewer punctures.

If you have to repair a puncture or place a tube especially out on the road be doubly sure you don't allow any grit to become lodged between the tube and the tyre.  This will work away and cause another puncture. Also make sure you have removed the cause of the first puncture.  Pieces of glass can be hard to see and find and if left in the tyre will cause more punctures.  Also as already mentioned make sure the rim tape in in good condition and is properly located when changing a tube or tyre.  

Often the seats that come with the bike are inadequate. The original seat on my hybrid made my private parts go numb. I did some research and bought another seat and have had no problems since.  Most seats are rather hard, the only way around it, is to get used to it by riding regularly. Time in the Saddle (TITS) works.!!!!!!!!

Buy a tool pouch to fit under the seat. Also buy some tyre levers.

Carry a spare tube with you, keep it wrapped in a plastic bag to keep it dry and sweat free especially if you put it in your back pocket, otherwise when you go to use it you may find it has perished.

Buy a CO2 inflation device and the CO2 bottles to go with it.  You will find it difficult to pump the tyres much above 50 PSI using a hand pump.  Most tyres will need 60 PSI plus, road tyres need about 115 PSI.

Make sure the bike is the right size and is adjusted for you, seat position up and down, fore and aft and the handles bars are set up for you.

Gloves are very useful, as well as providing a cushion between the handle bars they also protect your hands if you come off the bike.

Proper riding shoes are very good however aren't very practical for commuting. I have mountain bike cleats on my hybrid.  They are a double sided cleat and on one side I have a flat pedal clipped into the cleat so that I can ride with normal shoes.






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  Reply # 1211054 9-Jan-2015 12:23
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Punctures are down to tyres. You will pay more for kevlar or similar reinforced road tyre ($60-$80) ea but it's totally worth it and the tread will last for ages anyway. Avoid knobby tyres if you are road riding they just steal all your speed and make hard going.



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  Reply # 1211069 9-Jan-2015 12:36
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Technofreak: With bikes it's horses for courses. It comes down to what you want to do with it and as it is with a lot of things you don't really find out what you need/like until you start using the item.

I ride mainly for fitness as I cannot run due to a damaged knee and need a low impact work out. I started off with a Specialized Sirrus hybrid about 8 years ago. Including cleats, bike rack, helmet and shoes gloves etc it was a sub $1000 deal.

Some thing like this http://www.cyclescience.co.nz/webapps/p/103592/345381/936383 

It was a good starting point, it can be fitted with wider or narrow tyres. It came with 700X 28s and I ended up fitting 700 X 23s since I used it solely on road. The reduction in tyre size gave a speed increase of about 4 kph.  So size does matter!!!!

It has no suspension except for the seat post. Hybrids have a wider gap in the forks compared to a road bike which means you can fit wider tyres if you need to.  I've since fitted 700 X 32s (it will take larger) for when I rode the Otago Rail Trail. Also the Hybrids have the clamp rather that the scissor style brake mechanism.  Both use the same brake pads pressing against the rim, however the clamp style are seem more effective.  I don't see the need for disks for road or casual off road work.  They are more complicated (hydraulics cylinders and pistons etc) and potentially meed more maintenance.

As the vast majority of my riding was on the road about 5 years ago I bought a Giant OCR C3 bottom of the line carbon road bike, this is my regular ride now, though I still have the Sirrus which gets used from time to time like the Rail Trail etc.

The Giant is nice to ride, the Carbon frame gives a softer ride than the aluminium framed Sirrus.  I do some long rides, 60 km plus and I used to get numbness in the little fingers and parts of my arms and burning in the bottoms of my feet, this is greatly reduced with the carbon frame.  For short rides the difference if frame won't matter.

Unless you intend to do serious off road stuff I wouldn't even consider shocks front or back.

To sum it up, for general riding about, commuting to work etc a bike like the Sirrus would be a good choice, if you think you might want to do a lot of road riding and take part in events like the Lake Taupo cycle challenge I'd go for a road bike, if it's serious off road riding then a mountain bike would be the go.

Things to consider.

Buy good tyres, then you'll get far fewer punctures.

If you have to repair a puncture or place a tube especially out on the road be doubly sure you don't allow any grit to become lodged between the tube and the tyre.  This will work away and cause another puncture. Also make sure you have removed the cause of the first puncture.  Pieces of glass can be hard to see and find and if left in the tyre will cause more punctures.  Also as already mentioned make sure the rim tape in in good condition and is properly located when changing a tube or tyre.  

Often the seats that come with the bike are inadequate. The original seat on my hybrid made my private parts go numb. I did some research and bought another seat and have had no problems since.  Most seats are rather hard, the only way around it, is to get used to it by riding regularly. Time in the Saddle (TITS) works.!!!!!!!!

Buy a tool pouch to fit under the seat. Also buy some tyre levers.

Carry a spare tube with you, keep it wrapped in a plastic bag to keep it dry and sweat free especially if you put it in your back pocket, otherwise when you go to use it you may find it has perished.

Buy a CO2 inflation device and the CO2 bottles to go with it.  You will find it difficult to pump the tyres much above 50 PSI using a hand pump.  Most tyres will need 60 PSI plus, road tyres need about 115 PSI.

Make sure the bike is the right size and is adjusted for you, seat position up and down, fore and aft and the handles bars are set up for you.

Gloves are very useful, as well as providing a cushion between the handle bars they also protect your hands if you come off the bike.

Proper riding shoes are very good however aren't very practical for commuting. I have mountain bike cleats on my hybrid.  They are a double sided cleat and on one side I have a flat pedal clipped into the cleat so that I can ride with normal shoes.




Cheers for the very useful and detailed info, appreciated.

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  Reply # 1211108 9-Jan-2015 13:25
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Ive got a Merida Crossway 100 TFS, paid about $749 on special at Evolution Cycles, for commuting mainly on paved road, also goes fine on grass and light gravel\stone paths. being large narrow 700C wheels with a mild tread pattern it certainly can get upto speed, the gearing is also blanced nicely for hills and high end speed. I can pedal up steep hill with my 15kg toddler on the back.
 

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  Reply # 1211137 9-Jan-2015 14:14
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Before becoming disabled I rode an Avanti Trail bike, I never went on the road with it, too many insane drivers. I had great fun on it and it lasted well. I still have it and one day I intend to be able to use it again.




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  Reply # 1211170 9-Jan-2015 14:32
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heylinb4nz: Ive got a Merida Crossway 100 TFS, paid about $749 on special at Evolution Cycles, for commuting mainly on paved road, also goes fine on grass and light gravel\stone paths. being large narrow 700C wheels with a mild tread pattern it certainly can get upto speed, the gearing is also blanced nicely for hills and high end speed. I can pedal up steep hill with my 15kg toddler on the back.
 


Good to know. I didnt have a budget, but when I saw the Merida 10V from $899 down to $449, I guess $449 was my budget. Dang the sale ended suddenly.

The Crossway 300 is $999 on sale from $1700 ish, and I guess that's similar to your 100. The 300 is 27 speed, front suspension that can be locked which is handy, F+R disks, handy in wet but Im not bothered either way, dunno what the tyres look like, but I now know a little bit of the specs to go for, or not. Ill re read this tonight, then pop into Bike Barn tomorrow, and see what they advise, and re tyre options. The Marathon ones mentioend are $99 each, other standard ones ar $29 or so each. Or I could go standard for a while and practice changing tubes!

As Techfreak mentioned I want to get the best fit. I thought a bike was a bike was a bike, pick a colour and take it home, but I'll make sure my height, inside leg etc are compatible

My concern is being a newbie and buying what I thought was ok, then learning the tech and finding out its not ok for my use.


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  Reply # 1211190 9-Jan-2015 15:03
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tdgeek:
heylinb4nz: Ive got a Merida Crossway 100 TFS, paid about $749 on special at Evolution Cycles, for commuting mainly on paved road, also goes fine on grass and light gravel\stone paths. being large narrow 700C wheels with a mild tread pattern it certainly can get upto speed, the gearing is also blanced nicely for hills and high end speed. I can pedal up steep hill with my 15kg toddler on the back.
 


Good to know. I didnt have a budget, but when I saw the Merida 10V from $899 down to $449, I guess $449 was my budget. Dang the sale ended suddenly.

The Crossway 300 is $999 on sale from $1700 ish, and I guess that's similar to your 100. The 300 is 27 speed, front suspension that can be locked which is handy, F+R disks, handy in wet but Im not bothered either way, dunno what the tyres look like, but I now know a little bit of the specs to go for, or not. Ill re read this tonight, then pop into Bike Barn tomorrow, and see what they advise, and re tyre options. The Marathon ones mentioend are $99 each, other standard ones ar $29 or so each. Or I could go standard for a while and practice changing tubes!

As Techfreak mentioned I want to get the best fit. I thought a bike was a bike was a bike, pick a colour and take it home, but I'll make sure my height, inside leg etc are compatible

My concern is being a newbie and buying what I thought was ok, then learning the tech and finding out its not ok for my use.



You seem set on Bike Barn?  Not sure where you are based but these guys are another 'always on sale' place and seem to always have good deals.  http://www.evolutioncycles.co.nz/

 




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  Reply # 1211196 9-Jan-2015 15:12
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scuwp:
tdgeek:
heylinb4nz: Ive got a Merida Crossway 100 TFS, paid about $749 on special at Evolution Cycles, for commuting mainly on paved road, also goes fine on grass and light gravel\stone paths. being large narrow 700C wheels with a mild tread pattern it certainly can get upto speed, the gearing is also blanced nicely for hills and high end speed. I can pedal up steep hill with my 15kg toddler on the back.
 


Good to know. I didnt have a budget, but when I saw the Merida 10V from $899 down to $449, I guess $449 was my budget. Dang the sale ended suddenly.

The Crossway 300 is $999 on sale from $1700 ish, and I guess that's similar to your 100. The 300 is 27 speed, front suspension that can be locked which is handy, F+R disks, handy in wet but Im not bothered either way, dunno what the tyres look like, but I now know a little bit of the specs to go for, or not. Ill re read this tonight, then pop into Bike Barn tomorrow, and see what they advise, and re tyre options. The Marathon ones mentioend are $99 each, other standard ones ar $29 or so each. Or I could go standard for a while and practice changing tubes!

As Techfreak mentioned I want to get the best fit. I thought a bike was a bike was a bike, pick a colour and take it home, but I'll make sure my height, inside leg etc are compatible

My concern is being a newbie and buying what I thought was ok, then learning the tech and finding out its not ok for my use.



You seem set on Bike Barn?  Not sure where you are based but these guys are another 'always on sale' place and seem to always have good deals.  http://www.evolutioncycles.co.nz/

 


I'm in ChCh, Evo isnt here, only up North. BikeBarn I was told is the Briscoes of the bike world, and I notice the websites are remarkably similar in design. Maybe they are like Bond and Bond and Noel Leeming? Evo has the 10V at $449 sale proce that it was here the other day, and the Crossway 300 is $899, 100 cheaper than BikeBarn. I emailed Evo about how they ship (in a box or assembled) Probbaly safer to buy brick and mortar, ask the questions, etc.



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  Reply # 1211199 9-Jan-2015 15:16
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FITTING

I think I read that if you have the right frame, and the seat height set correctly, that you will be on tippy toes when stopped at the lights. To ensure the riding knee bend is efficient.
Is that ballpark?    

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  Reply # 1211217 9-Jan-2015 15:33
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As Techfreak mentioned I want to get the best fit. I thought a bike was a bike was a bike, pick a colour and take it home, but I'll make sure my height, inside leg etc are compatible


Remember also frames come in varying sizes. You don't want a bike that's too big that you cannot straddle it when stopped nor too small.  I'd recommend riding the bike or a series of bikes before you buy.  Don't buy the bike because the price is "right" and it the last one in stock.

The Sirrus I bought was in hindsight probably one size too big.  When I bought the Giant I also rode a Specialized as I already had one. It was the same spec more a less as the Giant (Carbon frame, 27 speed, price, etc) The Giant was a nicer bike to ride, I can't tell you why, it just was.

One thing I have noticed is my Specialized Sirrus hybrid steers quite differently to the Giant OCR C3.  I don't know if it's a hybrid V road bike thing or just a difference in the steering geometry between manufacturers. Once you're used to it there isn't a problem.

Try before you buy. Ride as many different bikes as you can.

Also remember fat tyres for soft surfaces thin tyres for firm surfaces.  Fat tyres mean a slower harder to pedal, softer ride, thin tyres mean a faster, easier to pedal and harder ride.  If you're only ever going slow the fat tyres don't matter.

Tyre pressure also makes a big difference to the ride and amount of pedal pressure you need to exert.




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  Reply # 1211220 9-Jan-2015 15:38
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tdgeek: FITTING

I think I read that if you have the right frame, and the seat height set correctly, that you will be on tippy toes when stopped at the lights. To ensure the riding knee bend is efficient.
Is that ballpark?    


From memory I think so.




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  Reply # 1211416 9-Jan-2015 21:34
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I have a  2007 Giant Yukon FX with disks/rear suspension etc, I can fit road and mtb tyres to the same wheel.
It was nice and shiny and I thought I could get the best of both worlds ,so I bought it.
I hope you can learn from my mistake.
It's way too heavy, 
I spend most of the time compressing and releasing the rear suspension ( which I can't lock out)
and the suspension isn't the advantage i thought it would be with the tarmac tyres.
As a mountain bike it's "ok", as a road bike it's miles to heavy.

I still have my fathers old Morrison Monarch which must be 1982 , when I was younger I put s sheepskin seat cover on it and rode it from Tauranga to Christchurch ( 9 days) and curiously, got just one puncture(was 1993 - less glass back then I suppose).
last time I rode it was about a year ago, nice long cranks, old tech , lightweight
 

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  Reply # 1211426 9-Jan-2015 22:05

turnin: I have a  2007 Giant Yukon FX with disks/rear suspension etc, I can fit road and mtb tyres to the same wheel.
It was nice and shiny and I thought I could get the best of both worlds ,so I bought it.
I hope you can learn from my mistake.
It's way too heavy, 
I spend most of the time compressing and releasing the rear suspension ( which I can't lock out)
and the suspension isn't the advantage i thought it would be with the tarmac tyres.
As a mountain bike it's "ok", as a road bike it's miles to heavy.

I still have my fathers old Morrison Monarch which must be 1982 , when I was younger I put s sheepskin seat cover on it and rode it from Tauranga to Christchurch ( 9 days) and curiously, got just one puncture(was 1993 - less glass back then I suppose).
last time I rode it was about a year ago, nice long cranks, old tech , lightweight
 


Morrison Monarch! They are quite a classic bike really.

Must have been a nice ride from Tauranga to Christchurch.

One puncture is insanely lucky.



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