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  Reply # 1212072 11-Jan-2015 19:56
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I was told maintenance is expensive vs cable disc?

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  Reply # 1212094 11-Jan-2015 20:29
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joker97: I was told maintenance is expensive vs cable disc?


Mineral fluid should last 4 years or more on a commuter bike, about $60 to replace

 

Pads are about $40 for a full set, and are easy to DIY at home. Should last 2 years or more on a daily commuter.

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  Reply # 1212135 11-Jan-2015 21:49
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scuwp: They still work in the wet :-)  And are (in my experience) much more progressive and powerful.  They do add weight (for commuting this would be negligible), and they look wayyyy coool!!!! 


I've never has problems with the normal brakes in the wet either.




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  Reply # 1212139 11-Jan-2015 21:58
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heylinb4nz:
joker97: I was told maintenance is expensive vs cable disc?


Mineral fluid should last 4 years or more on a commuter bike, about $60 to replace Pads are about $40 for a full set, and are easy to DIY at home. Should last 2 years or more on a daily commuter.


and cable - last forever unless it snaps or rusts out? hmm ... might have to stick with cable :D

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  Reply # 1212148 11-Jan-2015 22:22
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heylinb4nz:
joker97: I was told maintenance is expensive vs cable disc?


Mineral fluid should last 4 years or more on a commuter bike, about $60 to replace Pads are about $40 for a full set, and are easy to DIY at home. Should last 2 years or more on a daily commuter.


First bike's brake pads lasted 5 years.  Commuted for last 2 years solid, and still going strong.  Then again I don't slow down for much ;-)

 




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  Reply # 1212189 12-Jan-2015 07:51
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MileHighKiwi: I have a Trek Wahoo - a hard tail '29er'. 29ers are designed as hybrid on and off road bikes. I use it for commuting to work and riding easy-medium grade off road tracks. I found that the bike is not really suitable for anything too intense - for example Makara Peak in Wellington put my bike under lots of pressure, needed brakes replaced after a few rides up there and a few other minor issues. Since getting it repaired I've stuck to the river trails etc and it's perfect. Only cost around $600 too.

http://www.trekbikes.com/nz/en/bikes/2013/archive/trek/wahoo/#/nz/en/archive-model/details?url=nz/en/bikes/2013/archive/trek/wahoo



Can you define 29er?   Ive read about 700c, and 26" wheels, still getting my head round these terms, as relating to wheel size, tyre size and tyre volume




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  Reply # 1212190 12-Jan-2015 07:55
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Dratsab: A huge factor in discomfort is incorrect fit - this means seat height, seat fore/aft position, handlebar height and stem length. Whatever you end up buying, get it fitted to you properly. Although the last 10 or so years have tailed off sharply, I've got almost 36 years road cycling under my belt (starting with a Raleigh Arena in 1979) including racing with a few clubs and competing against others, so I have a bias towards road bikes. However, from what you've posted, I think the first answer from scuwp about a hardtail MTB is a good one.

Put road slicks on it for commuting/general riding and put knobbly's on it when you want to go off road. I have a Diamondback Vectra Sport MTB which is a hardtail bike I've been using for a bit of commuting lately. The suspension has a lockout on top of the right-hand fork so when I'm going uphill I stop the suspension from operating with a simple press of a button and none of my pedal power is lost through suspension movement. Going downhill, I press the button again to get the suspension operating and it takes a lot of the vibration out of my hands/arms making the ride a lot more comfortable.


Do cycle wheels cover a range of tyre types? As you said, slicks and knobblys, or are these the same size tyre just different designs?

I want to avoid teeny tyres (23?) due to a harder ride, and prefer slight knobblys, or more so, non slicks to lessen punctures. Having said that, I think I am leaning towards a non small tyre volume for comfort, and kevlar or the one with the plastic rim. Any ideas on the rolling resistance woudl be helpful, as in 23's are great, XX is poor, so YY is a good mix?



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  Reply # 1212196 12-Jan-2015 08:04
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jeffnz: The question you need to ask is how committed are you to keep cycling and what exactly is your goal. 

You can buy a new bike and go off with all the best intentions and it ends up in the garage gathering dust so the money is wasted.

Alternatively you buy a cheap new bike and fine you like it and quickly realise you need something better, once again money wasted.

Personally I would suggest you buy a MTB off tradme (second hand) as there is a lot of bike you can buy for $500-$800. A lot of bikes on sale there are from people upgrading or buying something on a new years whim to lose weight then found they weren't into it.

Don't buy  hybrid they are mainly for road or grass, road racing bikes are for speed and fitness but aren't cheap so the MTB is something that is good for road or trails. Disc brakes are a must as they don't suffer in the wet nor do they wear your rims down, they just make sense. Research models you see on trademe to ensure they are a good bike not one of the cheapo ones for under $200 you see in the warehouse that aren't recommended for off road. Full suspension is a waste if you are mainly on the road as it adds weight and you lose a percentage of your power into them and for a decent one you need to be paying a lot of money.

Don't worry about seat heights, punctures etc until you get on the road as unless you are intending to do a lot of riding it matters little. Use google there is a huge amount of information out there.

Best option is to borrow a bike from a friend for a couple of weeks to see if you like it but I wouldn't rush in to buy a bike from Bikebarn or likes until you know what you need instead of what you want. Most bike shops will advise you based on wanting to sell you one of their bikes, once again ask around or research.

edit: a good example of reasonable bike on Trademe


My off road goal is very minimal. Essentially I'd like a road bike, but I'd prefer non teeny tyres for comfort, and off road wise that would be limited to grass, some parks in my area have fine grade shingle foot/cycle ways, and in ChCh, some roads are quick and dirty temporary EQ repairs, some have yet to be repaired, and some are just plain bumpy due to the EQ's. So basicallty a road bike that can deal with smooth tarmac and as above. This is why I thought a hybrid would be a good mix if I can get the best combo of tyre volume/speed/comfort.  

As per your earlier points, yes, I dont want to get a bike, then become more knowledgable and see that I got the wrong one. I'll be sticking to non MTB surfaces, but if I do get into it after checking out the various road rides in ChCh, I'd get an MTB as well.

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  Reply # 1212336 12-Jan-2015 10:49
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tdgeek:
MileHighKiwi: I have a Trek Wahoo - a hard tail '29er'. 29ers are designed as hybrid on and off road bikes. I use it for commuting to work and riding easy-medium grade off road tracks. I found that the bike is not really suitable for anything too intense - for example Makara Peak in Wellington put my bike under lots of pressure, needed brakes replaced after a few rides up there and a few other minor issues. Since getting it repaired I've stuck to the river trails etc and it's perfect. Only cost around $600 too.

http://www.trekbikes.com/nz/en/bikes/2013/archive/trek/wahoo/#/nz/en/archive-model/details?url=nz/en/bikes/2013/archive/trek/wahoo



Can you define 29er?   Ive read about 700c, and 26" wheels, still getting my head round these terms, as relating to wheel size, tyre size and tyre volume




29er (29") as fitted are wider rimmed, usually found on downhill mountain bikes with wider knobbly tyres.

 


700c is also 29" (as fitted to Merida Crossway) narrower rim but can still accomodate knobbly, hybrid or slick tyre patterns on a more narrow tyre)

26" - standard mountain bike rim, hard work for commuting.


For commuting on tarmac the bigger narrower rim (700c) is the way to go, less resistance = easier ride and more speed.

Most of your Hybrids, inc Merida will come with a cross style tread pattern for tarmac and light gravel, they are not razor thin like full on road bikes either (approx 1.5" wide).

My Crossway ive used on tarmac, light gravel paths, grass, wet and dry and had no issue with grip.

 

On the disc brakes, the additional stopping power is appreciated when you realise how quick the 29"\700C wheel size combined with narrower tyre can get you. 50kmh+ on flat smooth surfaces in town.

 

 

 

 

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  Reply # 1212393 12-Jan-2015 11:44
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+1 for disc brakes, much better in the wet.

Personally I would go for something more robust than a 'road' bike.  As a commuter, you will spend most of you time riding near the lane edge.  This is where crap accumulates - the sort of crap that will puncture 'road' bike tyres and cause other problems.  Ditto the cycle lane - how often do you see a 'road' bike ridden in the cycle lane?

A 'road' bike is great on race day.  For a daily commute, a solid hybrid is much more practical.  They are slower in optimal conditions, but how often to you encounter those?  Lots of things slow 'road' bikes down - road works, loose seal, debris, raised pedestrians crossings.

My daily rider (3 days/week) is a cheap hard-tail MTB with firmly inflated road tyres.  I have never had a puncture.  I have a second set of rims I bought second hand with MTB tyres for the weekend.

I am frequently overtaken by the spandex set when road conditions are great.   I frequently pass them when road conditions are not great.





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  Reply # 1212445 12-Jan-2015 12:32
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As a cyclist in Chch, I'd suggest that there ARE advantages to using a MTB with road tyres as a commuting bike, as the roads are still pretty rough in places.  However, having done that for a number of years I've recently switched to a Specialised Secteur road bike, for the simple reason that it has mounting points for a carrier and panniers, which is a LOT more convenient for commuting.  Previously I had a small seat post mounted carrier on the MTB, and that was good for small loads, but as soon as you want to carry a change of clothes, a laptop, and misc other items a set of panniers is definitely the way to go.  Carrying stuff on your back is uncomfortable and sweaty, whereas with panniers you forget the load until you hit the hills.

The other advantage of the Secteur over the MTB is that it has slightly bigger wheels, which roll better, and give an easier ride.  I've got slicks on my MTB and normally aim for ~30km/hr cruising speed, but can achieve this easier on the Secteur.

Finally, there's posture.  MTBs tend to be shorter and more upright, and while I've done everything I can to adjust my MTB to the same fit as my road bike and Secteur I simply can't ride it as long without cramping up.  While that does take a few hours to occur (130+ km in one case) it simply doesn't happen on my other bikes.

To add to comments from others - choice of tyres will determine puncture resistance.  Some tyres are prone to cut and puncture, whereas others are harder and may include kevlar belts, which make quite a difference.  On the down side, heavier tyres tend to be harder to push, and may not ride quite as smoothly.

To summarise - pluses for an MTB are manoeuvrability, robustness, and suitability for rough roads and evasive manoeuvres.  Pluses for a road bike are the ride, and potential to add a carrier and panniers if you can find a bike like the Secteur that will take them.




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  Reply # 1212561 12-Jan-2015 14:14
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Instead of spending time in the likes of B.Barn or on technology sites... get into a real bike store, ask the opinion of long time cyclists and keep your mind open.
I've ridden and raced (not anymore though) for over 20 years and can tell you the only thing you need to do is ride the bike - then you'll know!
The differences between different brands / styles are really noticeable.
I've built rides up from specs / measurements, but the ride is never spot on until things like stem length, seat rail adjustment, seat height, bar angle are adjusted 'just so'.
Don't even get me started on suspension and brake adjustments... but for commuting, this isn't really needed.

Advice:
Buy a bike with...
Replaceable chainrings.
Great wheels.
Top notch comfort... as it doesn't matter how fit you are, if you can't put the power down because you're uncomfortable, you simply CAN'T put the power down!
Pay attention to the points of contact...
1: Seat (comfortable for the length of time you're looking to ride).
2: Handlebars - good grips, correct width of the bars, good angle of the bars (plus brake levers) and the right length and rise of the stem.
3: Pedals (clipless / toe straps or flats).




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  Reply # 1212573 12-Jan-2015 14:32
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Dunnersfella: Instead of spending time in the likes of B.Barn or on technology sites... get into a real bike store, ask the opinion of long time cyclists and keep your mind open.
I've ridden and raced (not anymore though) for over 20 years and can tell you the only thing you need to do is ride the bike - then you'll know!
The differences between different brands / styles are really noticeable.
I've built rides up from specs / measurements, but the ride is never spot on until things like stem length, seat rail adjustment, seat height, bar angle are adjusted 'just so'.
Don't even get me started on suspension and brake adjustments... but for commuting, this isn't really needed.

Advice:
Buy a bike with...
Replaceable chainrings.
Great wheels.
Top notch comfort... as it doesn't matter how fit you are, if you can't put the power down because you're uncomfortable, you simply CAN'T put the power down!
Pay attention to the points of contact...
1: Seat (comfortable for the length of time you're looking to ride).
2: Handlebars - good grips, correct width of the bars, good angle of the bars (plus brake levers) and the right length and rise of the stem.
3: Pedals (clipless / toe straps or flats).



I am going in tomorrow morming, and I've been given the guys name who is the whizz bang (my words) on rider fitment. And I asked if I can ride some to get a feel, and no worries. As for tech sites, yep, I hear you, but I started with my bike knowledge base of zero, so I felt GZ was a good way to get multi opinions, to basically give me a knowledge kickstart, and to know what to ask for or to do at the store.

What is a good store? It depends on who serves you. A guy at work is a long time biker, he said BB are pretty good, and he knows his stuff. Bicycle Busness website doesnt seem that great, my perception. Torpedo 7 seems to be in the $2000 to $6000 range. Evo isnt here, they seem like BB. I'm in ChCh, unsure of anywhere else of note?

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  Reply # 1212579 12-Jan-2015 14:41
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Torpedo 7, nope.
Bicycle Business are on the pricier side of things, but a good 'core' store that have supported the scene for a long time.
As have Chain Reaction on Riccarton Road.
Each store has their top 'guy' who knows the bikes inside out, can sell and fix your rig if need be. Most importantly, they care about getting you the right bike.
Some stores are newer to Chch (Bike Bard/Surgery etc), but the stores that are staffed by riders who know their stuff are the ones that succeed!




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  Reply # 1212585 12-Jan-2015 14:51
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Dunnersfella: Torpedo 7, nope.
Bicycle Business are on the pricier side of things, but a good 'core' store that have supported the scene for a long time.
As have Chain Reaction on Riccarton Road.
Each store has their top 'guy' who knows the bikes inside out, can sell and fix your rig if need be. Most importantly, they care about getting you the right bike.
Some stores are newer to Chch (Bike Bard/Surgery etc), but the stores that are staffed by riders who know their stuff are the ones that succeed!



Passionate, fully agree. I will update in the morning, as I hope to recieve that assurance. I gather Merida is an ok brand?


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