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  Reply # 1216499 17-Jan-2015 13:17
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Queiing Theory is fascinating to study. What's relevant in the traffic world is also very relevant to the networking world where it forms the basic of QoS modelling.

You can build QoS models to improve average throughput and give an end user a better QoE. If people did obey speed restrictions then in a real world delays and stop start traffic could be minimised, but because people don't follow these and are unpredictable, the real world can never deliver the real benefits.

Roll on driverless cars!



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  Reply # 1216500 17-Jan-2015 13:19
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Geektastic:
Dratsab: I was about to post the same as k1wi. I don't see anything in the NZTA which helps explain why they're calling it a smart motorway though.


Because a branding consultant was paid many thousands to come up with a new phrase? ;-)


Smart phones, smart TVs. Maybe one day there'll be such thing as a smart driver? tongue-out




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


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  Reply # 1216516 17-Jan-2015 13:59
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sbiddle: Electronic signs are not, and never have been guides. They are legally enforced speed limits.


not entirely correct, the ones on the harbour bridge are not, as i asked this question through phoebe to the NZTA
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10828327


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  Reply # 1216592 17-Jan-2015 16:33
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Jase2985:
sbiddle: Electronic signs are not, and never have been guides. They are legally enforced speed limits.


not entirely correct, the ones on the harbour bridge are not, as i asked this question through phoebe to the NZTA
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10828327



Correct. Auckland Harbour bridge signs are simply a posted speed inside the lane indicator if memory serves me correct. This is not a legal speed limit sign.

For a speed sign to be legally enforceable it has to have a red border around it, as per the road code. The Wellington motorway signs all have a red border around them. Auckland Harbour bridge does not.


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  Reply # 1217901 19-Jan-2015 21:40
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KiwiNZ:
blakamin: Armco isn't going to stop a truck and it's dangerous (unless fully enclosed) for motorcyclists. Concrete barriers along the motorway are higher than Armco (Armco only really works with short posts). Concrete barriers can be moved in the event of a serious civil emergency with a crane and replaced easily (you'd have to cut all the posts to do that to Armco). Armco will bend and end up in the oncoming lane, concrete stays where it is 98% of the time (did anyone see that viper that crossed SH1 Armco between Plimmerton and Pukerua Bay years ago? What a mess. I've seen many vehicles hit the concrete but can't recall one going through).


A big chunk of the urban motorway is already enclosed Armco so I am not sure why they are using concrete. I am pleased they are not going to use that biker lethal wire barriers.


IIRCC that "enclosed armco" was a U shaped trough that was filled with coarse gravel from concrete mixer trucks before the top was attached. It's probably as heavy as a concrete barrier would be.

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