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  Reply # 1423083 8-Nov-2015 10:51
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tardtasticx: As the title suggests, which way do you prefer to hill start and why?
see: http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Started-on-a-Hill-when-Driving-a-Manual-Transmission-Car

 

     

  1. Heel-toe
  2. Shuffle
  3. Handbrake

 


My reason for asking, I'm currently learning how to drive a manual car after using an auto since I got my learners. I've been on my full for 3-4 years now so it's more a case of learning a new way of doing something rather than learning to drive from scratch. 

I've had a professional driving lesson last week and was taught a few ways but keep getting the feeling that I should be using the handbrake method. Mainly because I'm terrified of stalling while shuffling between peddles and rolling back into another car. I haven't left my neighbourhood yet because of this, as to get out I need to go up a very very steep hill (more often than not it's from a complete stop due to morning traffic). See here and here, the only two ways out.

Any tips would deffo be much appreciated. 


NOT 1.
Combination of 2 + 3. It's never one vs the other.
As explained by someone.

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  Reply # 1423092 8-Nov-2015 11:35
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My driving instructor taught me

Handbrake on

Engage 1st

Blend clutch to biting point

Slowly release handbrake and increase clutch accelerator to move off.

UK military driving instructors put matchboxes behind the tyre - if you crush the matchbox, you fail...!





 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1423121 8-Nov-2015 12:53
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Geektastic: Manual? They still make those?

Yes they do but often the need for manual skills is due to what is available on the second hand car market. While those with lots of money can probably easily find a good automatic or afford the high costs when the old ones go wrong, manual can still make a lot of sense. I still believe a lot of automatics have poorer economy than the manual (certainly was the case when I bought a 2012 model) but I agree autos can be better.

I reckon handbrake is best when hills get steep but the shuffle ok for slight hills. Definitely worth learning to use handbrake.


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  Reply # 1423125 8-Nov-2015 13:19
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Best start with what the manual license test requires in the country you want to get the license in.

https://www.practice.co.nz/pass-planner/beginner/hill-driving/manual-hill-driving.aspx

http://www.2pass.co.uk/hill.htm

Driving test examiners aren't known for a curiosity in interesting and novel techniques, especially when poorly executed.


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  Reply # 1423126 8-Nov-2015 13:38
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I learned to drive in an 80s Ford and learned the handbrake method. That's the same method that I've always used (I didn't even know that there were other ways!).

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  Reply # 1423127 8-Nov-2015 13:44
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In a familiar vehicle, shuffle, unless it's really steep, then handbrake. Otherwise, handbrake.




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  Reply # 1423134 8-Nov-2015 14:01
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Thanks everyone for the helpful replies! Seems like the best way forward to learn would be with the handbrake then maybe try another technique once I get used to the car and driving a manual in general. And obviously, practice practice practice haha. I do feel way more at ease now knowing I'm not getting into a bad habit by learning the handbrake method. 

MikeB4:
tardtasticx:

 


Can I ask why you want to use a manual car?

Modern automatic transmissions are far better and efficient than manuals, unless you are going to do serious off roading or truck driving.


It's a swap with one of my parents old cars, after they retired an older one and got a new replacement. It's a few years newer than my old one and a few less Ks. My old one was more powerful which dad would enjoy so it's a great swap for both of us. 

Thanks a bunch again everyone, even got a very helpful PM from someone. I should think about making a dash cam compilation of my mishaps while practicing :P




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  Reply # 1423141 8-Nov-2015 14:14
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dwl: I still believe a lot of automatics have poorer economy than the manual (certainly was the case when I bought a 2012 model) but I agree autos can be better.


Autos have come a long way. The advent of the lock-up torque converter made a big improvement to their fuel economy, as did more than 3 gear ratios.




"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."
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  Reply # 1423143 8-Nov-2015 14:15
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Heel-toe looks outright dangerous, I had never heard of this method before.
Handbrake is the standard method driving instructors in Europe use and it's what I use most.
On a less steep hill I use the shuffle method (or if you are only stopping very briefly)

I'm driving a manual as well (2013 car imported from UK).
Main reason most European cars are manuals is because manuals are far cheaper than automatics. Buying an automatic can cost between £2k and ~£5k on top of the regular price.




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  Reply # 1423146 8-Nov-2015 14:37
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tardtasticx: It's a swap with one of my parents old cars, after they retired an older one and got a new replacement. It's a few years newer than my old one and a few less Ks.


Does your driving licence permit you to drive manual?

NZTA: Obtaining a learner licence, If you sit the restricted test in an automatic vehicle, a condition will be imposed on your licence limiting you to driving only automatic vehicles. 


https://www.nzta.govt.nz/assets/resources/factsheets/45/docs/45-learning-to-drive.pdf




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  Reply # 1423149 8-Nov-2015 14:47
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floydbloke: www.practice.co.nz suggests the handbrake method.

I think the chances of rolling back would be greater in methods 1 & 2.  

The young fella is going for his restricted in a couple of weeks and he has certainly been learning the handbrake method.
The restricted test guide doesn't appear to have anything explicit on hill-starts - I'm a bit little surprised at that.




Just confirming you're correct - no hill start in restricted test (did mine 2 months ago).

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  Reply # 1423150 8-Nov-2015 14:49
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roobarb:
tardtasticx: It's a swap with one of my parents old cars, after they retired an older one and got a new replacement. It's a few years newer than my old one and a few less Ks.


Does your driving licence permit you to drive manual?

NZTA: Obtaining a learner licence, If you sit the restricted test in an automatic vehicle, a condition will be imposed on your licence limiting you to driving only automatic vehicles. 


https://www.nzta.govt.nz/assets/resources/factsheets/45/docs/45-learning-to-drive.pdf





This only applies when you're on your restricted, I'm on mine and I sat it in an automatic, but once I get my full license I'm free to drive a manual even though I never have and don't know how.

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  Reply # 1423153 8-Nov-2015 14:56
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The 4 cars I've had since the late 90's have all been manual. I've now got a new Focus that's an auto, and don't really have a choice in the matter because that's pretty much all Ford bring in.

An auto of today is nothing like the ones I drove in the 90's, and while I still say I prefer manuals, I wouldn't prefer to own one with the driving I do which involves stop start traffic on the motorway each day. It's so much more enjoyable in an auto.

As for the original question, I use both the handbrake and riding the clutch, it really depends on the situation.


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  Reply # 1423277 8-Nov-2015 19:43
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Can I ask why you want to use a manual car?

Modern automatic transmissions are far better and efficient than manuals, unless you are going to do serious off roading or truck driving.


Hahahaha.  You almost made be fall off my chair.  You don't really believe that do you?

Automatic transmissions are so good they mostly use them for racing.  No wait.  They use manual transmissions.  They use manual transmissions because they are not as good.  No wait.  They use manual transmissions because they want to win the race and they are better in just about every regard.

Sure, if you are a crap driver or can't be bothered getting any proper skills you might be better off with an automatic.  It's easy right?  You don't even have to think or plan your gear changes.  If you have even a moderate skill level you can get both better performance and better fuel economy than an automatic transmission.




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  Reply # 1423279 8-Nov-2015 19:49
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roobarb:
tardtasticx: It's a swap with one of my parents old cars, after they retired an older one and got a new replacement. It's a few years newer than my old one and a few less Ks.


Does your driving licence permit you to drive manual?

NZTA: Obtaining a learner licence, If you sit the restricted test in an automatic vehicle, a condition will be imposed on your licence limiting you to driving only automatic vehicles. 


https://www.nzta.govt.nz/assets/resources/factsheets/45/docs/45-learning-to-drive.pdf





Previously it did, as I sat my restricted in an Auto. But I've had my full for some years now. 

NZTA (same doc as above): Once you hold a full licence, you can drive either automatic or manual vehicles, regardless of the type of vehicle you sat your test in.




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