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  Reply # 1439451 2-Dec-2015 18:31
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I may not have explained clearly. 

Essentially I am suggesting that anyone performing an overtaking maneuver at a passing lane in a 100kmn area should be allowed to do 120km/hr for the purposes of overtaking.

Everyone else still has to do 100.  So if a person in the left lane at a passing lane just sits on 120 - they get ticketed for speeding.

Easy to distinguish an overtaking car because it has its indicator on.
 

gzt: They would just speed up to 120. Horsefloats, boat trailers, you name it.




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  Reply # 1439547 2-Dec-2015 21:07
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MikeAqua: What if we had a higher speed limit (e.g 120km/hr) in the right hand lane at passing lanes?

That would nullify the effect of people who speed up at passing lanes.


Increases the danger for oncoming vehicles.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1439563 2-Dec-2015 21:36
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I think one of the irritating aspects of the speed limit (and the Police attitude) is that you are expected to use your judgement and slow down in adverse conditions. But for some reason your judgement isn't appropriate beyond the magic figure of 100kph.


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  Reply # 1439604 2-Dec-2015 22:13
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frankv: I think one of the irritating aspects of the speed limit (and the Police attitude) is that you are expected to use your judgement and slow down in adverse conditions. But for some reason your judgement isn't appropriate beyond the magic figure of 100kph.



I think it is reasonable to set speeds limit for typical conditions and expect people to lower their speeds in worse than typical conditions. 

If we assume people are unable to adjust their speed in poor weather / fog then speed limits would be much lower.

As for allowing people to use their judgement for going over 100kph -- that doesn't work for me. Some people judge themselves as safe to drive at 150kph.  You need to have some certainty in this.  100kph is not a magic figure, there is a ton of crash data and science out there.  

I think a 10kph tolerance is reasonable, as the nature of our roads, and speedo calibration errors could quite easily cause a 10kph variance.  

A 5kph tolerance means that your eyes are on the speedo instead of the road. 




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  Reply # 1439619 2-Dec-2015 22:47
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jeffnz:

So what is it about people that are wanting to contest everything when in reality they knew they were breaking the law. Is it just a huge sense of indignation that someone dares to question tier driving habits or just an inflated sense of entitlement.



In my case, I don't think it's either.

I accept that there needs to be a speed limit. I accept it needs to be enforced, and I even accept that given the condition of most of our roads 100km might be correct (although 110 or even 120 might be better on modern motorways in modern cars).

I agree that people who speed excessively are a menace, and that they should be caught and pinged. I also think very slow drivers, particularly on motorways and especially sitting on the inside lane below 80 in good conditions, are a significant safety hazard who should should be pulled over and fined.

I don't, however, agree with a 4km tolerance. It's too close to the maximum and, as others have pointed out, well within the boundaries of calibration errors on cars. I want people to drive sensibly at a sensible speed, but looking at the road not their speedo - in case a moment's inattention to on a downwards slope etc attracts a fine.

Someone doing 105 in a 100 zone isn't a menace and, at the most, should get a verbal ticking off. They should concentrate on those who exceed the limit by a meaningful amount.

From a safety perspective, I personally think there would be much better dividends staking out intersections and going after cars and cyclists that run red lights, and those who fail to indicate at roundabouts, than going after some poor sod who inadvertently briefly drifts up to 105 on a clear motorway because they were watching the road and not their speedo.

My objective isn't that it's necessarily a revenue grab or that I like to speed. I think that as a safety initiative it's a bit of a stunt that is poorly targeted, fairly capricious, focuses on people who by and large aren't the biggest safety risk, and is ineffective.

gzt

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  Reply # 1439622 2-Dec-2015 22:59
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Im guessing in practice without lowering the tolerance you get stretches of road where a high proportion of the traffic is doing following 110-115, with the occasional vehicle overtaking these at 125-130. It used to be a common thing on holiday weekends and holiday periods.

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  Reply # 1439780 3-Dec-2015 11:05
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Really - at a set of passing lanes?




Rappelle:
MikeAqua: What if we had a higher speed limit (e.g 120km/hr) in the right hand lane at passing lanes?

That would nullify the effect of people who speed up at passing lanes.


Increases the danger for oncoming vehicles.




Mike

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  Reply # 1439785 3-Dec-2015 11:10
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MikeAqua: Really - at a set of passing lanes?




Rappelle:
MikeAqua: What if we had a higher speed limit (e.g 120km/hr) in the right hand lane at passing lanes?

That would nullify the effect of people who speed up at passing lanes.


Increases the danger for oncoming vehicles.


Some passing lanes are shared ( very bad design imho) others do not have a separation. If they allow 120km/h people will do 130km/h which is an issue in NZ. Burst speeds higher that 100km/h have some merit around time exposed to danger but would be a nightmare to police.




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


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  Reply # 1439788 3-Dec-2015 11:15
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I'll just leave this here...
https://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-limits/speed-limits/

Yes, the maximum open road speed limit is 100km/h, and yes 4m/h tolerance is too small. However, it also very clears states:

 

Slow drivers

 

If you are travelling slower than the speed limit and there are vehicles following you, you must:

 

  • keep as close to the left side of the road as possible
  • pull over as soon as it is safe to let following vehicles pass.
Don’t speed up on straight stretches of road to prevent following vehicles from passing you.

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  Reply # 1439792 3-Dec-2015 11:28
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I've never seen a shared passing lane - sounds highly dangerous.

Allowing people to put their foot down when overtaking at passing lanes would not only reduce time spent overtaking, it would allow more vehicles past per passing lane, reducing congestion.

I find it frustrating when I'm in line behind a slow vehicle and the first vehicle behind it spends the entire passing lane overtaking at 104.

Personally I don't look at the speedometer when overtaking.  One the road is clear I change down and go. 

MikeB4:
Some passing lanes are shared ( very bad design imho) others do not have a separation. If they allow 120km/h people will do 130km/h which is an issue in NZ. Burst speeds higher that 100km/h have some merit around time exposed to danger but would be a nightmare to police.




Mike

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  Reply # 1439815 3-Dec-2015 11:41
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WyleECoyoteNZ: I'll just leave this here...
https://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-limits/speed-limits/

Yes, the maximum open road speed limit is 100km/h, and yes 4m/h tolerance is too small. However, it also very clears states:
Slow drivers If you are travelling slower than the speed limit and there are vehicles following you, you must:

 

  • keep as close to the left side of the road as possible
  • pull over as soon as it is safe to let following vehicles pass.
Don’t speed up on straight stretches of road to prevent following vehicles from passing you.


How it feels like drivers read that excerpt:


Slow drivers If you are travelling slower than the speed limit and there are vehicles following you, you must:

 

  • Drive right in the middle of the lane.
  • Move into the passing lane when one is available
  • Increase your speed to speed limit + 10km/h as soon as as passing lane is available
  • Once passing lane is finished, return to your original speed - 3km/h

Hmm, what to write...
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  Reply # 1439828 3-Dec-2015 11:54
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MikeB4:
MikeAqua: Really - at a set of passing lanes?




Rappelle:
MikeAqua: What if we had a higher speed limit (e.g 120km/hr) in the right hand lane at passing lanes?

That would nullify the effect of people who speed up at passing lanes.


Increases the danger for oncoming vehicles.


Some passing lanes are shared ( very bad design imho) others do not have a separation. If they allow 120km/h people will do 130km/h which is an issue in NZ. Burst speeds higher that 100km/h have some merit around time exposed to danger but would be a nightmare to police.


I have never seen such a thing. You can however have a passing lane that does not have a yellow no passing line on the oncoming lane. Passing a vehicle (from the single lane side) is legal but you really have to make sure there is a max of one car on the dual lane side. (who of course must legally be in the left lane)




Matthew


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  Reply # 1439830 3-Dec-2015 11:55
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MikeAqua: I've never seen a shared passing lane - sounds highly dangerous.

Allowing people to put their foot down when overtaking at passing lanes would not only reduce time spent overtaking, it would allow more vehicles past per passing lane, reducing congestion.

I find it frustrating when I'm in line behind a slow vehicle and the first vehicle behind it spends the entire passing lane overtaking at 104.

Personally I don't look at the speedometer when overtaking.  One the road is clear I change down and go. 

MikeB4:
Some passing lanes are shared ( very bad design imho) others do not have a separation. If they allow 120km/h people will do 130km/h which is an issue in NZ. Burst speeds higher that 100km/h have some merit around time exposed to danger but would be a nightmare to police.


Here is a shared passing lane we snapped unintentionally on our last trip away. There is a few of these around the central North Island.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 It's our only home, lets clean it up then...

 

Take My Advice, Pull Down Your Pants And Slide On The Ice!

 

 


Hmm, what to write...
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  Reply # 1439834 3-Dec-2015 11:56
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MikeB4:
MikeAqua: I've never seen a shared passing lane - sounds highly dangerous.

Allowing people to put their foot down when overtaking at passing lanes would not only reduce time spent overtaking, it would allow more vehicles past per passing lane, reducing congestion.

I find it frustrating when I'm in line behind a slow vehicle and the first vehicle behind it spends the entire passing lane overtaking at 104.

Personally I don't look at the speedometer when overtaking.  One the road is clear I change down and go. 

MikeB4:
Some passing lanes are shared ( very bad design imho) others do not have a separation. If they allow 120km/h people will do 130km/h which is an issue in NZ. Burst speeds higher that 100km/h have some merit around time exposed to danger but would be a nightmare to police.


Here is a shared passing lane we snapped unintentionally on our last trip away. There is a few of these around the central North Island.

That is not a shared passing lane...see my other post




Matthew


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  Reply # 1439836 3-Dec-2015 11:58
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WyleECoyoteNZ: I'll just leave this here...
https://www.nzta.govt.nz/resources/roadcode/about-limits/speed-limits/

Yes, the maximum open road speed limit is 100km/h, and yes 4m/h tolerance is too small. However, it also very clears states:
Slow drivers If you are travelling slower than the speed limit and there are vehicles following you, you must:

 

  • keep as close to the left side of the road as possible
  • pull over as soon as it is safe to let following vehicles pass.
Don’t speed up on straight stretches of road to prevent following vehicles from passing you.


Totally agree - if they are going to campaign and ping on one end of the scale, they should put equal effort into doing the same at the other end of the scale - especially since (IMO) that slower end of the scale will often mean impatient drivers (and patient ones) can end up taking stupid risks to get past.

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