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  Reply # 1472303 15-Jan-2016 23:25
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Geektastic: I'd report the car as stolen myself (after I'd left the ex employee a message on his phone giving him 24 hrs to pay the balance or return the vehicle).


I would talk to the employment lawyer before doing that in case it is harassment or something.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 1472335 16-Jan-2016 00:17
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I think that would be bad. This is a civil loan scenario. The lender may have equity in the car but that does not make it theft.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1472354 16-Jan-2016 05:42

I think the following:

The insurance on the car should have stated that other people will be driving the car, namely that "employee".
That way when things turn to custard like in this case you are at least covered from both sides.
Especially since it looks to be a verbal agreement both parties and nothing written? There is always a case of he said she said.

EDIT: Sorry forgot to include I would definitely explain the situation to the insurance company and if they don't come to the party then ask your lawyer for advise.

Hmm, what to write...
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  Reply # 1472439 16-Jan-2016 10:35
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Yep Report it as stolen. It is not a civil matter it is a criminal matter.
Why?
1 You are the registered owner (this helps show it is yours)
2 You have a receipt from the previous owner... this is PROOF you own the car.
3 Your employee has no evidence to the contrary


Other things that help your case
As soon as your employee crashed the car he did a runner. This indicates to any Police Officer or Judge that he realises he owes you.
Basically he has stolen a car belonging to his employer (if he says he was going to give it back then it is conversion, but either way he is screwed)




Matthew


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  Reply # 1472497 16-Jan-2016 11:11
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mdooher: Yep Report it as stolen. It is not a civil matter it is a criminal matter.
Why?
1 You are the registered owner (this helps show it is yours)
2 You have a receipt from the previous owner... this is PROOF you own the car.
3 Your employee has no evidence to the contrary


Other things that help your case
As soon as your employee crashed the car he did a runner. This indicates to any Police Officer or Judge that he realises he owes you.
Basically he has stolen a car belonging to his employer (if he says he was going to give it back then it is conversion, but either way he is screwed)


there are a lot of assumptions here. The reason Lawyers take years to qualify is the law is more complex than DNA and is a minefield. A talk with
the lawyer is the best option here and follow their advice when given.




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


Hmm, what to write...
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  Reply # 1472508 16-Jan-2016 11:36
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MikeB4:
mdooher: Yep Report it as stolen. It is not a civil matter it is a criminal matter.
Why?
1 You are the registered owner (this helps show it is yours)
2 You have a receipt from the previous owner... this is PROOF you own the car.
3 Your employee has no evidence to the contrary


Other things that help your case
As soon as your employee crashed the car he did a runner. This indicates to any Police Officer or Judge that he realises he owes you.
Basically he has stolen a car belonging to his employer (if he says he was going to give it back then it is conversion, but either way he is screwed)


there are a lot of assumptions here. The reason Lawyers take years to qualify is the law is more complex than DNA and is a minefield. A talk with
the lawyer is the best option here and follow their advice when given.


let me put it this way... when I was the person behind the front counter taking the complaints I would have most certainly categorised  this as theft and opened a file.

Without doubt this would result in a visit and a please explain... what happens next will depend on what is said by the employee




Matthew


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