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Topic # 196153 20-May-2016 22:17
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You all probably know this anyway but I was a bit shocked to watch a piece on Fair Go about cars in Australia which have been classified as Statutory Write Offs as a result of things like floods etc which are then put on boats, given a quick valet and flogged to unsuspecting Ordinary Kiwis.

 

a) Why is that legal here?

 

b) Why don't we just ban it?

 

c) See above.






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  Reply # 1556596 20-May-2016 22:18
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From the Dept of Transport Qld website

 

 

 

Statutory write-off

 

A statutory write-off is too badly damaged to be repaired to a standard that is safe for road use. The vehicle identification number (VIN) is recorded as a statutory write-off, and the vehicle is not allowed to be registered. These vehicles are only suitable for use as parts or scrap metal.






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  Reply # 1556599 20-May-2016 22:32
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Qld is a bit different to everywhere else.. they're weird.. :p

 

Basically it was a way to keep the Aussie car industry working. That's gone now so...

 

Insurance companies like writing stuff off too, especially after floods. There's not enough people to fix them and customers aren't going to wait a year for a car repair after a major flood. They really had no choice.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1556611 20-May-2016 23:24
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Still not sure offloading them on unsuspected members of the NZ public is a Good Thing though! There is enough junk on NZ roads as it is - no need to add more.

 

Certainly it should not be legal to do so without clearly drawing the customer's attention to the history of the vehicle. The FG article found that a number of Honest John motor traders were neglecting to bother on a well known online auction site...!






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  Reply # 1556620 21-May-2016 00:22
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If the cars pass an AA check or some other equivalent mechanical inspection and have a current WoF/license what exactly is the problem?


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  Reply # 1556639 21-May-2016 03:22
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It might fall apart prematurely? Very prematurely? Just guessing though

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  Reply # 1556651 21-May-2016 06:12
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After a flood a vehicle maybe mechanically and cosmetically ok but the controllers and electrics are doomed and will start to fail.
There should be something similar to a LIM and this information mandatory and part of the window sheet.




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  Reply # 1556657 21-May-2016 06:54
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As soon as any electrics go underwater its a multi-$1000's repair, also silt will get into places that it shouldnt be in, holding moisture promoting rust from the inside etc.

 

just seeing how bad the rust from a bit of wet scuba gear in a boot is I hate to think what something that has had considerably more water in it will do.





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  Reply # 1556658 21-May-2016 07:08
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richms:

As soon as any electrics go underwater its a multi-$1000's repair, also silt will get into places that it shouldnt be in, holding moisture promoting rust from the inside etc.


just seeing how bad the rust from a bit of wet scuba gear in a boot is I hate to think what something that has had considerably more water in it will do.



The same with our boat and tow vehicles, what we went through to protect from water even fresh water was very time consuming but vital.




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  Reply # 1556661 21-May-2016 07:27
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MikeB4:
The same with our boat and tow vehicles, what we went through to protect from water even fresh water was very time consuming but vital.

 

Yeah the back of my falcon right above the towbar was totally rusted out when I bought it. Got some wofs ok till some little authoritative dictator wannabe decided that it was close enough to nothing structural to be a problem. Previous owner had it for a boat, guess the back of it got hit by a wake or something as it was backing in to cause it. Some more rust was found when the bumper was off to fix it after a genius drove into it, but nothing structural so no worries. It only has to last till I decide what I want to replace it with ;)





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  Reply # 1556726 21-May-2016 11:02
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UHD:

 

If the cars pass an AA check or some other equivalent mechanical inspection and have a current WoF/license what exactly is the problem?

 

 

The problem is that you the buyer should be able to make an informed choice as to whether you are prepared to take the risk, whatever it is.

 

If the information is not disclosed, you can't do that.






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  Reply # 1556789 21-May-2016 13:04
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UHD:

 

If the cars pass an AA check or some other equivalent mechanical inspection and have a current WoF/license what exactly is the problem?

 

 do you honestly think such a check can deem a car safe? Flood damage tends to be pretty comprehensive and damages many of the exotic components that a modern car is chocka-block with with.


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  Reply # 1556800 21-May-2016 13:31
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The Aussies have written-off vehicle registers, but it looks like state by state, and there's a fee to look-up the registers by VIN search.
Write-offs have to be notified whether they're deemed "repairable" or "not repairable".  If "repairable" then they can be re-registered, but from what I've read the Aussie insurance companies are reluctant to offer more than (statutory) third party insurance to a repaired car which is on the record as having been written off - even if deemed repairable.

 

It would be nice to think that those "repairable" cars are the only ones that come to NZ.  Hail damage etc, expensive repairs/replacement to panels, glass etc, but no problem if that's been repaired.  A friend of mine bought one - presumed to be that - hail damage, bought by a panelbeater/painter, repaired, imported by him as a private import, then reg in NZ - used by the owner for a year or two. The seller disclosed that it had been written off and repaired, and the price reflected that (very cheap).  It seems to be fine - in very good condition, but there's no practical way to know long-term except to wait.  I wouldn't buy one.

 

Surely it can't be that hard to impose a condition on all Aussie imports to NZ, that the importer who knows which state it was registered in, should pay the $5 or whatever fee and supply the Aussie vehicle report, and the relevant information gets added to the NZ registration record.


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  Reply # 1557575 22-May-2016 21:00
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I have imported a couple of these Statutory Writeoffs, and people need to keep a few things in perspective here.

 

The vehicle is flagged as being imported as damaged when it arrives in NZ, no matter what the damage is, from hail damage to impact damage

 

 

 

In regards to Statutory write offs, the only law is you cant fix them in Australia as they are insurance write off

 

This doesn't mean they cannot get fixed, and everyone of these vehicle that comes to the country gets checked by vehicle engineers, more heavily checked than any japan import.

 

Its not as simple as fix and put on the road there is steps that needs to taken before vehicle is aloud to be put on the road

 

 

 

Last car I did, I could not see why it was written-off, as the damage was so small and involved bolt-on parts only

 

When these vehicles are repaired, they have to be checked and signed-off by a Certified Light Vehicle Repair Specialist, and if they deem that the repairs are not to either manufacturers or I-Car standards, then the vehicle does not get Certified as being repaired correctly.

 

It then has to be re-repaired and checked again.

 

After this, it goes through the Compliance process, but it cannot complete the compliance process until the repairs have been certified and signed-off

 

 

 

Water damaged vehicles are similar, but go through a more stringent process, whereby everything electronic 300mm above the water level (or a level deemed to be the water level) MUST be replaced, and the same certification/compliance process begins

 

These vehicles are still flagged as imported as damaged, and that flag cannot be removed unless the Certified Light Vehicle Repair Specialist deems the damage to be minor and non-structural (ie. Guard/door, etc)

 

 

 

Hail damaged vehicles usually get the damaged flag removed, for reasons stated above - no structural damage

 

 

 

Also, when these vehicles are sold, a SIN (Supplier Information Notice) must be produced, and this indicated the country of origin and whether it was imported as a damaged vehicle

 

Misleading the public or blatantly lying about the true history of the vehicle is both immoral and illegal, and even Private Sellers are not immune if they mislead the public.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All vehicles I have done have been minor-damage vehicles, and have been safely and correctly repaired, registered and sold without issue, as any prospective buyer is most welcome to request copies of all relevant paperwork and the original pictures of the pre-repair damage.

 

 

 

 

 

There will always be people importing crap and flogging it off, nothing new there, and if the vehicle was too badly damaged, then by the time you bought it, freighted it, and repaired it, there'd be no profit, so no point in doing it

 

 

 

 

 

Would you rather have a vehicle that you know has been damaged and repaired to manufacturer's specs with all relevant checks done and a full clean-sheet certification and compliance, or a vehicle that's already in NZ, that may have had accident repairs (no way of telling easily) that may have been repaired by the lowest bidder to the Insurance Company??

 

I know my next personal vehicle will be a damaged Aussie import, for 2 reasons - Cost and transparency of repair

 

 




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  Reply # 1557580 22-May-2016 21:20
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So hard to explain the lady on FG who had no idea her vehicle was one of these?

 

And if a vehicle is not good enough to be repaired in Australia, why are we accepting of lower standards?






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  Reply # 1557611 22-May-2016 21:54
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Reading through this thread, that question has already been answered. I see plenty of CAT D's for sale here in the UK too, so it's not like it's just NZ. 


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