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  Reply # 1638082 21-Sep-2016 10:11
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There was a very funny reply to one of "those" letters doing the rounds a few years ago.

 

It involved a car and pedestrians who stepped out in front of the car and then made a complaint about the car nearly running them down.





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  Reply # 1638086 21-Sep-2016 10:18
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richms:

 

Yeah, had a couple of those letters. Not about slow driving tho ;)

 

 

Yes, I have had some of these usually from slow drivers I have passed quite quickly.

 

Slow drivers don't seem to understand that their driving is as antisocial as fast driving, in some cases worse.


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  Reply # 1646260 5-Oct-2016 22:29
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I'm a learner motorbike rider, so I'm often only comfortable at 10kph (or even 20kph) under the posted speed limit.

It seems crazy to me that we have this "zero tolerance" approach from police for speeding (not even 101kph is ok), yet then they say doing under 100kph is not ok.... ??? You need to stay in what a margin of 0.5kph?! What if you'd rather cruise along at 90kph so you don't need to constantly speedo check each time you hit a bit of a downhill section?





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  Reply # 1646263 5-Oct-2016 22:35
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Around here there are many old people who drive at 30-40kph in 50 zone, and 60-80kph in 100 zone. Not to mention ages to make a turn with a long queue of cars behind them. Now this is extremely controversial (when we get there will may have a different opinion) .... should these people be allowed to drive if their reaction time is so poor?





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  Reply # 1646318 6-Oct-2016 07:06
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joker97:

 

Around here there are many old people who drive at 30-40kph in 50 zone, and 60-80kph in 100 zone. Not to mention ages to make a turn with a long queue of cars behind them. Now this is extremely controversial (when we get there will may have a different opinion) .... should these people be allowed to drive if their reaction time is so poor?

 

 

I would rather they drive slow if they cant cope, but they need to be aware and move over if there is anyone behind them.

 

There is a hill here on Kaipatiki road that either many peoples cars cannot accelerate up, or they choose to drive at 35k up the hill. Its not very steap but I guess its people that do not want to floor it because that would break their car according to grandpa. Overtaking on it is doable but I shouldn't have to.

 

I am assuming that a nissan march is a car capable enough to get to 50-55km/h up a hill but the evidence I see on many maccas runs is that they can't.





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  Reply # 1646320 6-Oct-2016 07:11
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dman:

 

I'm a learner motorbike rider, so I'm often only comfortable at 10kph (or even 20kph) under the posted speed limit.

It seems crazy to me that we have this "zero tolerance" approach from police for speeding (not even 101kph is ok), yet then they say doing under 100kph is not ok.... ??? You need to stay in what a margin of 0.5kph?! What if you'd rather cruise along at 90kph so you don't need to constantly speedo check each time you hit a bit of a downhill section?

 

 

There is absolutely NOT zero tolerance to speed, it is Ok to do under the speed limit in all situations but don't be that person who sits on 80 or 90 and holds all other motorists up, pull off and let people pass, don't stick to the right lane and no one has a problem.

 

Not really that hard.


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  Reply # 1646990 6-Oct-2016 22:50
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ScuL:

 

gzt: Yeah it's really about the road code rather than any particular speed.

 

Indeed, and it doesn't just cover speed either.

 

Having had 45+ hours of professional lessons to obtain my license in Europe I fear that most Kiwi's sadly don't get enough exposure to the road code mostly receiving lessons from friends/family.

 

If I had to make a list the following bug me a lot:

 

* Not indicating left when exiting a roundabout (making oncoming traffic stop unnecessarily)
* Not indicating the correct direction when entering a roundabout (left when left, no indication when straight, right when going right)
* Not giving way when an object is on their path (if a vehicle blocks your side of the road you're meant to stay put until the oncoming car has cleared and then clear the object, not force your way in)
* Not giving way to bus drivers indicating to exit their stop (particularly bad in Auckland I always see people pushing their way in to get around the bus at all costs)
* Not keeping left when lanes to the left are clear (again, most Auckland drivers seem to enjoy doing 80~90kmh in the inner lane whereas cars doing the speed limit have to undertake them to get past)

 

And often rash pulling in an out of driveways or turns. The amount of times I nearly t-boned a driver failing to give way when coming out of a driveway..

 

As a general note, in my country of origin I was always taught to do at least the speed limit or preferably up to 10% above it in order to keep traffic flowing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As someone who learnt in a similar environment, I would agree.

 

The speed thing is interesting. In the UK (and presumably most EU countries) a similar rule exists, however there is a very different accepted definition of 'slow' in my experience.

 

On a B road with a 60mph limit (100kmh more or less) doing 50-60 would be fine. Should you be towing or driving a tractor, you would be expected to pull in and allow traffic to pass - those kind of things are regarded as 'slow' for the purposes of the rule, not just doing 10% less than the limit.

 

The classic slow vehicle expected to pull in is a tractor, which is usually (unless it's something like a JCB Fastrack) restricted by law to 25mph and is usually not safe to operate at even that low speed on the road due to implements mounted etc

 

The three main issues I see are

 

     

  1. Speed limits too high for the roads
  2. impatience that is breathtaking
  3. Poor road design





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  Reply # 1651107 14-Oct-2016 14:43
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richms:

 

I am assuming that a nissan march is a car capable enough to get to 50-55km/h up a hill but the evidence I see on many maccas runs is that they can't.

 

 

We have a March in the domestic fleet (a 950cc auto variant) and it really struggles up steep hills.  There are a few in Nelson that it can't do 50k up.

 

It's the only car I've driven where having the AC turned off makes a noticeable difference in performance!





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  Reply # 1651117 14-Oct-2016 14:52
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Geektastic:

 

     

  1. Speed limits too high for the roads

 

 

In NZ ... 

 

Decreasing the speed limit (early 70s) from 100 - 80 was followed by an increase in the road toll by about 20% over the five years following.

 

Increasing the speed limit again (1985) in NZ from 80 - 100 was not followed by an increase in the road toll (5 year average).

 

 





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  Reply # 1651118 14-Oct-2016 14:55
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MikeAqua:

 

We have a March in the domestic fleet (a 950cc auto variant) and it really struggles up steep hills.  There are a few in Nelson that it can't do 50k up.

 

It's the only car I've driven where having the AC turned off makes a noticeable difference in performance!

 

 

Really? Why the hell are they allowed on the road? Hope that they start getting tickets for being too slow in that case. I always just assumed that the people driving them were just too useless to push the accellerator down all the way.





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  Reply # 1651256 14-Oct-2016 18:55
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richms:

 

MikeAqua:

 

We have a March in the domestic fleet (a 950cc auto variant) and it really struggles up steep hills.  There are a few in Nelson that it can't do 50k up.

 

It's the only car I've driven where having the AC turned off makes a noticeable difference in performance!

 

 

Really? Why the hell are they allowed on the road? 

 

 

That is a very elitist view. The owners of those vehicles pay tax to contribute to roading maintenance and may not necessarily be able to afford a more powerful car.

 

It wasn't that long ago I had an 80kw petrol Kia Rio because it was what I could afford at the time I bought it, and I pulled over on very rare occasions when I was holding anyone up on a hill.


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  Reply # 1651284 14-Oct-2016 20:20
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MikeAqua:

 

Geektastic:

 

     

  1. Speed limits too high for the roads

 

 

In NZ ... 

 

Decreasing the speed limit (early 70s) from 100 - 80 was followed by an increase in the road toll by about 20% over the five years following.

 

Increasing the speed limit again (1985) in NZ from 80 - 100 was not followed by an increase in the road toll (5 year average).

 

 

 

 

I think you have that wrong.

 

1973 was a shocker with 843 deaths giving an average for the preceding 5 years of 692. The speed limit was dropped Dec 1973 and the road toll dropped over next 5 years to an average of 654.

 

The average for the 5 years after 1985 was 758.

 

http://www.transport.govt.nz/research/roadtoll/annualroadtollhistoricalinformation/


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  Reply # 1657189 25-Oct-2016 08:04
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richms:

 

MikeAqua:

 

We have a March in the domestic fleet (a 950cc auto variant) and it really struggles up steep hills.  There are a few in Nelson that it can't do 50k up.

 

It's the only car I've driven where having the AC turned off makes a noticeable difference in performance!

 

 

Really? Why the hell are they allowed on the road? Hope that they start getting tickets for being too slow in that case. I always just assumed that the people driving them were just too useless to push the accellerator down all the way.

 

 

I drive a 35 year old car which probably makes similar power to the March stated above, so I should get it off the road because I may take a few seconds longer to accelerate and hold up someones day by 3-5 seconds? I can easily do 100KM/h on most roads, so I don't feel I'm holding up traffic, but just give me a couple seconds more to get there. I don't think it will ruin anyone's day waiting a couple more seconds to get up to speed (I would have thought?) smile

 

The view I have is the speed limit is just that, a limit, not a target and even 1KM over it is breaking the law. I admit though, sometimes I do speed as I notice when travelling between Auckland and Hamilton for example, I seem to be the only one doing the speed limit and everyone gets pissed off with me for driving at 100KM/h and I feel pressured to go faster. Even cars with trailers and trucks are passing me when I'm doing 100KM/h. I thought my speedo may be out, so checked with GPS, and I'm definitely doing 100 and being passed by these things which by law should be doing 90! But if I'm doing 100KM/h and I get some idiot behind me who is so eager to break the law that they have to tailgate me and make driving dangerous for the both of us, then they can just wait behind me until there's a passing lane, but if I'm going slower than 100, I will pull over and let them past.

 

So, I don't have a problem with people getting fines for doing 1KM/h over the limit, but at the same time, how slow is too slow? I think it largely depends on the drivers ability and the road conditions. If they're in an old car or something and can't go any faster, that's fine, pull over and let the traffic past, but if it's an issue where the person is not confident enough, then maybe they shouldn't hold a license? It seems that in NZ it is a right to have a license, but it shouldn't be that way, it should be a privilege for those of us who make every effort to obey all the road rules/laws to make driving safer for all of us. Again, I'm not perfect and if I get a fine for speeding or something, I'd have no problem owning my mistake.


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  Reply # 1657256 25-Oct-2016 10:14
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How slow is too slow? When the car behind wants to get past?




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  Reply # 1657268 25-Oct-2016 10:26
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joker97: How slow is too slow? When the car behind wants to get past?

 

I guess there would be some individual judgement regarding this,  if you are below (-10) then you should be courteous. The question is then, what about the guy travelling 120 when you're going 100, well I think in the interest of allowing them to pass safely, i'd assist by pulling over where possible. I'm not the police, I can *555 them, but holding them up could lead to a dangerous overtake. You can be less courteous, in the form of the horn, flashing your lights, giving them the middle.


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