Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


5248 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1133

Trusted
Subscriber

Topic # 203176 20-Sep-2016 16:25
Send private message

NZ is one of the few countries that still drive on the left hand side of the road. 

 

Seems to me we'd have a much larger range of cars vehicles of all kinds available, both new and second hand.....and cheaper, if we changed to the other side. 

 

Plus the roads would be safer once everyone got used to it and the tourists (most of them), of course, wouldn't have to adapt at all. 

Yes...there would be time allowed - 10 years? - for retiring old RHD vehicles from the fleet. Maybe we could also offer a subsidy or incentive to buy a new left-hand drive vehicle sooner. Add more cash to make it electric....and we have great way to lower transport emissions at the same time. 

We're spending $8  billion on new roads for trucks and $1.9 billion on defense hardware that will never probably never actually be used. A $5,000 subsidy to make the transition would be affordable on that scale. 

I've driven on both sides for years and years each......It just takes a few minutes to get used to the mirror-image version of stuff we know well. 

No need to do much on the roads except re-paint the markings and move the signs to the other side of the road. On-ramps become off-ramps and so on. 

It would be a big change for some people.....but overall it has a lot of benefits to offer a few years down the track. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
1456 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 324

Trusted

  Reply # 1636659 20-Sep-2016 16:30
5 people support this post
Send private message

Would be a surprising amount of extra road re-designs, basically every intersection, roundabout, off ramp is designed for it's direction of traffic.  Is an interesting thought experiment.  Sweden did the switch back in the 60s before major roading projects.

 

Maybe if Japan changed over we might need to, for the used car market!


Banana?
4488 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1073

Subscriber

  Reply # 1636662 20-Sep-2016 16:32
Send private message

Funny, as I was driving home last night I was wondering the exact same thing.

 

There would be some pretty massive costs, motorway offramps wouldn't all switch over nicely (most would though),

 

Imagine the logistics of changing the paint and signs - wouldn't it all have to happen in a very short time frame (to stop confusion of roads and signs being all wrong before the 'change')?

 

I think any government will put it into the 'too hard' basket (unless Australia, Japan and the UK and India do it first - then we will run out of cars).




5248 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1133

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1636670 20-Sep-2016 16:45
One person supports this post
Send private message

jonb:

 

Would be a surprising amount of extra road re-designs, basically every intersection, roundabout, off ramp is designed for it's direction of traffic.  Is an interesting thought experiment.  Sweden did the switch back in the 60s before major roading projects.

 

Maybe if Japan changed over we might need to, for the used car market!

 

 

I read a bit about the Swedish experience...and the roads camber / slope on the roads and drainage didn't need any changes. Places that sit at the lights to go onto the motorway and up coming off the motorway to lights before entering the road way. Yes, the moving of traffic lights would be a big logistical exercise over night. One suggestion was to lower all the speed limits by 20% of a year while the change occurred...and to use a corps of human or mobile temporary traffic lights while the fixed ones were re-located.

 

Of course there is the old joke about phasing it in: trucks on Monday, cars on Tuesday. :-)  





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


920 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 281

Trusted

  Reply # 1636671 20-Sep-2016 16:49
2 people support this post
Send private message

IMHO Probably not worth the effort to change. Its mainly stuff like causeways etc, and they would all need to be re-designed and signed simultaneously. I would put this idea in the "too hard" basket.

 

We should feed the hungry kids first. Children should never have to suffer, they don't get to choose.






13351 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6280

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1636673 20-Sep-2016 16:49
Send private message

A lot of roads would need a lot of work to redo the banking of corners etc. I really do not see any great advantages and as for the chaos that would ensue, look at all the drivers that could not get the change of intersection indicating right and I still encounter drivers who get the right hand rule wrong





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 




5248 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1133

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1636674 20-Sep-2016 16:50
Send private message

trig42:

 

Funny, as I was driving home last night I was wondering the exact same thing.

 

There would be some pretty massive costs, motorway offramps wouldn't all switch over nicely (most would though),

 

Imagine the logistics of changing the paint and signs - wouldn't it all have to happen in a very short time frame (to stop confusion of roads and signs being all wrong before the 'change')?

 

I think any government will put it into the 'too hard' basket (unless Australia, Japan and the UK and India do it first - then we will run out of cars).

 

 

Changes would really only be a intersections and then REALLY only necessary at the busiest, most complex intersections. The vast majority would be just moving the stop signs to the other corner and a pain stripe. Roundabouts are the easiest of all.....just need the blue arrow signs replaced. 

 

I can see how it could be largely over in a week, with a few compromises on a few problematic interchanges. Trying to think of which ones. Most of the new interchanges are already roundabouts......and wouldn't require anything, really. Thinking of the Greenlane and Ellerslie monsters roundabouts on the southern motorway in Auckland: no real changes needed at all.....just drive the other way and move the entry-rationing lights to what are now the off-ramps. 

 

 





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet




5248 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1133

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1636676 20-Sep-2016 16:52
Send private message

MikeB4:

 

A lot of roads would need a lot of work to redo the banking of corners etc. I really do not see any great advantages and as for the chaos that would ensue, look at all the drivers that could not get the change of intersection indicating right and I still encounter drivers who get the right hand rule wrong

 

 

Think about it. The banking in the corners doesn't need to be changed. A vehicle going along it at 50kph or whatever speed is going to have the same centripetal force no matter which direction....particularly in the mid-point of the curve - accelerating or decelerating hardly matters.  

 

As for the road rules....we all know drivers who just shouldn't be driving. 





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


194 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 35


  Reply # 1636677 20-Sep-2016 16:53
One person supports this post
Send private message

I would love to see this happen, as I'm slightly more comfortable at left-hand drive. But cannot see it happening till Australia does it first, and as I've just bought a new car that I expect to drive for at least ten years, hopefully not too soon either.

 

Samoa recently went the other way from RH drive to LH drive to mesh in with Aus and NZ, and to avoid "expensive left-hand drive imports from America".




5248 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1133

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1636678 20-Sep-2016 16:54
Send private message

bluedisk:

 

I would love to see this happen, as I'm slightly more comfortable at left-hand drive. But cannot see it happening till Australia does it first, and as I've just bought a new car that I expect to drive for at least ten years, hopefully not too soon either.

 

Samoa recently went the other way from RH drive to LH drive to mesh in with Aus and NZ, and to avoid "expensive left-hand drive imports from America".

 

 

Maybe they meant cheap LHD imports from China. 





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


194 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 35


  Reply # 1636681 20-Sep-2016 16:57
Send private message

Correction: I meant Samoa changed from LH drive to our RH drive


4303 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2568

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1636682 20-Sep-2016 16:57
One person supports this post
Send private message

What would happen to all the right hand drive vehicles? - export them to Japan?  wink





Sideface


13351 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6280

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1636683 20-Sep-2016 16:58
One person supports this post
Send private message

we should also change the way angle parking is done. We should back in and drive out that way the driver has better view of the traffic coming.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


1852 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 25

Trusted

  Reply # 1636684 20-Sep-2016 16:59
3 people support this post
Send private message

I don't see it happening. UK, Australia, Japan, India all drive on the left hand side.

 

Samoa recently (2009) changed from the right side to left side:

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8243110.stm

 

It would be an insanely massive project to change... it would be even more difficult for UK and Aussie... i really don't see it ever happening.


Glurp
8470 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3890

Subscriber

  Reply # 1636685 20-Sep-2016 17:03
Send private message

Samoa would feel pretty stupid if they had to change back. The Swedes seemed to get through it okay when they did it, not sure how much confidence I have in our drivers. I might not plan any road trips for a few years. Still, it's an interesting idea but I have doubts about the practicality. Like Britain, we are an island and maybe that helps make it work since there are no borders where the rules suddenly change.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


486 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 110


  Reply # 1636689 20-Sep-2016 17:05
2 people support this post
Send private message

Linuxluver:

 

NZ is one of the few countries that still drive on the left hand side of the road. 

 

Seems to me we'd have a much larger range of cars vehicles of all kinds available, both new and second hand.....and cheaper, if we changed to the other side. 

 

 

I disagree. A lot of the major car manufacturers have global platforms underpinning a wide range of cars\brands. So whether it is left or right hand drive doesn't really make a lot of difference

 

As a well known example, the Volkswagen Group's 'MQB' platform, this underpins the Audi A3, Audi TT, VW Golf, Skoda Superb, Skoda Octavia, VW Passt, VW Tiguan, Audi Q2 as well as others.

 

And it's not just in the small cars\crossovers. The top end of the market is the same as well. The newest Audi Q7 and brand new Bentley Bentayga (2 vastly different price points) share the same underpinnings to a degree.

 

The same evens applies to the supercar\hypercar market too, all the McLaren's that have been released since the MP4-12C have used variants of the central tub

 

The same logic will also apply to the like's of Ford, Honda and GM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.