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  # 1774053 2-May-2017 09:59
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TimA:

 

Yep cant go past the BMW's, Please just dont use your X5 offroad, They blow their transfer cases when they have to shift power forward. Only good for snow or really slippery conditions. How ever those straight 6 petrol's are amazing.

 

 

Haha, it was bought strictly as a motorway cruiser for the family. We are all very tall and it was the only thing we could all fit in comfortably that wasn't a people carrier/van. I've had M70's, M62's and M54's and specifically wanted the M54 for this. It's far from a screamer but it has more than enough power and in 18 months it's at 11.2l/100km. I wouldn't get near that in a V8.

 

TimA:

 

I have a M52B28 in my E36 and im sitting on 200KM, The engine runs smoother and quieter than most new engines, Doesnt miss a single beat. Cant even hear it running or feel it running when its on. The other massive benefit is that my little 3 series is so damn quiet on the road compared to others.
My ancient BMW is quieter and smoother than my mums brand new Mk7 Golf. 
Oh yeah the other part, its insanely reliable..

 


Yep, my 1990 e34 535is is at 320k and it's far smoother than the 2007 Focus we just bought.

 

[e] typo


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  # 1774055 2-May-2017 10:00
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martyyn:

 

 

 

Haha, it was bought strictly as a motorway cruiser for the family. We are all very tall and it was the only thing we could all fit in comfortably that wasn't a people carrier/van. I've had M70's, M62's and M54's and specifically wanted the M54 for this. It far from a screamer but it has more than enough power and in 18 months it's at 11.2l/100km. I wouldn't get near that in a V8.

 

Yep, my e34 535is is at 320k and it's far smoother than the 2007 Focus we just bought.

 

 

 

 

 

 If its manual ill buy it. Also had a M62 in an E39 and it was a great engine. Took a hell of a hiding. 
I got about 14.7L/100 on the highway and 30L/100 around town lol.

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 1774056 2-May-2017 10:01
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TimA:

 

If its manual ill buy it.

 

 

It is....and you can't afford it ;)


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  # 1774065 2-May-2017 10:13
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martyyn:

 

TimA:

 

If its manual ill buy it.

 

 

It is....and you can't afford it ;)

 

 

Is it for sale? 


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  # 1774704 2-May-2017 23:16
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MikeAqua:

 

You do not want to own a high kms Subaru.  They are mechanically complex vehicles.

 

 

 

 

Compare them to a front drive V6 engined car (with east - west mounted engine) such as a Mitsi Diamante. Some V6 east west engines you have to remove the inlet mainifold to replace the rear 3 spark plugs. And often bolt on things like powersteering pump, alternator, water pump ect will be difficult to get at.

 

And on my Merc Vito - commonrail diesel 4cyl east west engine, removing the alternator was a mission. As it was jammed in a space between the firewall / engine block / front subframe. The service manual said that you have to remove the right inner CV joint and fixed half shaft to make enough room to remove the alternator. Thankfully just unbolting the inner CV joint gave me enough room to just wriggle out the alternator. Im dreading if I ever need to replace either of the engine mounted fuel pumps (yes there are 2 of them), the water pump or vacuum pump. Never mind the cam chains. And that is assuming that my engine doesn't have the "black death" problem - leaking injector seals. Which is a common problem on that engine.

 

Yet on your average Subaru, just remove the radiator. Then you can easily access the front of the engine to replace the cam belt, water pump ect. Powersteering pump, aircon compressor, alternator, starter motor are all up top and easy to get at. Biggest problem with alot of Subaru engines is the fact that the thermostat is located low down as part of the water pump. If a small head gasket leak starts, the air getting into the cooling system causes an air lock in the heater and coolant bypass pipes. This in turn means that the thermostat can't accurately sense the engine temp. The engine will then get a little too warm, so the ECU turns on the cooling fans. The stone cold water returning from the radiator causes the thermostat to close, as there is virtually no hot water coming from the heater return and bypass pipes. So the engine then dies due to overheating. This basicly means that Subies can't tolerate neglected cooling systems like what some other cars can.

 

My 4AF powered Corolla didn't suffer any air lock issues, as the thermostat was mounted at the same height as the cylinder head. The bypass pipes were almost completely level - no air locks.  So I was able to keep driving it for well over a year with a failed head gasket. I didn't bother repairing it as I had a 4AGE lined up to be installed into it. In the 4AF's final days, If I turned it off and tried reatarting it when hot. The engine would sometime hydro lock. The head gasket leak was that bad, it would fill up one of the cylinders with enough water that the engine couldn't turn over.

 

Eitherway, some repairs are actually easier on Subaru's than other cars. And also remember for awhile, car dealers just loved importing turbo subarus and then selling them on finance to young people. Who would then thrash them, and due to hardly being able to afford the repayments, would not be able to afford proper servicing. So no wonder they got a bad reputation for reliability. 






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  # 1775276 4-May-2017 06:57
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Generally I wouldn't touch a jap or euro car with 200,000+ km on it.

 

I would for a Commodore or Falcon but that is because I can repair most things on those cars and they are over engineered as far as the drive train etc. so will go for a lot of km.

 

A smaller engine is stressed for longer so will potentially see issues sooner.

 

If you want a car for another 6-10 years at 20,000km a year (assumed) that is 320,000 - 400,000km so you are looking at potentially a rebuild of an engine and/ or trans in that time.


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  # 1775377 4-May-2017 09:43
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Want vrs need vrs can afford.

 

Maybe you need to compromise somewhere.

 

Smaller car might give you lower km and more reliability than a larger older car.

 

 

 

If must be subaru, maybe look at backpackers as they are popular amongst the tourist set.


 
 
 
 




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  # 1775386 4-May-2017 09:58
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Yea happy to compromise, just wanted to know if I should even consider a 200,000+km car.  Which by the posts I am not going to go in that direction.


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  # 1776342 5-May-2017 14:42
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I'd honestly not bother with anything over 100,000kms. Trust me, I'm not flooding with cash, but it's better to save up a few more years/months and have something decent that'll last and require minimal repairs. The only thing I've bought for my 2012 honda insight in 1 and a half years is a warrant and rego. All I see coming up is wiper blades and possibly some engine oil / service but nothing else. Definitely pays off in the long run. My old Toyota Camry was 310,000 kms 1995 and I was always spending $600-$1,500 a year in repairs... 





gz ftw


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  # 1776360 5-May-2017 15:03
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The bottom line is, you are buying an ongoing cash cow with no bottom. But the cash goes the other way. But oh it's so good looking and drives so well!





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 1776367 5-May-2017 15:06
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I have to add, having owned many models of cars so far, Toyota Corolla is the only model of car that seems to be exempt from that statement. Maybe it's a combination of designed with high tolerances, built with rather basic parts, and driven by sloths. (I should be ok to say that coz I've owned a few).

 

All other models (NA & turbo, manual & auto, car & SUV, jap & euro), once it hits 60,000ks it starts to bleed cash. Sometimes a little sometimes a lot. But that's not what other people experience, or so they tell me - more like nearing 200,000ks. One should consider the life of a car (one not built for commercial purpose) in its totality to be a max of 200,000ks. Sometimes you get there faster, sometimes later, just like people.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 1776384 5-May-2017 15:37
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Blanket "wouldn't buy a car over Xkms" is a little ridiculous. With good servicing and care, the engines, drivetrains, gearboxes, bodies of Japanese or German cars will have no trouble getting beyond 200,000kms. Many would do 300,000+ just fine as well.

 

Look for cars that have had their manufacturer's recommended maintenance schedule reasonably well adhered to, whether at the stealership or through private garages. Cars that just go to Oil Changers every 10,000kms and nothing else are questionable. It doesn't have to be exactly by the book, 10kkms later for a fuel filter change, spark plug change, or coolant flush ain't gonna hurt much, but 100kkms probably will do a bit.

 

Don't forget that age is also a strong factor. When talking about anything made of rubber, or any other age-wearing material - i.e. gaskets, seals, hoses, plastic tanks, springs, rustable metal, these things often degrade less with use than with time. Especially so if the car lives its life outside, by the sea, in Rotorua, sitting in hot sun etc.

 

For example, a well maintained 5 year old lets say Mazda 6 (as the ubiquitous lease fleet car) with 200,000kms on the clock, where most of the driving was on motorways at 80-100KM/hour, will probably be more reliable and cost less to maintain than a 20 year old Corolla with 100,000kms. Which car will last the longest with that maintenance done is anyone's guess.

 

Conversely, a well maintained 5 year old Suzuki Swift that's got a small engine and 200,000kms of constant stop start, no warmup before running, might be no more reliable than a 20 year old BMW with the same KMs on the clock under different driving conditions.


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  # 1776386 5-May-2017 15:44
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spronkey:[snip]

 

For example, a well maintained 5 year old lets say Mazda 6 (as the ubiquitous lease fleet car) with 200,000kms on the clock, where most of the driving was on motorways at 80-100KM/hour,

 

 

That counts out Auckland and Wellington cars!


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  # 1776388 5-May-2017 15:45
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spronkey:

 

Blanket "wouldn't buy a car over Xkms" is a little ridiculous. With good servicing and care, the engines, drivetrains, gearboxes, bodies of Japanese or German cars will have no trouble getting beyond 200,000kms. Many would do 300,000+ just fine as well.

 

Look for cars that have had their manufacturer's recommended maintenance schedule reasonably well adhered to, whether at the stealership or through private garages. Cars that just go to Oil Changers every 10,000kms and nothing else are questionable. It doesn't have to be exactly by the book, 10kkms later for a fuel filter change, spark plug change, or coolant flush ain't gonna hurt much, but 100kkms probably will do a bit.

 

Don't forget that age is also a strong factor. When talking about anything made of rubber, or any other age-wearing material - i.e. gaskets, seals, hoses, plastic tanks, springs, rustable metal, these things often degrade less with use than with time. Especially so if the car lives its life outside, by the sea, in Rotorua, sitting in hot sun etc.

 

For example, a well maintained 5 year old lets say Mazda 6 (as the ubiquitous lease fleet car) with 200,000kms on the clock, where most of the driving was on motorways at 80-100KM/hour, will probably be more reliable and cost less to maintain than a 20 year old Corolla with 100,000kms. Which car will last the longest with that maintenance done is anyone's guess.

 

Conversely, a well maintained 5 year old Suzuki Swift that's got a small engine and 200,000kms of constant stop start, no warmup before running, might be no more reliable than a 20 year old BMW with the same KMs on the clock under different driving conditions.

 

 

Exactly. If you had all these details and the car is favourable, yes go for it. The trick is ... well ... most secondhand cars you'd be lucky to know the date of the last service, nevermind what was done at the service.

 

If it's had the life of a princess and fed organic everything and sees a doctor every 3 months and the dentist every 2, well it's gonna age well. But this is NZ you're talking about. Fast food and binge drinking rule. Hence the rule of dead by 200,000ks if you didn't have all that information is my rule of thumb.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 1776391 5-May-2017 15:50
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RunningMan:

 

spronkey:[snip]

 

For example, a well maintained 5 year old lets say Mazda 6 (as the ubiquitous lease fleet car) with 200,000kms on the clock, where most of the driving was on motorways at 80-100KM/hour,

 

 

That counts out Auckland and Wellington cars!

 

 

 

 

Best to buy something our of the south island, No rust and long flat roads.


KMS means nothing, The life it has lived and the care it has had means it all.
Take the above ancient 535IS in mint condition with more kms than your average jap. Still mint.
My ancient 328I (not sport ffs) 220KMS and still mint. 
If it comes with no history its because it doesn't have any or they dont want you to see it.


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