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979 posts

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  # 1798618 12-Jun-2017 16:29
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In an extension to the OP's question, what is the correct way to warn oncoming drivers of danger ahead at night time?

 

 

 

The other night, on a dark country road, on a foggy night, I came across a car that had spun out on a corner and had it's nose in the ditch and tail out in the coming lane on a blind corner. The people had help on the way so didn't need anything from me but were worried someone was going to come around the corner and crash into them. So I continued and flashed oncoming traffic up the road - short blips of high beam. Some people misunderstood, got angry and fully high-beamed me. No doubt they figured it out around the corner, but it would have been too late.


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  # 1798633 12-Jun-2017 16:49
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elpenguino:

 

 

 

72% of fatal crashes caused by males :-(

 

 

To make sense of data like that you have to at least know what proportion of total kms are driven by males in NZ.

 

And I think those are just driver stats. They don't consider whether the driver was at fault.  Just who was driving the car in which people were injured.





Mike

 
 
 
 


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  # 1798638 12-Jun-2017 16:51
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Agreed


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  # 1798745 12-Jun-2017 17:56
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tripper1000:

 

In an extension to the OP's question, what is the correct way to warn oncoming drivers of danger ahead at night time?

 

 The other night, on a dark country road, on a foggy night, I came across a car that had spun out on a corner and had it's nose in the ditch and tail out in the coming lane on a blind corner. The people had help on the way so didn't need anything from me but were worried someone was going to come around the corner and crash into them. So I continued and flashed oncoming traffic up the road - short blips of high beam. Some people misunderstood, got angry and fully high-beamed me. No doubt they figured it out around the corner, but it would have been too late.

 

 

A safety triangle is the best way to deal with this. Obviously you need to use common sense when placing it so that you don't put yourself or other road users at risk.


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  # 1799267 13-Jun-2017 12:35
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tripper1000:

 

In an extension to the OP's question, what is the correct way to warn oncoming drivers of danger ahead at night time?

 

 

 

The other night, on a dark country road, on a foggy night, I came across a car that had spun out on a corner and had it's nose in the ditch and tail out in the coming lane on a blind corner. The people had help on the way so didn't need anything from me but were worried someone was going to come around the corner and crash into them. So I continued and flashed oncoming traffic up the road - short blips of high beam. Some people misunderstood, got angry and fully high-beamed me. No doubt they figured it out around the corner, but it would have been too late.

 

 

Quick blips are usually indicative that there is a cop or speed camera up the road ...

 

Either way, a public service :-)





My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


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  # 1808267 28-Jun-2017 14:49
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I live on top of a huge hill and we get fog really bad. If someone doesn't have their lights I honk the whole time while driving past them. This is essential because I can barely see 1 metre in front and they are a danger to everyone.





gz ftw


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  # 1808273 28-Jun-2017 15:05
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About 3 years ago I started driving with my lights on all the time, because, why not?

 

It's now muscle memory: seat belt, start car, lights on, go. I agree that driving lights should be mandatory like other countries.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1808275 28-Jun-2017 15:06
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tripper1000:

 

In an extension to the OP's question, what is the correct way to warn oncoming drivers of danger ahead at night time?

 

 

 

The other night, on a dark country road, on a foggy night, I came across a car that had spun out on a corner and had it's nose in the ditch and tail out in the coming lane on a blind corner. The people had help on the way so didn't need anything from me but were worried someone was going to come around the corner and crash into them. So I continued and flashed oncoming traffic up the road - short blips of high beam. Some people misunderstood, got angry and fully high-beamed me. No doubt they figured it out around the corner, but it would have been too late.

 

 

 

 

A lot of cars have a warning triangle that you set up on the road before the incident site. Stick a concrete block behind it and that'll slow them down.


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  # 1808306 28-Jun-2017 15:21
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Different people have different issues. Some will try to figure it out, some will be aggressive, some are just stupid. One problem with low visibility is that many people still don't realise that just because they can see other cars does not necessarily mean other cars can see them. They think their lights are only for them. This is a particular problem around twilight. 

 

I don't know a good answer for this. Just flash your lights and hope the other person gets the idea. If they don't, at least you have tried. By flash your lights, I think the best technique is to switch them off and on a couple of times. That will call attention without acting like an alarm signal.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  # 1808317 28-Jun-2017 15:38
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I'm not sure if it's from following this thread that I'm noticing it more, but it is becoming increasingly common on the motorways in the evenings, and flashing lights don't always seem to work, some are oblivious to the fact that their lights are off, no wonder they don't note anyone driving behind them...

 

Driving lights would be a start, but not all will activate tail lights. Also, perhaps if light up dashes weren't becoming more common... Older cars, you'd know you didn't have your lights on by the fact you couldn't see any of your instruments...


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  # 1808335 28-Jun-2017 16:09
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NzBeagle:

 

I'm not sure if it's from following this thread that I'm noticing it more, but it is becoming increasingly common on the motorways in the evenings, and flashing lights don't always seem to work, some are oblivious to the fact that their lights are off, no wonder they don't note anyone driving behind them...

 

Driving lights would be a start, but not all will activate tail lights. Also, perhaps if light up dashes weren't becoming more common... Older cars, you'd know you didn't have your lights on by the fact you couldn't see any of your instruments...

 

 

 

 

With modern cars we'll all have DRL soon - so even if you don't turn headlights on at least there's a blinding white led strip. 





gz ftw


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  # 1808354 28-Jun-2017 16:28
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b0untypure1:

 

 

 

With modern cars we'll all have DRL soon - so even if you don't turn headlights on at least there's a blinding white led strip. 

 

 

Disappointingly not even an option on my Mazda 3 SP25 (2015) - not even as an accessory.

 

 





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  # 1808391 28-Jun-2017 17:40
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The problem with honking or flashing lights at people doing dumb crap on the roads, is they are usually to dumb to realize that its directed at them, or misinterpret you trying to correct their stupidity as being aggressive.





Richard rich.ms

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  # 1808414 28-Jun-2017 18:27
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Rikkitic:

 

Different people have different issues. Some will try to figure it out, some will be aggressive, some are just stupid. One problem with low visibility is that many people still don't realise that just because they can see other cars does not necessarily mean other cars can see them. They think their lights are only for them. This is a particular problem around twilight. 

 

I don't know a good answer for this. Just flash your lights and hope the other person gets the idea. If they don't, at least you have tried. By flash your lights, I think the best technique is to switch them off and on a couple of times. That will call attention without acting like an alarm signal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Becoming a large issue the police are realising. Been a big social media push recently on people in newer car with that good ol light switch on 'auto'

 

 

 

Forgetting auto means, dark. Not top lit fog or similar.


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