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861 posts

Ultimate Geek


# 215264 19-Jun-2017 18:18
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Hi all,

 

I am looking at a Nissan 18G Manual Car.

 

I currently have a Nissan 15M CVT car and am very happy, the only thing wrong is no clutch, I miss the manual too much.

 

I know lot of people don't like the CVT transmission but for those who know a little more than me what is your impression of the Nissan manual transmission?

 

I know the engine is relatively reliable and has a timing chain rather than a cam belt.

 

I would like to get a tow bar for light trailer towing hence the other motivation to change.

 

Let me know your thoughts if you know about Nissan gearboxes.

 

regards

 

John

 

 





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Mad Scientist
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  # 1803602 19-Jun-2017 19:18
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1st question is what year is the CVT. WHen they were new (NIssan, 90s) they were not reliable enough to last the lifespan of the car. I think they're ok after a while.

 

I had a 2012 Nissan CVT. CVT was very slow to wind up. (like cranking up a rubber band literally!) But very robust and did the job. Just don't try and overtake in a hurry. By the time the rubber band wound up the overtake opportunity is gone haha. It was also very loud! Louder than the engine! My wife keeps commenting the engine is so noisy ... umm dear it's the rubber band winding up!





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861 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 1803631 19-Jun-2017 19:46
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Mine is a 2006 and you are right about being sluggish, it is the same on my wifes 2005 Note.

 

Neither are noisy which is good.

 

I could put a towbar on my car but it would be like putting a towbar on a 1200 manual, I think it would be a little under-powered.

 

I dont plan on towing heavy loads but I towed a trailer with just under a ton of stones with my Corolla wagon, company Corollas were pretty much bulletproof, I just cant afford one these days.

 

 

 

John

 

 

 

 





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  # 1803632 19-Jun-2017 19:49
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It's only loud when you rev the engine, eg going up the endless number of hills in Dunedin.





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  # 1803787 20-Jun-2017 09:05
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The first Nissan CVT transmissions were not very reliable. Nissan manual gearboxes are generally bulletproof. I would recommend a manual transmission over a CVT for reliability.

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  # 1803788 20-Jun-2017 09:15
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1eStar: The first Nissan CVT transmissions were not very reliable. Nissan manual gearboxes are generally bulletproof. I would recommend a manual transmission over a CVT for reliability.

 

 

 

Would definitely agree. I heard an outlander with a bigbore and a CVT the other day. Wow it sounded like absolute garbage. Just sits at 5K RPM and slowly starts to move why making massive amounts of noise. 


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  # 1803863 20-Jun-2017 10:04
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The issue with trailers is not towing them.  It's slowing them down in a controlled manner when you have to brake.

 

A corolla will tow a tonne of rocks but, it won't slow it down very well.





Mike

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  # 1803869 20-Jun-2017 10:12
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MikeAqua:

 

The issue with trailers is not towing them.  It's slowing them down in a controlled manner when you have to brake.

 

A corolla will tow a tonne of rocks but, it won't slow it down very well.

 



I thought the CVT was direct drive on acceleration and deceleration? Inherently weak design so its not suggested to tow anything of any weight with.
I towed 1.8 tonnes + braked car trailer behind my automatic 328I and i'd hate to imagine what it would have been like un braked. But it was a trooper passing cars going up the bridge at 80! In fifth too. That torque money-mouth

 

 


 
 
 
 


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  # 1803899 20-Jun-2017 10:58
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Trailer brakes make a huge difference. Technology is actually getting a little bit clever now. 

 

European caravan manufactures (some) are fitting sway control and other active safety measures to caravans with electric actuated brakes.

 

In Aussie, the legal maximum un-braked towing weight is 750kg for towing.  In NZ it's 2,000kg which in my opinion is too high.





Mike

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  # 1803904 20-Jun-2017 11:02
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MikeAqua:

 

Trailer brakes make a huge difference. Technology is actually getting a little bit clever now. 

 

European caravan manufactures (some) are fitting sway control and other active safety measures to caravans with electric actuated brakes.

 

In Aussie, the legal maximum un-braked towing weight is 750kg for towing.  In NZ it's 2,000kg which in my opinion is too high.

 

 

 

 

My towbar is 900KG unbraked max, 1800KG braked. 
AL-KO ESC is the technology used in caravans, senses lateral G and applied brakes to counteract. 

 

http://alkoesc.com.au/ 

 

PDF for jayco trailers.

 

http://alkoesc.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/JaycoManualV6LR-web.pdf 


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  # 1804043 20-Jun-2017 14:21
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TimA:

 

My towbar is 900KG unbraked max, 1800KG braked. 
AL-KO ESC is the technology used in caravans, senses lateral G and applied brakes to counteract. 

 

http://alkoesc.com.au/ 

 

PDF for jayco trailers.

 

http://alkoesc.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/JaycoManualV6LR-web.pdf 

 

 

I think those are the legal European towing limits?

 

In NZ our vehicles are rated to suit the Aussie regs.  So a Pajero and an ASX have the same unbraked tow-weight rating.

 

 





Mike

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  # 1804439 21-Jun-2017 08:30
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Problem with CVT and towing is that it's always using friction to transfer drive, and there's always some slip between the surfaces, be that belt or chain between variable pulleys, or design like the "extroid".  Over-load them and they'll wear out fast.

 

Conventional autos are the way to go now for regular towing IMO. Not manual with 4/5 cylinder new diesels - avoid.

 

AA has a (unfortunately not very comprehensive) list of tow ratings for common vehicles here.




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Ultimate Geek


  # 1804440 21-Jun-2017 08:39
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Fred99:

 

Problem with CVT and towing is that it's always using friction to transfer drive, and there's always some slip between the surfaces, be that belt or chain between variable pulleys, or design like the "extroid".  Over-load them and they'll wear out fast.

 

Conventional autos are the way to go now for regular towing IMO. Not manual with 4/5 cylinder new diesels - avoid.

 

AA has a (unfortunately not very comprehensive) list of tow ratings for common vehicles here.

 

 

Interesting, I thought it would not be a good idea towing with the CVT but I thought manual would have been better than Auto for towing.

 

I only tow about once or twice a year but I am looking at towing a Kayak trailer a little more often hence my question.

 

If I did get a tow bar I am sure I will get roped into friends and family moving / gardening etc so needs to be suitable,

 

 

 

Thanks for all the info.

 

John





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  # 1804441 21-Jun-2017 08:41
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With conventional override brakes on trailers, there's usually adjustments for travel on the coupling / master cylinder adjustment.  I get the feeling many people don't set them up right - so that there's either too much travel and the trailer brakes thump on an off under mild deceleration, or they're set up with not enough travel and end up binding and overheating the brakes, or they've got the wrong sized spring in them for the towed load. 

 

But the biggest problem IMO with people towing trailers is poor weight distribution when loading the trailer, standard recommendation is usually that weight on the drawbar should be 10-15% of towed weight. 


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  # 1804442 21-Jun-2017 08:48
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SATTV:

 

I thought manual would have been better than Auto for towing.

 

 

 

 

MT is probably perfectly fine for light towing etc.  My comment more WRT heavy duty towing, large boats, caravans etc, with typical tow vehicles these days like 4WDs, assorted utes etc,  The manuals usually have dual mass flywheels (DMF) which if subject to mild abuse (slipping clutch a bit to pull boats out of water) will fail and are very expensive to fix.  The makers seem to walk away from warranty - when the DMF fails the clutch needs replacing, the clutch may be covered for "faults", but not wear and tear / abuse. 4WD forums are littered with horror stories about DMF failure on modern 4WDs.


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  # 1804445 21-Jun-2017 09:04
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Fred99:

 

SATTV:

 

I thought manual would have been better than Auto for towing.

 

 

 

 

MT is probably perfectly fine for light towing etc.  My comment more WRT heavy duty towing, large boats, caravans etc, with typical tow vehicles these days like 4WDs, assorted utes etc,  The manuals usually have dual mass flywheels (DMF) which if subject to mild abuse (slipping clutch a bit to pull boats out of water) will fail and are very expensive to fix.  The makers seem to walk away from warranty - when the DMF fails the clutch needs replacing, the clutch may be covered for "faults", but not wear and tear / abuse. 4WD forums are littered with horror stories about DMF failure on modern 4WDs.

 

 

 

 

I have seen a few off roaders blow their clutches up and disintegrate DMF's.

 

A clutch is based off friction, a torque converter is based on the motion of fluid.  The higher the RPM the more pressure the fluid puts down the driveline, Generally wheels will spin before something will slip. (unless its a shot trans, I have also seen a torque converter go POP on an 80 series land cruiser) ($8,000 later)

 

 


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