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  Reply # 1921442 18-Dec-2017 18:59
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Buy a spare wheel and keep it at home. Sure, not as useful as being able to keep it in the car, but it means that if you get a flat on a weekend or public holiday, you might be able to make it home. And then swap it over yourself. Or Uber home to get it, or somone to drop it off for you.

Over the years, I have also gotten slow punctures, that haven't caused any problem getting home. But the next morning, the tyre is completely flat.





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  Reply # 1921456 18-Dec-2017 19:19
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As somebody else has mentioned, The Suzuki Swift does have a spare tire, only the Suzuki Swift sport is without. (and I imagine the 4wd swifts out of japan).

Not having a spare tire is becoming quite common. No BMW comes with a spare tire, and only some of the BMW SUV's have them as options. they have run-flats on some models, and normal tires on others). Spare tires are rare on electric cars, and on sports cars.

This is not such a big deal. Unless you do a heap of course gravel driving, flats in modern tires are rare. Also many modern cars have tire pressure sensors that will indicate a tire leak well before the is flat.

A lot of research in the USA indicates that a relatively small number of drivers know how to change a wheel, and of those who do know, a decent chunk of them would call a roadside assistance service rather there tire at the side of the highway. (Excludeds pick up trucks, and off road type 4x4's)

Auto manufactures are taking advantage of this knowledge to scrap the spare tire, saving $150 odd from the manufacturing cost of the car, and offering bigger boot space, and releasing the performance / eco advantages of 30kg of weight savings.

Big rig trucks rarely carry spare tires anymore (the wheels / tires (typically multiple sizes per truck), combined with equipment to fit them (jacks etc) is expensive an heavy). Every KG of spares you carry is 1 kg less of payload you can sell... It is more cost effective for them to have the driver wait for a tire service, than carrying spares.

 

For your situation I recommend:

 

  • Replace your tires at 3mm tread depth rather than the legal min of 1.5mm. This will massively decrease the odd of a puncture. (also, wet drip starts to drop away below 3mm of tread depth so it is also good for safety and wet performance).
  • Check your fix a flat can new/full, and includes a 12V compressor. (If not I would buy a cheap compressor one and carry it. This allows you to air your tire up to get home without putting the goo in it - something that will likely write of the tire and Tire pressure sensor if any).
  • Check and see if you have flat tire detection (will be in your manual, likely the flat tire symbol will flash on and off each time your start the car). As others have said, can be added aftermarket if it gives you peace of mind. These are required by law in the USA for safety reasons. Basically without them it is really hard to tell if you have an under-inflated rear tire, continuing to drive on it can lead to the sidewall overheating, and blowing out, creating a dangerous handling situation.
  • Take your phone with you when you are out in the car.

The above should provide enough piece of mind. I didn't have any worries when I had the i3 (which has no spare, no runflats, just a compresses / goo kit).

Probably should avoid ultra low profile tires too as they are more prone to road damage.




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  Reply # 1921462 18-Dec-2017 19:27
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Thanks for all the info guys, Geekzoners are such a helpful bunch.

 

Merry Xmas to you all.


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  Reply # 1921504 18-Dec-2017 20:32
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Scott3:

 

  • Replace your tires at 3mm tread depth rather than the legal min of 1.5mm. This will massively decrease the odd of a puncture. (also, wet drip starts to drop away below 3mm of tread depth so it is also good for safety and wet performance).

 

 

 

 

 

Excellent info that I whole heatedly agree with, But further to the tire condition. Always check the inside edges of your tires as poor suspension geometry and or worn suspension will most likely cause toe in or out and can very quickly eat the inside of a tire through the belts even when the outside is showing 4-5mm.

Noticed this on my Fathers Audi S4, He thrashes it and has worn the insides out completely through the belts and never would have know, has 5mm left on the outside and middle. Was planning to go to Auckland form Whangarei and that would have been a sidewall separation.





 


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  Reply # 1921728 19-Dec-2017 09:54
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Can roadside assist help you if you don't have spare - i.e. can they repair a puncture?

 

When I used to do a lot of 4WD stuff well off the beaten track driving around Otago (1990s), we used to carry a little spray bottle of soapy water, a plug patch kit and a good 12v compressor.  Only ever made repairs in the tread area, never-ever in the sidewall.  Went to a tyre shop when back in town for proper repair.  Never had any issues.

 

I don't know whether plugs are actually road legal

 

I've made sure all our kids can change a tyre.  Mobile coverage is patchy in the rural areas of the South island, and generally the more remote you are, the worse the road is and the more chance of punctures.  If you can call for roadside assist you are vulnerable until it arrives.  Better to change the tyre yourself and keep moving.

 

 





Mike

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  Reply # 1922468 20-Dec-2017 12:09
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MikeAqua:

 

I don't know whether plugs are actually road legal

 

 

Only if installed from the inside (mushroom style).


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  Reply # 1922566 20-Dec-2017 14:11
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cadman:

 

MikeAqua:

 

I don't know whether plugs are actually road legal

 

 

Only if installed from the inside (mushroom style).

 

 

Well that won't hep for roadside repair then. Interesting as we drove 100s of km on them at 80km/h on tarmac e.g. Blue Mountains to Dunedin in our old Landie.   But that was the mid-1990s. 

 

If you are in the back blocks you could probably still fit one and drive slowly to the nearest repair place.





Mike

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