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929 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  #2010384 9-May-2018 02:18
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Ignoring all the boring people who have a problem with Radar detectors 

 

I have not noticed this on my Uniden R1 but as I understand it laser is a strong point for the V1s and a weaker point for the new unidens.


gzt

11550 posts

Uber Geek

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  #2010390 9-May-2018 06:14
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Now you all finished with the sensible discussion. I'd like to know which one of you loozers has a problem with my fricken lasers:


 
 
 
 


281 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  #2010453 9-May-2018 09:26
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Yeah. I hate having to swerve to avoid the sharks.

199 posts

Master Geek


  #2012721 9-May-2018 14:38
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nas:

 

Bike cops still use laser unfortunately.

 

 

As do patrol cars in higher flow areas, such as Auckland motorways, as it's selective, unlike microwave.


10613 posts

Uber Geek


  #2015483 14-May-2018 08:03
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https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12049540

 

The end of the radar/laser detector is nigh.


3315 posts

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  #2015486 14-May-2018 08:13
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Fred99:

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12049540

 

The end of the radar/laser detector is nigh.

 

 

 

 

I seriously doubt that.  P2P will only work on selected sections of highway that have no exit/entry points.  To justify usage there will need to at least be an impression that these are deployed in areas that have a high crash risk.   I am thinking expressways and motorways where laser/radar use by mobile patrols are not easily done without creating a hazard themselves.    

 

If overseas experience is any indication single target mobile speed detection systems will always be deployed by enforcement agencies. 

 

Speed is probably more than ever a priority for this particular government.  It's been proven time and time again that lower speeds results in reduced death and serious injury (not I didn't say cause crashes), so they won't be taking their foot off the accelerator (no pun intended) on this topic, quite the opposite I expect.  More detection, lower speed limits on high risk roads, and so on. 

 

      





Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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  #2015492 14-May-2018 08:32
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Apparently the P2P is getting results? How far apart do the cameras need to be? 100m?  20m? Seems ok to me to place them near enough to anywhere

 

As far as the go to revenue gathering is concerned, they should look at daily or weekly DQ if the populous think that. Based on speed excess


 
 
 
 


10613 posts

Uber Geek


  #2015495 14-May-2018 08:46
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scuwp:

 

Fred99:

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12049540

 

The end of the radar/laser detector is nigh.

 

 

 

 

I seriously doubt that.  P2P will only work on selected sections of highway that have no exit/entry points.  To justify usage there will need to at least be an impression that these are deployed in areas that have a high crash risk.   I am thinking expressways and motorways where laser/radar use by mobile patrols are not easily done without creating a hazard themselves.    

 

 

Even with the tech they have now, the cameras don't need to be so far apart - only a couple of hundred metres - so they could be used almost anywhere.  They are apparently set up and used for temporary road works speed detection in the UK.  

 

A valid objection may be surrounding privacy issues and NPR, but I suspect the horse may have bolted there.  NPR systems seem to be in car parking buildings, in places like my local council recycling centre etc, I don't recall any complaints about a privacy issue there.


1939 posts

Uber Geek


  #2015515 14-May-2018 09:08
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scuwp:

 

Fred99:

 

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12049540

 

The end of the radar/laser detector is nigh.

 

 

I seriously doubt that.  P2P will only work on selected sections of highway that have no exit/entry points.  To justify usage there will need to at least be an impression that these are deployed in areas that have a high crash risk.   I am thinking expressways and motorways where laser/radar use by mobile patrols are not easily done without creating a hazard themselves.    

 

 

Why? If there's an exit/entry point between the two cameras then that might result in a photo of a car entering but not exiting the area (or exiting but not having entered). These photos will just be ignored.

 

Or am I missing something else?


4092 posts

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  #2015519 14-May-2018 09:20
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P2P in Queensland are often put on the entry/exits of a spaghetti section with the opposing end some distance away. So all routes are essentially covered.

 

Some of the runs 30kms between.


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  #2015537 14-May-2018 09:49
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Oblivian:

P2P in Queensland are often put on the entry/exits of a spaghetti section with the opposing end some distance away. So all routes are essentially covered.


Some of the runs 30kms between.



The examples I have seen or looked at over the years are several kilometres apart.




Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



10613 posts

Uber Geek


  #2015552 14-May-2018 10:06
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scuwp:
Oblivian:

 

P2P in Queensland are often put on the entry/exits of a spaghetti section with the opposing end some distance away. So all routes are essentially covered.

 

 

 

Some of the runs 30kms between.

 



The examples I have seen or looked at over the years are several kilometres apart.

 

They don't have to be though.

 

There are maps of where the systems are in place in the UK from which if entry and exit points at each end of the monitored section were the places where the cameras were located, then there would only be a few dozen cameras.  

 

 

A four year evaluation of average speed camera effectiveness commissioned by the UK Department for Transport found a 70% reduction in speeding at fixed sites, a fall of 6% in average speeds and a 42% reduction in people killed and seriously injured.

 

PIPS Technology has also installed 4,000 ALPR cameras for a travel-time system, covering over 1,000 lanes of England’s motorways and road network for the Highways Agency’s Traffic Control Centre and continuously monitoring the state of the country’s core routes and feeding that information to the NTCC.

 


4092 posts

Uber Geek


  #2015568 14-May-2018 10:13
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scuwp:
Oblivian:

 

P2P in Queensland are often put on the entry/exits of a spaghetti section with the opposing end some distance away. So all routes are essentially covered.

 

Some of the runs 30kms between.

 



The examples I have seen or looked at over the years are several kilometres apart.

 

You could easily forget in a 30k gap :)

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-01/racq-welcomes-new-speed-cameras-on-deadliest-road/7679256 




Devastation by stupidity
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  #2015583 14-May-2018 10:33
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I would imagine that the locations of such cameras would quickly become known and broadcast and some people would make a sport out of speeding between them, then stopping for a roadside cup of coffee. 

 

 





I don't think there is ever a bad time to talk about how absurd war is, how old men make decisions and young people die. - George Clooney
 


10613 posts

Uber Geek


  #2015671 14-May-2018 12:31
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Rikkitic:

 

I would imagine that the locations of such cameras would quickly become known and broadcast and some people would make a sport out of speeding between them, then stopping for a roadside cup of coffee. 

 

 

 

 

You have such low expectation for human nature.

 

I'd be more concerned that owners of cars that can travel at light-speed - like Subarus with pop-off valves and huge aftermarket tachometers - will cause divide by zero exceptions in the computers - and the whole system will shut down.


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