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  #2008627 6-May-2018 10:54
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New brake pads should be used with new rotors

John

Sidestep
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  #2008646 6-May-2018 11:41
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Batman:

 

thanks guys. Yup added pit stop to the avoid list too. man that's a lot of places I avoid!

 

 

I think you're being unfair to Pit Stop. They're positioned in the market as a low cost installer of OEM-equivalent brake components.

 

At it's simplest your brakes convert the kinetic energy (speed) of your car into heat, by pressing a fixed pad (brake pad) against a rotating plate (your rotor).

 

Material selections for both the pad and rotor balance component 'cost' - ease of supply & manufacture, against weight, longevity and even (with increasing use of spoked wheels) visual appeal.
Many mechanically suitable materials, such as asbestos, that have health risks must be avoided.
Within the pressure range of your car's factory braking system, pads (cheaper & more easily replaced) must be matched to abrade at a faster rate than the rotors, which must be able to withstand mechanical stress while conducting heat to the atmosphere.

 

Your local Pit Stop has taken all these complex calculation out of your hands and reduced your choices to a simple 'low', 'medium' or high' end sets, all likely with rotors made of grey (high carbon & silicon) cast iron.

 

Within your 'cast irons' are many different 'grades' - often given an SAE or DIN rating such as G-10, G-20 or G-40 which describe the amount of Carbon, Silicon, Manganese, Phosphorus, Sulphur, Nickel, Moly, Chromium & Copper in the mix, and, in turn the mechanical properties (and resistance to corrosion).

Most low price rotors are cast in asian countries, of say G-25 Iron -which is perfectly serviceable, but with a tendency to 'rust'

There are many other materials you could choose - ranging through the stainless caliper & pistons, 'dacromet' alloy rotors & ceramic pad sets I have on my boat trailer (for corrosion resistance) to the Carbon fibre composites used in high end motorsport/supercars (for extreme performance use) but there's an almost exponential price increase for incremental gain.

 

If you are worried about the look of your rotors, spend more money and buy 'factory' OEM replacements. They'll be more expensive but likely made from a slightly different grade of iron (with slightly improved corrosion resistance) and will work exactly the same - but look a bit prettier.

 

I'm sure your local Toyota Dealer 'does' do brakes.


 
 
 
 


richms
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  #2008647 6-May-2018 11:42
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Or take the wheel off, brush off the loose rust from those parts and put some rust converter on it to make it go black and presentable looking. Not where the pad touches tho.





Richard rich.ms

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  #2008660 6-May-2018 12:29
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From what I see in that photo you have nothing to be concerned or unhappy about. Your old disks probably had a similar rusty appearance around the hub when they were new. It's my guess with a bit if time as they age and oxidise some more and gather brake dust and dirt they'll look just like your old ones did in that respect.

 

As for the surface of the disks they look perfectly OK as well. I don't see any pitting, just discolouration which is normal. The discolouration can differ depending in the composition of the pads.

 

The front disc hubs will tend to dirty up more quickly as the front brakes tend to work harder and generate more dust. You'll notice the front wheels on cars are usually much dirtier than the rear wheels.

 

 





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  #2008669 6-May-2018 12:37
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We have a Nissan that's about a year old. I asked the same question. It's apparently normal to get rusty. Even the disks get rusty, but it wears off when you use the brakes.

 

My older Corolla doesn't seem to do the same.


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  #2008674 6-May-2018 12:48
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Technofreak:

 

 

 

As for the surface of the disks they look perfectly OK as well. I don't see any pitting, just discolouration which is normal. The discolouration can differ depending in the composition of the pads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maybe I've got an advantage as I'm viewing on a calibrated IPS monitor, but I see pitting and I'm highly confident that I'm not seeing things.

 

Perhaps this will make it more clear(adjusted contrast etc):

 

 

Yes - they'll probably work fine, though it probably means that pads will wear more quickly, but these don't look like any "new" disks I've ever seen.


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  #2008677 6-May-2018 12:56
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Fred99:

 

Technofreak:

 

As for the surface of the disks they look perfectly OK as well. I don't see any pitting, just discolouration which is normal. The discolouration can differ depending in the composition of the pads.

 

 

Maybe I've got an advantage as I'm viewing on a calibrated IPS monitor, but I see pitting and I'm highly confident that I'm not seeing things.

 

Perhaps this will make it more clear(adjusted contrast etc):

 

Yes - they'll probably work fine, though it probably means that pads will wear more quickly, but these don't look like any "new" disks I've ever seen.

 

 

You're right there's some pitting and scoring. I'm guessing since installation OP has parked in a damp and/or salty location?

 

Edit-removed pic from quote


 
 
 
 


FireEngine
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  #2008729 6-May-2018 13:53
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Jase2985:

 

lol its not essential to do this as using new pads on new rotors can have a higher chance of glazing the discs causing under performance of the brake system.

 

you should use old pads on new rotors to help prevent this then change the pads after 500-1000km

 

saying they should not be in business is ridiculous

 

 

Old pads will be worn to the old rotor pattern, that means less pad in contact with the new rotors. That means less brake force and more heat at the reduced contact points...and heat is what causes glazing. So bad advice. OP doesn't have some high-spec racing (genuine racing, not fast-boy "racing"), system where the pads may glaze if not used hard as intended.

 

And as pointed out already, new cars manage just fine on new pads and rotors from the get-go, using old pads on new rotors just further shortens the life of both and gives an extended period before full braking is possible.

 

I too am amazed at the state of those rear rotors, I wouldn't expect to see that level of scoring and pitting on anything under a year or two old.





Regards FireEngine


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  #2008754 6-May-2018 15:25
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Fred99:

 

Not sure that it would apply to your particular model of car, but if a common and relatively ordinary one then aftermarket disks are perhaps $100/ pair from Supercheap, BNT etc, reasonable quality pads perhaps $50 for a set, so all up costs about $300.  There are some possible complications if DIY change the rear pads/disks, the workshop should have the tools and know what they're doing.  I'd be surprised if labour would have been two hours to do the whole job - front and rears.

 

I think you've probably been ripped off.

 

It's possible that if the vehicle is a "performance" model, and has drilled rotors, larger non-standard rotors, special compound performance pads etc specified as OEM, then parts cost could be high, sometimes extremely high, but for an ordinary car - then nope.  Parts should be very cheap, easy to obtain, and it's a simple job to change them over.

 

 

It's a van, did not check supercheap auto rotor prices. I think it was something like $250 a pair of rotors. There or thereabouts.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


Batman

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  #2008756 6-May-2018 15:26
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Fred99:

 

Batman:

 

Toyota dealer - you need new pads and new rotors within next year. We don't do it here, send it to brake shop, will cost $1000.

 

 

"Dealer" as in car salesman type outfit - or OEM dealership with workshop?

 

If the latter, then I think it's staggering and unbelievable news that an OEM workshop would say they no longer carry out basic servicing such as replacing disks / pads.

 

 

It's a dealership with workshop.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


Batman

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  #2008758 6-May-2018 15:28
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Technofreak:

 

From what I see in that photo you have nothing to be concerned or unhappy about. Your old disks probably had a similar rusty appearance around the hub when they were new. It's my guess with a bit if time as they age and oxidise some more and gather brake dust and dirt they'll look just like your old ones did in that respect.

 

As for the surface of the disks they look perfectly OK as well. I don't see any pitting, just discolouration which is normal. The discolouration can differ depending in the composition of the pads.

 

The front disc hubs will tend to dirty up more quickly as the front brakes tend to work harder and generate more dust. You'll notice the front wheels on cars are usually much dirtier than the rear wheels.

 

 

 

 

Ok thanks, so rust first, then black. Ok good to know ... let's see if it turns black or disintegrate into dust :)





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


Batman

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  #2008762 6-May-2018 15:31
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Sidestep:

 

Batman:

 

thanks guys. Yup added pit stop to the avoid list too. man that's a lot of places I avoid!

 

 

I think you're being unfair to Pit Stop. They're positioned in the market as a low cost installer of OEM-equivalent brake components.

 

At it's simplest your brakes convert the kinetic energy (speed) of your car into heat, by pressing a fixed pad (brake pad) against a rotating plate (your rotor).

 

Material selections for both the pad and rotor balance component 'cost' - ease of supply & manufacture, against weight, longevity and even (with increasing use of spoked wheels) visual appeal.
Many mechanically suitable materials, such as asbestos, that have health risks must be avoided.
Within the pressure range of your car's factory braking system, pads (cheaper & more easily replaced) must be matched to abrade at a faster rate than the rotors, which must be able to withstand mechanical stress while conducting heat to the atmosphere.

 

Your local Pit Stop has taken all these complex calculation out of your hands and reduced your choices to a simple 'low', 'medium' or high' end sets, all likely with rotors made of grey (high carbon & silicon) cast iron.

 

Within your 'cast irons' are many different 'grades' - often given an SAE or DIN rating such as G-10, G-20 or G-40 which describe the amount of Carbon, Silicon, Manganese, Phosphorus, Sulphur, Nickel, Moly, Chromium & Copper in the mix, and, in turn the mechanical properties (and resistance to corrosion).

Most low price rotors are cast in asian countries, of say G-25 Iron -which is perfectly serviceable, but with a tendency to 'rust'

There are many other materials you could choose - ranging through the stainless caliper & pistons, 'dacromet' alloy rotors & ceramic pad sets I have on my boat trailer (for corrosion resistance) to the Carbon fibre composites used in high end motorsport/supercars (for extreme performance use) but there's an almost exponential price increase for incremental gain.

 

If you are worried about the look of your rotors, spend more money and buy 'factory' OEM replacements. They'll be more expensive but likely made from a slightly different grade of iron (with slightly improved corrosion resistance) and will work exactly the same - but look a bit prettier.

 

I'm sure your local Toyota Dealer 'does' do brakes.

 

 

Ok thanks. I won't hold any grudges against Pit Stop.

 

Dealer not only doesn't do brakes, don't do exhaust either.





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


plod
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  #2008763 6-May-2018 15:40
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My bike failed a warrant at motor mart in Lower Hutt for front disc. Got them to replace it. After about two week I heard a strange noise coming from front brakes. The pads were down to the metal. Went in and complained. Told me the tech that had done the job is no longer there. Didn’t make a fuss. But just tell everyone I know about there quality service their provide

Fred99
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  #2008904 6-May-2018 20:12
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Batman:

 

It's a van.

 

 

Obviously a high performance racing van with those mags - and rear disks.


gzt

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  #2008908 6-May-2018 20:31
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Batman:

Fred99:


Not sure that it would apply to your particular model of car, but if a common and relatively ordinary one then aftermarket disks are perhaps $100/ pair from Supercheap, BNT etc, reasonable quality pads perhaps $50 for a set, so all up costs about $300.  There are some possible complications if DIY change the rear pads/disks, the workshop should have the tools and know what they're doing.  I'd be surprised if labour would have been two hours to do the whole job - front and rears.


I think you've probably been ripped off.


It's possible that if the vehicle is a "performance" model, and has drilled rotors, larger non-standard rotors, special compound performance pads etc specified as OEM, then parts cost could be high, sometimes extremely high, but for an ordinary car - then nope.  Parts should be very cheap, easy to obtain, and it's a simple job to change them over.



It's a van, did not check supercheap auto rotor prices. I think it was something like $250 a pair of rotors. There or thereabouts.


Kind of off topic personally I'd look at an established trade supplier like partmaster or bnt. Partmaster is showing estima rear rotors for $72+ over the counter. No idea if that's correct for the model year. I'm guessing estima from previous threads. Sometimes imo you are better off with a local actual mechanic.

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