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Topic # 239839 7-Aug-2018 12:29
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I always try to look after things, that they are maintained and the right fluids are used.  We've gotten 20yrs out of our cars since the manufacture date.  

 

 

 

In my earlier years and what I know with others, servicing wasn't such a high regard.  We never did sign up for a annual servicing appointment.  We had a long relationships with a few local (independent) mechanics 10 or more years. One relocated, one passed away, one we are using now is prob near retirement.  Not one mechanic mentioned about a reminder of the timing belt or any fluid flushes.  We had the mechanic regularly change our engine oil for us though. We did the other usual as required like brake pads, bulbs, CV joints, drive belts, spark plugs.  

 

 

 

Even the air filter wasn't change, one was a Ford Telstar (1992 model?) replaced in 2008, at the time the alternator was failing and we were told it is getting too expensive to repair and we should get a replacement car which we did.  There could had been other issues the mechanic knew about. Maybe it is the view that the average motorist pick up a relatively cheap 8-10yr old car, then use it for another 10yrs , instead of the servicing and repair cost by that time it's better to juts replace it?  Again now, they have a Toyota Camry 1998 and still going but again the only stuff that is done is the WOF, oil changes / filters, sparks as required and drive belts, a radiator fix and a fuel pump - yep no fluid flushes at all.  What are your views and is this a view some mechanics express?  

 

 

 

:) 


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  Reply # 2069247 7-Aug-2018 12:43
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Another day, another car servicing thread from Ray.

 

Some people maintain their cars, some don't, some can but choose not to due to the car being so old.

 

Personally, I only worry about oils and filters.








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  Reply # 2069250 7-Aug-2018 12:52
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used to do basic maintenance on my own when i was at the uni.

 

since leaving uni, always has new cars, therefore serviced at dealership, and too lazy to get my hand dirty.

 

personally, i don't put much thought in it and just keep an eye on that piece of service sticker on my windscreen...

 

 






 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2069251 7-Aug-2018 12:52
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The manufacturer's servicing schedule is a really good guide...

Most vehicles would have oil/filter every 10,000, inspect air filter at the same time and replace if necessary. I'd generally do an air filter every second to third service but it very much depends on operating conditions. 

Spark plugs/fuel filter every 50,000? 

 

Inspect coolant every service, most recommend a flush/replace every 40,000km I think. 

 

Timing belt/tensioner/water pump etc every 100,000 or 150,000 depending on manufacturer's recommendations, and any other 'consumables' as they are required...that's the basics anyway. 


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  Reply # 2069256 7-Aug-2018 12:58
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I do/have done: -

 

When I fill up - tyres, fluid levels (brake, coolant, steering);

 

10,000km change on engine oil, oil filter, air filter, and fuel filter;

 

10,00km check of brake fluid (test strips), pads, rotors, calipers, wheel bearings, boots, steering components;

 

20,000km check of AT oil  and change/flush as required;

 

50,000km change oil in diffs;

 

90,000km mechanic checks timing chain and guides.

 

Every autumn I check coolant (test strips) and change if required - the only thing I do by calendar.

 

 

 

 





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  Reply # 2069294 7-Aug-2018 14:04
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Step one : Check servicing schedule for recommended intervals.

 

Step two : Drop off at dealership at recommended interval to perform tasks specified in the servicing schedule.

 

Does it really need to be more complicated than that?


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  Reply # 2069550 7-Aug-2018 21:29
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It depends on the car.

 

 

 

I would not touch a modern era Land Rover that had not had all the scheduled services and fluid changes, for example. You'd be asking for trouble and trouble with those cars is usually a significant expense! I am sure many other modern cars fall the other way with more simple transmissions, long life spark plugs and synthetic oils.

 

 

 

The old maxim - look after your car and it will look after you - has more than a grain of truth in it.






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  Reply # 2069665 8-Aug-2018 09:12
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alasta:

 

Step one : Check servicing schedule for recommended intervals.

 

Step two : Drop off at dealership at recommended interval to perform tasks specified in the servicing schedule.

 

Does it really need to be more complicated than that?

 

 

Depends how much money you want to spend and how much time/skill/gear you have.

 

I get a kick out of doing the more basic routine servicing on my Pajero, it also saves me a lot of money compared to getting it done professionally.

 

 





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  Reply # 2069685 8-Aug-2018 09:59
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Back in the late 1970s when I was driving my legendary Austin 1300 (I had more adventures in that than the Minis in both Goodbye Pork Pie movies) I could open the bonnet and look after most things myself. These days it's a lot more complicated under the hood - I'll do basic stuff like petrol, oli and othe requiredd fluids, and tyre pressure, and leave the rest to the professionals. As my last three cars have been purchased new I get a service plan included and drop it off whenever it's due to have anything done. 


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  Reply # 2069689 8-Aug-2018 10:15
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gbwelly:

 

Another day, another car servicing thread from Ray.

 

Some people maintain their cars, some don't, some can but choose not to due to the car being so old.

 

Personally, I only worry about oils and filters.

 

 

On modern cars , I've been told the engine flush is very important. 

 

But, yes, as a minimum oil and filters. 




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  Reply # 2069691 8-Aug-2018 10:20
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andrew027:

 

As my last three cars have been purchased new I get a service plan included and drop it off whenever it's due to have anything done. 

 

 

 

 

With the opportunity cost of what I could do with the funds instead, could never justify new cars.  The insurance might be more also.  Same with a laptop actually, like driving to the supermarket, my laptop is just used for surfing the web and watching YouTube (really) in the warm lounge a second hand business laptop (with an SSD) does the same thing. 


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  Reply # 2069708 8-Aug-2018 10:51
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Changing the coolant is just as important as changing the oil on modern cars. And also far cheaper than replacing head gaskets or entire engines.





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  Reply # 2069751 8-Aug-2018 12:02
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I've never brought a brand new car, but I've always used the service department of the brand, and had services once a year.

 

I did once use a AA service centre, as they had a deal for service and WOF, which basically was a free WOF with the sevice. Was just OK.

 

My last service was with the local Holden dealer in Wellington in March. That service was approximately 18 months after the last service, and no drama's arose due to the time between services. During the service and checks they noted and told me the rear pads were getting low, not a the point to be changed, would to expect to have to change them during the year, and just the other week, they're were done.

 

And thumbs up to them, I rang on the Thursday morning hoping to have the car booked in for the Monday morning as that was the only day my wife didn't need the car (only a 1 car family), and even though they were fully booked and initially I was told the earliest slot would be the following Friday, they still managed to get the car in for the Monday.

 

And from memory, I think I got a small discount on the labour too.

 

The last time I pushed brake pads service out from hearing the first squeak, it resulted in front pads and discs being replaced.

 

 

 

 


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