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# 261352 22-Nov-2019 09:30
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Hi I was checking out dinghies that do not require registration /licence /etc.

Which build material is best? I've seen aluminium, inflatable, any suggestions or recommendations?

Thanks




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  # 2359219 22-Nov-2019 10:17
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What do you want to use it for, and how big?

 

I've got an inflatable dinghy (now on its last legs) that lasted 20 years, but made by Zodiac out of top quality fabric.  You can buy cheap chinese made inflatables that will fall apart/rot in the sun quickly, roto-moulded plastic dinghies, inflatables with flat floors, with rigid inflatable floors, with solid floors with inflatable keels, or with rigid aluminium or fibreglass floors.  You could DIY a dinghy out of ply, or make something as a work of art out of kauri.  Or then there's the fairly standard aluminium "tinny".

 

Everything with boating is a bucket full of compromises, so to find the best compromise you first need to define your needs and ask the right question.




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  # 2359260 22-Nov-2019 11:34
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For the occasional outing on a calm fresh water lake. Most likely 2-3/4(? 5) people in it. Most likely oars powered. Will be stored under covers.




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  # 2359288 22-Nov-2019 12:13
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Most inflatable dinghies are horrible to row due to hull shape, the rowlocks are attached to the tubes and wobble and the tubes get in the way, and the seats never seem to be in the right position.  They are great (usually) to get on and off, more stable so clumsy people far less likely to tip everyone in the drink when getting on or off.

 

A tinny should do the trick, they're light-weight/easy to carry but they're ugly and noisy.  Rotomoulded plastic (ie Macboats) are basically zero maintenance, but a 4 seater is heavy (138kg) http://macboats.co.nz/mac-370-clinker-cutter/ (I quite like that one - except for the weight - you'd really need to get or make a wheeled dolly to get it to/from the lakefront).  Ply is probably the lightest option apart from aluminium or inflatable, but they need maintenance / tlc.

 

I also like small outboards - 4 stroke - but not with air-cooling (some small hondas - very noisy) and not without a gear lever to put them in neutral.  I've got a small Suzuki 2.5, pretty cheaply made, but pushes an inflatable with 4 people on it fine without being very loud / revving hard, on a decently shaped dinghy on flat water it'd be even better, and on fresh water you don't need to bother with flushing it after use, it uses very little fuel and any left over can be used in a car, probably weighs about 12kg so easy to lug around.  I just noticed the page for the macboat has a photo with the same outboard fitted.

 

 


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  # 2359293 22-Nov-2019 12:31
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I've always found transporting any more than 1 adult or 2 children (+ oarsman) over distance in a row boat requires serious arm power & refined technique. Best get some training in - on the job is no place to learn.

If you're prepared to invest in heritage-quality art in the form of a dinghy, the absolute master is Robert Brooke MNZM. His traditional clinker dinghys are superb (as are all his boats).




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  # 2361580 27-Nov-2019 15:00
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If you want a simple dingy to row on a calm lake, I would get a set of plans and build one out of plywood.

 

Lots of free plans on the internet.





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  # 2362150 28-Nov-2019 10:21
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For 5 people you need about 3.5m. Something that size you need a trailer to move it. If you want a top quality row boat then a Putney made by Laver Marine would do. You can often find one or two on Trade Me. They're GRP which is maintenance-free but a bit heavy. While that makes it harder to move on land it probably improves the rowing qualities.





McLean




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  # 2362285 28-Nov-2019 12:41
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Thanks for all the tips




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  # 2364076 1-Dec-2019 15:55
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i negotiated an 80s fibreglass hull 8.5ft that has been recently repainted. unable to view in person though that can be arranged with a small bit of hassle but doable.

 

says can be rowed, sailed or powered, though i don't see any rings to put oars through in the pics.

 

any gotchas from something like this?





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  # 2364217 1-Dec-2019 20:26
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Those "rings to put oars through" are called rowlocks (pron rollicks).

Although boating can bring some of the best days of your life, it's also fraught with danger at every moment. In minutes a perfect afternoon can become a life-threatening situation.

I'm thinking of a glorious afternoon I had skiing off Motuihe island, perfect weather followed by a nightmare journey back to Okahu Bay against the tide & facing a sudden storm. That boat had 200hp to get out of trouble with plus careful, experienced owners.

Buying a boat sight unseen when you're not comfortably conversant with the components of a boat sets off alarm bells for me. What could possibly go wrong? The answer is not trivial.

Straight up, on the water by yourself is no place to learn. MaritimeNZ offers courses (incl free online learning), as do most local Yacht & Powerboat clubs. You'll gain invaluable experience & substantial confidence. & you'll be able to make a far more balanced decision on which hull is right for you.

I'm not preaching, I'm just looking out for you.




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  # 2364224 1-Dec-2019 20:40
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Probably a Seabird 2.6 - nice little boats although that is too small to be very useful.  The 3.2 is a good compromise, the 3.8 more capable but quite a lot heavier for launching etc




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  # 2365120 2-Dec-2019 19:43
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shk292:

 

Probably a Seabird 2.6 - nice little boats although that is too small to be very useful.  The 3.2 is a good compromise, the 3.8 more capable but quite a lot heavier for launching etc

 

 

thanks. i understand your concern. i don't plan to take it to the middle of the lake, just around the lagoon.





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  # 2365183 2-Dec-2019 21:51
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Should be fine for that, just don't overload. The good thing is those boats (seabirds) are well built and seem to last forever

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