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BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 1218829 21-Jan-2015 09:20
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At the end of the day they have to pick their battles. Developing and testing for every single device is costly in time, human resources and devices.

A lot easier to go for the big ones - the best sellers in each category and after that test or receive information that yes, it works on this or that.




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  Reply # 1218834 21-Jan-2015 09:23
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Within the past four and half months since launch, we've expanded pretty aggressively across devices (starting with the major ones) and we're not at all done. Every platform takes money, time and effort to move through commercial agreements, design, visuals, development, testing, certification and launch. Not making excuses, just trying to set expectations about how fast you can go.




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  Reply # 1218836 21-Jan-2015 09:26
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Sure, the device selection could be better, and hopefully they are working on Chromecast support and lobbying Apple for an invite to develop for the AppleTV.
I understand peoples hate around Samsung exclusivity, but if Samsung are paying for the development of the Smart TV and Android Apps, their price is exclusivity (I am assuming here - don't know if that is really the case). LG, Sony, Panasonic could have got in first?
I would not expect them to put out a Roku App, or an Amazon FireTV app - they aren't officially available in NZ.

As for content, what they have is a good start and you have to start somewhere. I'll take a bet that Netflix will have a pretty crappy range when they launch in NZ (compared to their US, and even UK range).

Thanks Spark and Lightbox. Your offer is appreciated, for whatever reason you are offering it :)

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  Reply # 1218854 21-Jan-2015 09:43
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Lightbox: Within the past four and half months since launch, we've expanded pretty aggressively across devices (starting with the major ones) and we're not at all done. Every platform takes money, time and effort to move through commercial agreements, design, visuals, development, testing, certification and launch. Not making excuses, just trying to set expectations about how fast you can go.


Just out of interest (I have no idea) how would the cost of investing in your own hardware (set top box) compare with what you have outlined above.





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  Reply # 1218865 21-Jan-2015 09:49
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Just out of interest (I have no idea) how would the cost of investing in your own hardware (set top box) compare with what you have outlined above.


It's a good question (that gets asked a lot internally as well). On top of distribution, warranties and logistics (which isn't trivial), you need pretty big scale before it makes sense. So the real question is whether you can get consumers to adopt your device in high enough numbers to build the volume needed or if people prefer to use existing devices.




Lightbox - we are online TV.

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  Reply # 1218879 21-Jan-2015 10:16
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Lightbox:


Just out of interest (I have no idea) how would the cost of investing in your own hardware (set top box) compare with what you have outlined above.


It's a good question (that gets asked a lot internally as well). On top of distribution, warranties and logistics (which isn't trivial), you need pretty big scale before it makes sense. So the real question is whether you can get consumers to adopt your device in high enough numbers to build the volume needed or if people prefer to use existing devices.


And how many HDMI connections would a TV/HT need to cater for a new STB for each new service as well as the ones we have now?



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  Reply # 1218888 21-Jan-2015 10:24
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Lightbox:


Just out of interest (I have no idea) how would the cost of investing in your own hardware (set top box) compare with what you have outlined above.


It's a good question (that gets asked a lot internally as well). On top of distribution, warranties and logistics (which isn't trivial), you need pretty big scale before it makes sense. So the real question is whether you can get consumers to adopt your device in high enough numbers to build the volume needed or if people prefer to use existing devices.


you've only got to look at Netflix's success overseas to see that people much prefer using what they already have. (I know I do - my wife already moans at me for having too many devices connected to the TV. I don't want another one)



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  Reply # 1218904 21-Jan-2015 10:38
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PoHq:
Lightbox: Within the past four and half months since launch, we've expanded pretty aggressively across devices (starting with the major ones) and we're not at all done. Every platform takes money, time and effort to move through commercial agreements, design, visuals, development, testing, certification and launch. Not making excuses, just trying to set expectations about how fast you can go.


Just out of interest (I have no idea) how would the cost of investing in your own hardware (set top box) compare with what you have outlined above.


It would be a lot cheaper to make sure Chromecast support is solid, then give the option of buying a Chromecast when you sign up. $50-odd bucks and there's your box. Of course, the down-side is you're supplying a unit that also works with all your competitors services.

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  Reply # 1218913 21-Jan-2015 10:57
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BlueShift:
PoHq:
Lightbox: Within the past four and half months since launch, we've expanded pretty aggressively across devices (starting with the major ones) and we're not at all done. Every platform takes money, time and effort to move through commercial agreements, design, visuals, development, testing, certification and launch. Not making excuses, just trying to set expectations about how fast you can go.


Just out of interest (I have no idea) how would the cost of investing in your own hardware (set top box) compare with what you have outlined above.


It would be a lot cheaper to make sure Chromecast support is solid, then give the option of buying a Chromecast when you sign up. $50-odd bucks and there's your box. Of course, the down-side is you're supplying a unit that also works with all your competitors services.


If I understand correctly tablet support is still only IOS and Samsung Android devices? So even if Chromecast support is available, users are still stuck with having to have either an IOS device (I don't) or a Samsung tablet (don't either). Presumably you could cast from a PC but that is hardly convenient.






System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


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  Reply # 1219385 21-Jan-2015 18:51
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tdgeek:

I think of it this way. It requires a set top box. There are a few solid choices, but a $100 Samsung DVD/BR player is there for a cheap purchase where you can merely use it as an STB, which is the easiest and nice way to use Lightbox,vis a TV or "permanently plugged into the TV" smart app device.

Again, not pushing Lightbox as I work at Spark, but the negativeness over devices that some here have as they don't have any supported devices is easily and cheaply overcome. 


I understand what you are saying, but:

1.  I already have BR players on my TVs. I'm not looking to replace them. Even if I was, I wouldn't contemplate a Samsung as a replacement option, as this would mean a significant loss of functionality. I have a number of out-of-zone imported films, and plan to buy more, so all my BR players are zone selectable (for BR as well as DVD) so that I can order and play them with confidence. My understanding is that Samsungs are region-locked for both BR and DVD, and there is no code to remove this - if even if a player exploded tomorrow, and I had to purchase a replacement, it wouldn't be replaced by a Samsung.

2.  Installing a Samsung BR player alongside my existing infrastructure isn't a starter. Firstly, I don't want to spend the money on redundant hardware just to try Lightbox. Secondly, even if I did, I have no free HDMI inputs left on any TV.

3.  I have perfectly good media players installed in all rooms that work just fine with the competition (ie US Netflix, and presumably NZ Netflix soon as well) if I want a streaming service. Which makes an upgrade just to try lightbox even less compelling.

I wouldn't characterise it as "negativeness" so much as pointing out that a number of people, including myself, need you to add device compatibility in order for us to be interested. That's largely your problem if you want us as customers, not ours. I'm actually positive insofar as I'm delighted to see new entrants shaking up the incumbents and wish you success. It's just that without device compatibility, your service (and free trial) isn't attractive to me.

Come back with an app for WD Lives, or Android media players, and I'm in.

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  Reply # 1219435 21-Jan-2015 20:12

@lightbox, any chance of some star trek series or original Dr who (Tom Baker is amazing)?

Also my 91 year old grandmother would not mind some one foot in the grave or hyacinth bucket!

Thanks

Dunc

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  Reply # 1219442 21-Jan-2015 20:18
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JimmyH:
tdgeek:

I think of it this way. It requires a set top box. There are a few solid choices, but a $100 Samsung DVD/BR player is there for a cheap purchase where you can merely use it as an STB, which is the easiest and nice way to use Lightbox,vis a TV or "permanently plugged into the TV" smart app device.

Again, not pushing Lightbox as I work at Spark, but the negativeness over devices that some here have as they don't have any supported devices is easily and cheaply overcome. 


I understand what you are saying, but:

1.  I already have BR players on my TVs. I'm not looking to replace them. Even if I was, I wouldn't contemplate a Samsung as a replacement option, as this would mean a significant loss of functionality. I have a number of out-of-zone imported films, and plan to buy more, so all my BR players are zone selectable (for BR as well as DVD) so that I can order and play them with confidence. My understanding is that Samsungs are region-locked for both BR and DVD, and there is no code to remove this - if even if a player exploded tomorrow, and I had to purchase a replacement, it wouldn't be replaced by a Samsung.

2.  Installing a Samsung BR player alongside my existing infrastructure isn't a starter. Firstly, I don't want to spend the money on redundant hardware just to try Lightbox. Secondly, even if I did, I have no free HDMI inputs left on any TV.

3.  I have perfectly good media players installed in all rooms that work just fine with the competition (ie US Netflix, and presumably NZ Netflix soon as well) if I want a streaming service. Which makes an upgrade just to try lightbox even less compelling.

I wouldn't characterise it as "negativeness" so much as pointing out that a number of people, including myself, need you to add device compatibility in order for us to be interested. That's largely your problem if you want us as customers, not ours. I'm actually positive insofar as I'm delighted to see new entrants shaking up the incumbents and wish you success. It's just that without device compatibility, your service (and free trial) isn't attractive to me.

Come back with an app for WD Lives, or Android media players, and I'm in.


All valid points. Note I don't work for or with Lightbox, just my personal opinions.

Negativessness is probably the wrong word. Not all devices are supported but they are being added to which is good. If other smart TV's were supported that would be great as well as WDTV, but as Jakob mentioned, that isn't a simple or quick task. Yes, I am not only out of HDMI ports, I am already one short. I am unsure how many users have no option to try it, all I am meaning is that if the content works, the quality works, there is a cheap way in to get an easy to use STB. 



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  Reply # 1219456 21-Jan-2015 20:47
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I have the following devices connected to my TV which only has two HDMI inputs

via the AVR and a 5 portHDMI switch

- PS3
-  Sony BD player
- Netgear NeoTV Google TV box
- Popcorn Hour
- PC

then to the second HDMI port via another switch

- T-Box
- TVPad Asian TV streaming device
- Chromecast

It's a bit awkward but all managed via a Harmony One remote which can remotely switch inputs on the HDMI switches.

Another box for the Lightbox would be okay but there is no content that would interest me already having Netflix,Amazon, Hulu, BBC and iTV




System One: Popcorn Hour A200,  PS3 SuperSlim, NPVR and Plex Server running on Gigabyte Brix (Windows 10 Pro), Sony BDP-S390 BD player, Pioneer AVR, Raspberry Pi running Kodi and Plex, Panasonic 60" 3D plasma, Google Chromecast

System Two: Popcorn Hour A200 ,  Oppo BDP-80 BluRay Player with hardware mode to be region free, Vivitek HD1080P 1080P DLP projector with 100" screen. Harman Kardon HK AVR 254 7.1 receiver, Samsung 4K player, Google Chromecast

 


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https://plus.google.com/+laurencechiu

 

 


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  Reply # 1219460 21-Jan-2015 20:50
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lchiu7: I have the following devices connected to my TV which only has two HDMI inputs

via the AVR and a 5 portHDMI switch

- PS3
-  Sony BD player
- Netgear NeoTV Google TV box
- Popcorn Hour
- PC

then to the second HDMI port via another switch

- T-Box
- TVPad Asian TV streaming device
- Chromecast

It's a bit awkward but all managed via a Harmony One remote which can remotely switch inputs on the HDMI switches.

Another box for the Lightbox would be okay but there is no content that would interest me already having Netflix,Amazon, Hulu, BBC and iTV


Wow, I feel like I'm missing out. I have:

 

  • An XBox 360 - for playing XBox 360 games on
  • A Blu-Ray player - for playing BluRays and DVDs on
  • A Mac Mini - for everything else







iPad Air + iPhone SE + 2degrees 4tw!

These comments are my own and do not represent the opinions of 2degrees.




BDFL - Memuneh
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  Reply # 1219476 21-Jan-2015 21:14
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Hmmm. HTPC (Gigabyte BRIX), Logitech Skype HD Cam, Amazon Fire TV and Google Chromecast. With those everything in online content (except games) is pretty much covered. The Chromecast is actually in excess as Amazon Fire TV does everything - but it's a nice addition as it does Quickflix.





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