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  # 1042086 12-May-2014 11:19
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The question I would like to ask is, if you turn on the ping detector sub in a random location, what are the chances of picking up a random signal, ok make it four random signals? Some signal to noise ratio would also be helpful. For example a what signal to noise ratio threshold do experts consider a ping?




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  # 1042235 12-May-2014 12:58
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gzt:

Still not enough information released to know if the incomplete data was used to calculate the projected flight path. I'd like to see all the available data released.


Excellent link!

You do have to wonder why the calculations, etc hasn't been made public... seems to me that many knowledgeable people would help out if they could.

The fact that the corridors were drawn as lines, and the ping locations as points always seemed a bit suspect to me... I'd think engineers/mathematicians would be allowing for errors and consequently working with probabilities and 95% confidence limits and suchlike. So each ping location would be an elliptical? area, and the corridors would be dozens of miles wide.

For example, "The satellite data unit (SDU) in the airplane is allowed 300uSec max. to respond to a 'ping'." I wonder what the average and StdDev of SDU response times is? Worst case, the variability in response time could be between 0 and 300usec, i.e. 0-56 miles. Similarly, "the signal from the plane to the satellite uses a frequency of 1626 to 1660 MHz". I wonder what frequency the transmitter on the aircraft was actually tuned to, and how stable that frequency is with changes in temperature, pressure, etc.

But maybe we're just getting the dumbed-down media version of the results.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1042342 12-May-2014 14:21
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Technofreak:
joker97: I wonder if those who were supremely Confident are still as confident.

I never shared any confidence. As I said if they find it great, chances are, no one knows where it could be


An interesting article in gzt's post.

What hasn't been explained though, is the pings the Aussies tracked over several days, if they didn't come from MH370 where did they come from?.  

There were two of them (as was expected, one each from the CVR and FDR) and they were at the right frequency (frequency that doesn't occur naturally). If they didn't come from MH370 where did they come from?  No one has come up with a credible explanation to explain that these pings could have come from a source other than MH370.




I am wondering if they spent a great deal of time again searching for the pings, whether they would hear anything. I suspect they may, simply because there is a great deal of noise in the ocean. One thing is that the pings they did hear weren't actually quite at the right frequency anyway, but they justified that due to it being so deep. As per my previous post, I think the odds of find it, if it is in the ocean near this location, as very very low.
But the fact that they are reviewing everything again suggests that they now aren't even sure of that.

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  # 1048477 19-May-2014 23:22
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  # 1048483 20-May-2014 00:08
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After all the millions spent on searching, they appear to be no closer in finding out what happened to it, or where it may be.

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  # 1048515 20-May-2014 07:10
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I'm beginning to be convinced that someone doesn't want this to be found





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  # 1050081 20-May-2014 20:56
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joker97: apparently "somebody is lying" (rule no 1)

http://edition.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2014/05/15/exp-erin-dnt-clancy-inmarsat-raw-data-malaysia-airlines-plane.cnn.html

Hard to tell. Maybe just a misunderstanding about who 'owns' the raw data and therefore who has the right to release it. OOTH it is possible there is more than one possible interpretation of the data and the govt has selected the most politically favorable one.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1054498 27-May-2014 18:15
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so they do have the data after all




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  # 1054674 27-May-2014 23:38
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At least one of the leading independent experts on this finds the data consistent with the conclusions so far.

http://www.duncansteel.com/

Btw, he says the UK government was delaying the release of the Inmarsat data.

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  # 1056119 29-May-2014 17:53
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mattwnz: 

I am wondering if they spent a great deal of time again searching for the pings, whether they would hear anything. I suspect they may, simply because there is a great deal of noise in the ocean. One thing is that the pings they did hear weren't actually quite at the right frequency anyway, but they justified that due to it being so deep. As per my previous post, I think the odds of find it, if it is in the ocean near this location, as very very low.
But the fact that they are reviewing everything again suggests that they now aren't even sure of that.


This looks to now be the conclusion about the pings, and they likely didn't come from the black box at all.

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  # 1056131 29-May-2014 18:23
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Not so confident now are they




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  # 1056141 29-May-2014 18:33
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joker97: Not so confident now are they

 Yeap, I still don't think they will find it in the near future. It will need technology advancements to find it I think. Not unless some wreckage washes up, or it actually crashed on land somewhere. It's going to be one of those great mysteries like 'Jack the ripper', what caused the 'titanic to sink' etc.

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  # 1056150 29-May-2014 18:44
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Now back to the "Abducted by Aliens" theory..




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  # 1056179 29-May-2014 19:26
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I'm going for shot down somewhere. That then depends on where ... near the oil rig? If so why did they track it to the Indian ocean. If it reached the Indian ocean then maybe it was shot down over west Asia




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  # 1056181 29-May-2014 19:27
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Then who ... well who is very quiet are all suspects




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