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  Reply # 1919432 14-Dec-2017 09:43
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I have been camping about 5 times since then. I think we spent around $170 on a single room tent that fits a queen and 2 singles (with not a lot of extra room) and so far it's been pretty solid. 

 

Twice we have done the St Cuthberts overnight camp in their field with about 40 other families. It has been good fun, but it's a lot of work for 1 night. We camped at Parakai that went ok.

 

The big problem for me is how rough I feel in the morning. Stiff neck, not a great sleep. As a kid that stuff doesn't seem to bother you, but as you get a bit older....

 

 


BTR

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  Reply # 1919436 14-Dec-2017 10:04
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networkn:

 

@btr who are you talking to?

 

 

 

 

Sorry didn't realise how old this thread was, ignore my last comment lol.




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  Reply # 1919437 14-Dec-2017 10:05
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No worries


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  Reply # 1919438 14-Dec-2017 10:07
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Ruakaka campsite near Whangarei is brilliant. It's between an estuary (with a paddle-able river) and the sea.  Great swimming.  It's not too crowded and has communal cooking facilities and bathrooms. 20 minutes from Whangarei if it rains and you want to go to a movie.

 

There is a superette nearby, also a cafe and dairy within walking distance.  Good fishing for anything from mullet to snapper and kingfish within walking distance of the camp.  Fantastic spot for a kayak.  Very sociable camp-ground.

 

My top tips for camping are.

 

Tent: -

 

Find one you can stand up in.  Makes life easier and preserves sanity during bad weather

 

Use a silver tarp, some poles, additional pegs and guy ropes to make a second fly to go over your entire tent.  This will protect from heat, rain and birds.  I made mine longer than the tent so we had somewhere to sit outside if it was raining.

 

Pegs: -

 

Use helical or 3 bladed (like a mercedes logo) pegs

 

Take a cordless drill with a long ~10mm masonry bit to drill pilot holes for you pegs you can also use it to set/remove helical pegs

 

Get some damper-springs to connect your guy rope to your pegs: They stop gusts shock loading the pegs or tent.

 

Cooking: -

 

A portable BBQ with a side burner.  You will be able to cook anything on that and it's self supporting.  The two ring portable gas cookers work well - the one powered by an LPG bottle not a cartridge, but you then need a table or whatever.

 

A good large chilly bin with insulation foam in all panels (including lid) works well for meat, cheese, veges and dairy.  If you only open it couple of times a day and drain liquid regularly (choose one with a bung) ice will last 3 days - salt ice longer.  We always took a second cheap chilly bin for drinks, fruit and lunch stuff because that one would be opened more often - especially with kids. 

 

Lastly beware the camping progression.  You start off with a dome tent. Envy drives you to buy a multi-room canvas tent.  Tent assembly domestics drive you to a caravan.  Finally - packing, towing, parking and maintaining a caravan drives you to sell the caravan and use book a bach.





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  Reply # 1919466 14-Dec-2017 11:01
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We just spent a couple of weeks in Nov camping in Northern NSW, in a few locations on the coast between Nelson Bay and Byron Bay in the North.
Kind of minimal gear - we had to fit gear plus 4 adults in a rental SUV (Outlander), so couldn't get too carried away.  Borrowed some gear (cookers etc) from friends, bought cheap gear at Anaconda and some (airbeds) at K-Mart.  Left some gear with friends, brought some home with us.  Stayed in some national parks, some private campgrounds.  Some national park camping is free - apart from an $8/day per car fee. The more well appointed camping areas (not free) had covered gas BBQ facilities, kept very clean.
Some torrential sub-tropical storms in the North.  $92 4 man dome tents x 2 (reduced from $200+ using the "Briscoes sale" formula) didn't leak or get blown to pieces.  Crawly things not too much of a bother, though a bull-ant did get me on the toe (instant turbocharged bee-sting feeling) and I had to carefully remove a paralysis tick from one fellow camper's ear.
Locals / others in campgrounds very friendly.

 

Was great - though about 10 days was my limit with basic camping like that. This wasn't "glamping".

 

Brought one of the tents home - left the other gear with friends over there.  Warning that the biosecurity guys at the airport will take some time unpacking, inspecting, cleaning camping gear - not complaining at all, they're doing their jobs.

 

 


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  Reply # 1919472 14-Dec-2017 11:25
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Heh! Yeah, McMansion tents are getting popular at kiwi camp sites these days and people are turning up in small trucks to fit in the tent, outdoor kitchen plus all the furniture.

 

 


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  Reply # 1919478 14-Dec-2017 11:32
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networkn:

I have been camping about 5 times since then. I think we spent around $170 on a single room tent that fits a queen and 2 singles (with not a lot of extra room) and so far it's been pretty solid. 


Twice we have done the St Cuthberts overnight camp in their field with about 40 other families. It has been good fun, but it's a lot of work for 1 night. We camped at Parakai that went ok.


The big problem for me is how rough I feel in the morning. Stiff neck, not a great sleep. As a kid that stuff doesn't seem to bother you, but as you get a bit older....


 



I find camping is a ‘get used to’ thing now... by the third night your body is ‘used to’ sleeping like that and you get good nights rest (and less achy bones) thereafter.

Even sleeping in the motorhome for ‘just’ one night throws me totally off and leaves (less) aches and sleeplessness as a reminder, though 7 weeks left only a feeling of joy and wellbeing for having been ‘away’ 👍



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  Reply # 1919581 14-Dec-2017 14:32
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I recall this awesome time we went camping in Australia when I was very young. Slept beside a massive river, had an open fire and caught trout (which was done over the open fire!). I didn't know we were both trespassing and poaching at the time, but I recall clearly misunderstanding prosecuting and executing, and having a very very tense time. 

 

I don't know where in NZ you could do such a thing now? Are there any places that are safe, beside a river with trout that we could try and catch?


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  Reply # 1919593 14-Dec-2017 14:55
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MikeAqua:

 

Lastly beware the camping progression.  You start off with a dome tent. Envy drives you to buy a multi-room canvas tent.  Tent assembly domestics drive you to a caravan.  Finally - packing, towing, parking and maintaining a caravan drives you to sell the caravan and use book a bach.

 

 

This is super accurate. Relatedly, does anyone want to buy my caravan?


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  Reply # 1919759 14-Dec-2017 18:02
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MikeAqua:

 

Ruakaka campsite near Whangarei is brilliant. It's between an estuary (with a paddle-able river) and the sea.  Great swimming.  It's not too crowded and has communal cooking facilities and bathrooms. 20 minutes from Whangarei if it rains and you want to go to a movie.

 

There is a superette nearby, also a cafe and dairy within walking distance.  Good fishing for anything from mullet to snapper and kingfish within walking distance of the camp.  Fantastic spot for a kayak.  Very sociable camp-ground.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Which section of Ruakaka would you recommend for going with a 9yr old and 16yr old?

 

 

 

Loved it at Ohope Top10 last summer.


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  Reply # 1919920 14-Dec-2017 22:50
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networkn:

 

I recall this awesome time we went camping in Australia when I was very young. Slept beside a massive river, had an open fire and caught trout (which was done over the open fire!). I didn't know we were both trespassing and poaching at the time, but I recall clearly misunderstanding prosecuting and executing, and having a very very tense time. 

 

I don't know where in NZ you could do such a thing now? Are there any places that are safe, beside a river with trout that we could try and catch?

 

 

In the SI, yes - especially if you have 4WD.   Even with a car, there are plenty of accessible free camping sites near rivers.

 

Even in national parks with campgrounds, huts, "official" walks etc, if you camp (IIRC) 500m from a track, it's ok.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1920810 17-Dec-2017 16:42
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networkn:
SepticSceptic:
networkn:

Man anyone else sick of the crappy weather forecasters in NZ? 1 Day ago it was supposed to be Sunny Friday/Sat/Sunday. Today it's cloudy. Tomorrow it wil forecast rain and the reality is, it will probably be a Category 5 hurricane!



A weather rock (hung up with a string ) has better odds for weather:



  • If the rock is wet, it's raining.

  • If the rock is swinging, the wind is blowing.

  • If the rock casts a shadow, the sun is shining.

  • If the rock does not cast a shadow and is not wet, the sky is cloudy.

  • If the rock is not visible, it is foggy.

  • If the rock is white, it is snowing.

  • If the rock is coated with ice, there is a frost.

  • If the ice is thick, it's a heavy frost.

  • If the rock is bouncing, there is an earthquake.

  • If the rock is under water, there is a flood.

  • If the rock is warm, it is sunny.

  • If the rock is missing, there was a tornado.

  • If the rock is wet and swinging violently, there is a hurricane.




I can't find any rocks! I suspect weather people took them and used them for brains!


Waiuku actually have one on the tomb green:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/markandphilippa/5078918813

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  Reply # 1921191 18-Dec-2017 11:35
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jonb:

 

MikeAqua:

 

Ruakaka campsite near Whangarei ...

 

 

Which section of Ruakaka would you recommend for going with a 9yr old and 16yr old?

 

 

I've only ever camped in the section near the timber jetty.  I'm guessing at this time of year it's a matter of where/if they can fit you in and if you want a powered site.

 

 





Mike

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