Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
3167 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 987

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2154071 3-Jan-2019 19:21
5 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

The level of paranoia in here is hilarious. Customs barely have enough staff to do their regular job at the border, never mind tying up huge amounts of staff time by targeting hoards of random travellers and inspecting phones/tablets/laptops just for the hell of it (which they can't do anyway).

840 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 72

Trusted

  Reply # 2154072 3-Jan-2019 19:26
Send private message quote this post

Ah the obsession with end user physical devices

 

If this becomes a issue, take no device overseas and buy an inexpensive one when you get there and access or sync to your fav cloud services then

 

I can't see customs or police any time soon at airports asking people for every cloud login one has

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 


3167 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 987

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2154077 3-Jan-2019 19:33
Send private message quote this post

xlinknz:

Ah the obsession with end user physical devices


If this becomes a issue, take no device overseas and buy an inexpensive one when you get there and access or sync to your fav cloud services then


I can't see customs or police any time soon at airports asking people for every cloud login one has


 


 


 


 


No need to drag police into this. They will get involved if there's an offence or offending to be dealt with or a risk to safety of any persons or property. They won't take an active role in general processes in a Customs Controlled Area.

Edit: added "or" between "persons" and "property"

18879 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 5433

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 2154078 3-Jan-2019 19:36
4 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

landcruiserguy:

 

 

 

If you don't agree with me please post your gmail and cloud passwords on this thread.  Given that you don't have anything to hide then you should have no problems doing this.  If you aren't wiling to do this then you agree with me that we should all have the right to privacy.  Even if you don't believe in this right your customers and the people you communicate do so this should be respected.

 

 

I can't say how many times I have seen this argument used. It's so dumb. There is a HUGE difference between posting that information publically, and it being obtained by our elected officials and law enforcement officers. 

 

 


840 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 72

Trusted

  Reply # 2154079 3-Jan-2019 19:43
Send private message quote this post

Dratsab:
xlinknz:

 

Ah the obsession with end user physical devices

 

If this becomes a issue, take no device overseas and buy an inexpensive one when you get there and access or sync to your fav cloud services then

 

I can't see customs or police any time soon at airports asking people for every cloud login one has

 


No need to drag police into this. They will get involved if there's an offence or offending to be dealt with or a risk to safety of any persons property. They won't take an active role in general processes in a Customs Controlled Area.

 

Fair and good comment :)

 

My point was that any legitimate security interest constrained to the physical device is well limited

 

 

 

 


5277 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1144

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2154257 4-Jan-2019 10:42
Send private message quote this post

mudguard:
sross:

 

mudguard: That can't be correct. We had a work memo awhile ago telling us to avoid travelling through any areas that request it while we have work phones and laptops with us.

 

 

 

for domestic?

 



No, for international. I personally do very little international travel for work. However we are under instruction to reroute travel that requires access to devices.
This was around the time the US were talking about it rather than anything recently.

 

The rationale there is that in many places you can't be sure the access isn't to allow the local government in that country to "acquire" business information and intellectual property using national security as the excuse. 

The US has done this in the past. But they think they are the good guys, so it's OK.





____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


354 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 278


  Reply # 2154327 4-Jan-2019 13:02
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Linuxluver:

mudguard:
sross:


mudguard: That can't be correct. We had a work memo awhile ago telling us to avoid travelling through any areas that request it while we have work phones and laptops with us.


 


for domestic?




No, for international. I personally do very little international travel for work. However we are under instruction to reroute travel that requires access to devices.
This was around the time the US were talking about it rather than anything recently.


The rationale there is that in many places you can't be sure the access isn't to allow the local government in that country to "acquire" business information and intellectual property using national security as the excuse. 

The US has done this in the past. But they think they are the good guys, so it's OK.


I would be interested in a citation to support this assertion.




BlinkyBill

1206 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 307


  Reply # 2154375 4-Jan-2019 13:42
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Let's say you were asked to provide passwords to all your cloud accounts that are not on your cheap 'travel' phone.   If you use a password manager on your devices left at home,  you could say quite honestly that because of the password manager you simply have no recall of the passwords at all.


3054 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 477

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2154841 5-Jan-2019 13:12
Send private message quote this post

sbiddle:

 

The fact you travel internationally and your work is so secretive that this is a concern to you along with the fact your employer you should have proper documented processes in place for dealing with such a scenario really concerns me. You should be discussing this with your employer ASAP.

 

 

Indeed. Even the US Government has policies in place for when employees carry their work devices through borders where inspection by customs officials may occur (and, for what it's worth, the process is not "refuse the search" it is "permit the search, and contact information security to notify of the search so that appropriate measures can be taken if necessary").

 

If the information is that sensitive (i.e. national security) it should never cross borders outside of a diplomatic bag anyway, which Customs would not inspect or seize.

 

amiga500:

 

Let's say you were asked to provide passwords to all your cloud accounts that are not on your cheap 'travel' phone.   If you use a password manager on your devices left at home,  you could say quite honestly that because of the password manager you simply have no recall of the passwords at all.

 

 

Why is everyone harping on about cloud accounts? They are nothing to do with this topic, as Customs have explicitly stated that they will not inspect cloud accounts, and the legislation does not empower them to. Yet people continue banging on about something that is both explicitly stated by policy and legislation to be out of scope.


3054 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 477

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2154843 5-Jan-2019 13:17
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

BlinkyBill:
Linuxluver:

 

The rationale there is that in many places you can't be sure the access isn't to allow the local government in that country to "acquire" business information and intellectual property using national security as the excuse. 

The US has done this in the past. But they think they are the good guys, so it's OK.

 


I would be interested in a citation to support this assertion.

 

You won't find one, as it never happened.


354 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 278


  Reply # 2154945 5-Jan-2019 16:25
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Kyanar:

BlinkyBill:
Linuxluver:


The rationale there is that in many places you can't be sure the access isn't to allow the local government in that country to "acquire" business information and intellectual property using national security as the excuse. 

The US has done this in the past. But they think they are the good guys, so it's OK.



I would be interested in a citation to support this assertion.


You won't find one, as it never happened.


Of course not, but I’m not 100% infallible, so offered the opportunity. The silence speaks volumes.




BlinkyBill

1546 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 205


  Reply # 2155605 7-Jan-2019 09:52
Send private message quote this post

networkn:

 

landcruiserguy:

 

If you don't agree with me please post your gmail and cloud passwords on this thread.  Given that you don't have anything to hide then you should have no problems doing this.  If you aren't wiling to do this then you agree with me that we should all have the right to privacy.  Even if you don't believe in this right your customers and the people you communicate do so this should be respected.

 

 

I can't say how many times I have seen this argument used. It's so dumb. There is a HUGE difference between posting that information publically, and it being obtained by our elected officials and law enforcement officers. 

 

 

Not only that, but if I post my Gmail password here then that would allow people to send emails from my account, which would esentially be identity theft and could potentially be disastrous for me. I'd have no problem with revealing the contents of any emails sitting in my Gmail account (except for those that might allow identity theft). So yes, the whole "post your Gmail login details if you have nothing to hide" arguement is silly.


206 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 101


  Reply # 2155786 7-Jan-2019 13:55
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

You guys don't get it. There are two issues here:

1) If Customs are too busy to implement this (i.e. we don't have to worry about it) then why have the law? If we have the law on the books it will be abused.

2) Nothing to hide nothing to fear. It seems that people don't want to post their Gmail passwords here. Why is that? You have nothing to hide right? The idea that you don't want to give your password to a random stranger but you will to a Customs officer seems odd. Unless of course in the entire history of humanity there has never been a bent official.

Finally, even if you do trust whoever it is to apply the law justly, and slurp up all your data, what happens when the database it is stored in is compromised? (That's when, not if). Or, what happens when we get a new government who'd like to see what everyone has been up to? Far safer (from an individual's point of view) to not collect the data in the first place.

If anyone does support this, what precisely do you think it is protecting us from? (Don't say terrorists, that's pathetic).


928 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 143


  Reply # 2155876 7-Jan-2019 15:44
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

irongarment: You guys don't get it. There are two issues here:

1) If Customs are too busy to implement this (i.e. we don't have to worry about it) then why have the law? If we have the law on the books it will be abused.

2) Nothing to hide nothing to fear. It seems that people don't want to post their Gmail passwords here. Why is that? You have nothing to hide right? The idea that you don't want to give your password to a random stranger but you will to a Customs officer seems odd. Unless of course in the entire history of humanity there has never been a bent official.

Finally, even if you do trust whoever it is to apply the law justly, and slurp up all your data, what happens when the database it is stored in is compromised? (That's when, not if). Or, what happens when we get a new government who'd like to see what everyone has been up to? Far safer (from an individual's point of view) to not collect the data in the first place.

If anyone does support this, what precisely do you think it is protecting us from? (Don't say terrorists, that's pathetic).

 

 

 

Illegal aliens, peadophiles, fraudsters, sex traffickers/offenders etc etc.

 

Oh, and terrorists.


3054 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 477

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 2156729 9-Jan-2019 07:21
Send private message quote this post

irongarment: 2) Nothing to hide nothing to fear. It seems that people don't want to post their Gmail passwords here. Why is that? You have nothing to hide right? The idea that you don't want to give your password to a random stranger but you will to a Customs officer seems odd. Unless of course in the entire history of humanity there has never been a bent official.

 

What's your Gmail password got to do with anything? You're again banging on about an internet service account, which is both out of scope for this law, and outside Customs policy for device inspection. It's got nothing to do with this at all, apart from being a convenient strawman for you.


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Geekzone Live »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.