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#223147 15-Sep-2017 07:08
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Anybody know more or less how many people voted before the tax policy was released?

 

Personally I would be very peed off if I had voted early, more so if I had voted labour. 

 

Whats everybody's thoughts?

 

 


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  #1866623 15-Sep-2017 07:48
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90,000 have already voted, so maybe 80,000 more or less before the tax policy was released.

 

The campaign is still underway, if you voted early, thats your fault. Unless you expect no new policies and no campaigning for the last almost 2 weeks, then all early votes run the risk of things changing.

 

Why would you be more peed off if you voted Labour? You trust the Tax reforms, and that they will wait 3 years doesnt make it a non Labour vote still. If you wanted to vote Labour, but voted elsewhere as you cannot give the trust they want in the tax reviews, then you can be peed off


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  #1866638 15-Sep-2017 08:16
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I'm with tdgeek, if you vote early you know you might miss late information. Labour's decision won't change my vote at any rate. Also, I would have voted by now but for some weird reason my town won't have early voting till next week. *rolls eyes at annoying lack of place to vote*

 
 
 
 


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  #1866644 15-Sep-2017 08:34
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Given that some people HAVE to vote early for reasons such as not being in the country when the election is taking place, perhaps parties should be obligated to set out policies by a certain date after which they cannot change them until after the election.

 

 

 

If, on election to power, they then immediately change what they were voted in on, they would no doubt have to suffer voter fallout because of it.

 

 

 

Labour's decision won't make me vote or not vote for them, since I never would - but then that is hardly news! cool






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  #1866649 15-Sep-2017 08:42
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Geektastic:

 

Given that some people HAVE to vote early for reasons such as not being in the country when the election is taking place, perhaps parties should be obligated to set out policies by a certain date after which they cannot change them until after the election.

 

 

 

If, on election to power, they then immediately change what they were voted in on, they would no doubt have to suffer voter fallout because of it.

 

 

 

Labour's decision won't make me vote or not vote for them, since I never would - but then that is hardly news! cool

 

 

You actually mean end the campaign early, so it goes eerily silent for 10 days, until people get reminded its voting day tomorrow. Any new policy or any new stance is the same thing, and you would expect something new every day. Maybe not groundbreaking, but new and affects your vote

 

90,000 have voted, they haven't as they have to, they want to.


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  #1866731 15-Sep-2017 10:44
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It is very much to Labour's credit that they actually listen to voters and are prepared to adjust their policy accordingly. All the more reason to vote for them.

 

 





I don't think there is ever a bad time to talk about how absurd war is, how old men make decisions and young people die. - George Clooney
 


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  #1866741 15-Sep-2017 10:57
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So we can vote for a government that changes its mind, or a government that lies. This is only the latest in a long list.





I don't think there is ever a bad time to talk about how absurd war is, how old men make decisions and young people die. - George Clooney
 


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  #1866796 15-Sep-2017 12:01
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Rikkitic:

 

It is very much to Labour's credit that they actually listen to voters and are prepared to adjust their policy accordingly. All the more reason to vote for them.

 

 

 

 

I agree although I do find it amusing as well. How many times did they have a go at John Key for doing something similar.


 
 
 
 


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  #1866821 15-Sep-2017 12:46
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Yep, John Key flip flops, Jacinda Ardern listens to the voters

 

Pot / Kettle?

 

I have no problem with people changing their mind, or their position if they are proven wrong, it shows maturity to admit you made a bad call and then sort it out, but call it what it is, not try and paint it up as anything else


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  #1866837 15-Sep-2017 12:58
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sen8or:

 

Yep, John Key flip flops, Jacinda Ardern listens to the voters

 

Pot / Kettle?

 

I have no problem with people changing their mind, or their position if they are proven wrong, it shows maturity to admit you made a bad call and then sort it out, but call it what it is, not try and paint it up as anything else

 

 

I'm reposting what I said in another thread, but seeing as the same thing is coming up here....

 

I don't see it as a 'flip flop' at all - I really detest the idea that when politicians (of any ilk) make promises, decisions or propose policy that they are forevermore locked into that position and any adaption is a 'flip-flop'. If you promise to do something, then change your position without further information or because you never intended to do what you promised in the first place - that is a flip-flop. If you change a position because you're learned more about something, or the circumstances have changed - that's sensible and pragmatic.

 

The burden is on them to explain and demonstrate what has changed, or how they have adapted their thinking to justify the change of position rather than 'flip-flopped'. In my view, Labour has done this more than adequately in this case - they have listed to the people, and responded in kind. 





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  #1866878 15-Sep-2017 14:03
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Its simple...Labour didnt have a policy on taxation other then to form a committee. They still dont have a policy on taxation and are still forming a committee to help them formulate a policy!

 

The only difference is that they have now said they wont implement any changes in the next 3 years.

 

Its still quite bad that they dont have a taxation policy imo.

 

Jacinda does talk a lot about a whole lot of nothing. She makes nothing sound quite attractive actually.


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  #1866931 15-Sep-2017 15:00
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ajobbins:

 

sen8or:

 

Yep, John Key flip flops, Jacinda Ardern listens to the voters

 

Pot / Kettle?

 

I have no problem with people changing their mind, or their position if they are proven wrong, it shows maturity to admit you made a bad call and then sort it out, but call it what it is, not try and paint it up as anything else

 

 

I'm reposting what I said in another thread, but seeing as the same thing is coming up here....

 

I don't see it as a 'flip flop' at all - I really detest the idea that when politicians (of any ilk) make promises, decisions or propose policy that they are forevermore locked into that position and any adaption is a 'flip-flop'. If you promise to do something, then change your position without further information or because you never intended to do what you promised in the first place - that is a flip-flop. If you change a position because you're learned more about something, or the circumstances have changed - that's sensible and pragmatic.

 

The burden is on them to explain and demonstrate what has changed, or how they have adapted their thinking to justify the change of position rather than 'flip-flopped'. In my view, Labour has done this more than adequately in this case - they have listed to the people, and responded in kind. 

 

 

I'm not disagreeing with their change of mind and its quite a sensible move. Problem is, last election (or was it the one before), they were all over Key like a rash for his "flip flops", changing decisions, now its ok and "pragmatic". However you want to look at it, they are doing the same thing Key had done in the past.

 

"listened to the people" is simply politicians speak for "$hit! we are losing votes and won't get elected, time to change tact". Again, if their original call was wrong, then this makes sense to do so, but political spin is political spin, regardless of whether is spins to the left or the right


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  #1867134 15-Sep-2017 23:38
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Lol how about John Key listens to the voters and Jacinda Arden flip flops? Depends who's telling the story eh.

 

I'd rather a qualified working group of experts look at the tax system and make recommendations than have someone with a degree in zoology who failed 8/11 economics papers and has no apparent expertise in Finance being in charge of tax :)


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  #1867300 16-Sep-2017 14:30
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Depends on who hand picks the experts and which pool they drank from. Whats the line "theres lies, damn lies and statistics", or something like that. Any two people can look at the same information and interpret it differently, never more so than with something like economics which is subjective interpretation of "market data".

 

I can already predict what the working group will recommend, Jacinda has already voiced her opinions on the range of options.

 

Time will tell I guess 


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  #1867345 16-Sep-2017 15:03
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labour is encouraging people to vote early...eg Jacinda and Helen Clark etc so we cant change our mind.


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  #1867391 16-Sep-2017 19:55
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Yeah because if people vote early then come election day they're not going to think "oh I can't be bothered voting today"...


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