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  Reply # 1912339 3-Dec-2017 17:58
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Rikkitic:

 

I am always perplexed by threads like this. Coming from Europe, I don’t understand why it is even an issue.

 

In Europe, there are many languages and cultures that cross national boundaries. Although there have been ethnic conflicts at different times and places, and recent immigration is causing new concerns, many countries recognise the value of minority languages and cultures and try to respect and even encourage them.

 

I like to travel and I enjoy the differences I encounter. I like experiencing the different ways people live, and I like learning the different words they use for things. I would hate to live in a world where everything is exactly the same. I would hate to live in a gated community occupied only by Don Brash’s. What a dreary, boring place that would be!

 

In Holland, nearly everything on TV and in the cinema is subtitled. This is because Holland is a small country (like New Zealand) and most media content is in other languages. When I first came to New Zealand I missed that. I was used to reading along with whatever I was hearing, even if I understood it.

 

Language and culture are an essential component of identity. Maori are part of New Zealand. They have every right to want to use their language and customs on the national stage. Why shouldn’t they? We would all be enriched by it.

 

Personally, I think the Maori language should be much more prominent here than it is. I don’t understand why all non-Maori programming on all television channels is not subtitled in Te Reo, and all Maori programming is not also in English. This makes a lot more sense than the Maori ghettos currently on TV and it wouldn’t kill some of the rednecks in this country to pick up a few Maori phrases. Who knows? They might even enjoy the experience of learning something new!

 

 

 

 

I can only do a +1 on your comment. Needs to be more. I am a while kiwi male. My late in law uncle was a son of the one of the last pure Maori. My third daughter is 1/32 Maori, she embraces it. I am  a 100% while kiwi male, Scottish heritage, what does Maori mean to me? Well, as a kid racism did not exist. Maybe it did , but I was a kid and us kids were kids, so it didnt. 

 

Sadly, we are a non racist country, as thats the law, but we are.

 

Brickbat to NZ

 

 


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  Reply # 1912366 3-Dec-2017 18:41
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MikeB4: ]

It is our culture and part of our identity. It is very important.

 

Ummm... while I have nothing against Te Reo, and no objection to it being on National Radio, that's a bit of a sweeping statement. It has very little to do with my culture, and nothing at all to do with my identity.

 

If someone has an interest in Te Reo and wants to learn it then I applaud that. Good for them, and it's a worthy thing to do. But I would say that about someone who wants to learn any language, be it Mandarin, Spanish, Russian or Latin. And, to be honest, it means no more to me personally than any of those languages - no matter how many times I'm told it should.

 

If I was going to learn a language for cultural/identity reasons then it would be Gaelic, not Te Reo.

 

Having said that, I agree that Don Brash is a bit of a fossil, and not sure why he is getting any air time with this. Other than central banking and monetary economics, where I willingly concede he is an expert of some international stature, I'm not sure why his views on anything are newsworthy?


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  Reply # 1912379 3-Dec-2017 19:42
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I long for the day that my mokopuna do not have to put up with this garbage.




Mike
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The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

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The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1912384 3-Dec-2017 19:59
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JimmyH:

MikeB4: ]

It is our culture and part of our identity. It is very important.


Ummm... while I have nothing against Te Reo, and no objection to it being on National Radio, that's a bit of a sweeping statement. It has very little to do with my culture, and nothing at all to do with my identity.


If someone has an interest in Te Reo and wants to learn it then I applaud that. Good for them, and it's a worthy thing to do. But I would say that about someone who wants to learn any language, be it Mandarin, Spanish, Russian or Latin. And, to be honest, it means no more to me personally than any of those languages - no matter how many times I'm told it should.


If I was going to learn a language for cultural/identity reasons then it would be Gaelic, not Te Reo.


Having said that, I agree that Don Brash is a bit of a fossil, and not sure why he is getting any air time with this. Other than central banking and monetary economics, where I willingly concede he is an expert of some international stature, I'm not sure why his views on anything are newsworthy?



Acknowledging and participating in our culture given us by the tangata whenua does not mean we have to deny our birthright, reference my avatar.




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1912456 3-Dec-2017 23:21
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MaxLV:

 

old3eyes:

 

MikeB4:

 

It is an official language why wouldn't they encourage it?

 

 

Why would you want to ram it down people's throats who do want it??  Seems to be the trendy thing these days..

 



There is a 20 second (at best) Te Reo announcement ant the top of the hour (before the news bulletin).  Other than that there's only an occasional 10-15 second Te Reo announcement. How is that ramming it down peoples throats?
This is on RNZ National programme. 

 

 

Actually it's on every signoff from each reporter that covers a news item. So several times per news slot. 

 

If RNZ using Te Reo like this is what is required to preserve the Maori language then there is not much point. It certainly doesn't encourage me to take more interest in the Maori language.

 

I'm all for the preservation of the Maori language and culture but it will only be successful if it happens from the inside, not from the outside. How many Maori bother to encourage the speaking of Maori in the home?

 

One thing that really bugs me is the way one Maori dialect is forced on all Maori. One example being the spelling and pronunciation of Wanganui. I understand the Maori from the Wanganui area didn't/don't pronounce the "H" like the Maori did in some other areas. I know this is true of the Maori from the Taranaki region. Since the Maori language was only a spoken language till the European arrived then it's my belief that Wanganui is the correct spelling to match with the way it was/is spoken by the Maori people that originally settled in the Wanganui district.





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  Reply # 1912457 3-Dec-2017 23:37
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MikeB4: I long for the day that my mokopuna do not have to put up with this garbage.

 

Prior to this day, how many times have you used this word? 


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  Reply # 1912460 4-Dec-2017 05:07
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Technofreak:

 

MaxLV:

 

old3eyes:

 

MikeB4:

 

It is an official language why wouldn't they encourage it?

 

 

Why would you want to ram it down people's throats who do want it??  Seems to be the trendy thing these days..

 



There is a 20 second (at best) Te Reo announcement ant the top of the hour (before the news bulletin).  Other than that there's only an occasional 10-15 second Te Reo announcement. How is that ramming it down peoples throats?
This is on RNZ National programme. 

 

 

Actually it's on every signoff from each reporter that covers a news item. So several times per news slot. 

 

If RNZ using Te Reo like this is what is required to preserve the Maori language then there is not much point. It certainly doesn't encourage me to take more interest in the Maori language.

 

I'm all for the preservation of the Maori language and culture but it will only be successful if it happens from the inside, not from the outside. How many Maori bother to encourage the speaking of Maori in the home?

 

One thing that really bugs me is the way one Maori dialect is forced on all Maori. One example being the spelling and pronunciation of Wanganui. I understand the Maori from the Wanganui area didn't/don't pronounce the "H" like the Maori did in some other areas. I know this is true of the Maori from the Taranaki region. Since the Maori language was only a spoken language till the European arrived then it's my belief that Wanganui is the correct spelling to match with the way it was/is spoken by the Maori people that originally settled in the Wanganui district.

 

 

What bugs me with the English language is why don't they all use the word Bach and not Crib, or why don't we all roll our r's when we pronounce Invecargill as they do in Invercargil? 

 

 


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  Reply # 1912462 4-Dec-2017 06:43
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@networkn I could not say how many times I call my Maori grand children my mokopuna. Call you recall how many times you have said son or daughter or child or children?




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1912489 4-Dec-2017 09:11
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JimmyH:

 

MikeB4: ]

It is our culture and part of our identity. It is very important.

 

Ummm... while I have nothing against Te Reo, and no objection to it being on National Radio, that's a bit of a sweeping statement. It has very little to do with my culture, and nothing at all to do with my identity.

 

If someone has an interest in Te Reo and wants to learn it then I applaud that. Good for them, and it's a worthy thing to do. But I would say that about someone who wants to learn any language, be it Mandarin, Spanish, Russian or Latin. And, to be honest, it means no more to me personally than any of those languages - no matter how many times I'm told it should.

 

If I was going to learn a language for cultural/identity reasons then it would be Gaelic, not Te Reo.

 

Having said that, I agree that Don Brash is a bit of a fossil, and not sure why he is getting any air time with this. Other than central banking and monetary economics, where I willingly concede he is an expert of some international stature, I'm not sure why his views on anything are newsworthy?

 



It is a very significant part of New Zealand culture and history, in case you're not aware, it is one of the two official languages of New Zealand and just as important as the other one.
  


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  Reply # 1912496 4-Dec-2017 09:18
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MaxLV:

 


It is a very significant part of New Zealand culture and history, in case you're not aware, it is one of the two official languages of New Zealand and just as important as the other one.
  

 

 

I agree with your sentiments around it being one of our two official languages and being significant as far as our history and culture, but as to it's importance being equal to English, no, I can't get with that. If we could only have one language here, are you suggesting Maori would have equal standing in priority? I don't think so. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1912509 4-Dec-2017 09:34
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Te Reo is not a threat it's an opportunity. An opportunity to expand and enrich oneself..




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1912519 4-Dec-2017 09:39
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MikeB4: Te Reo is not a threat it's an opportunity. An opportunity to expand and enrich oneself..

 

Most people barely have the time to learn 1 language, if I was to learn a second language, it would be one that would have career-enhancing opportunities and for most people that would mean Chinese or another more widely spoken language, rather than Maori. 

 

I am not having a go at Te Reo, but people need to be realistic about the benefits of learning it overall. If you have a familial and or cultural link to it, then you will have a greater reason than most to learn it. 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1912520 4-Dec-2017 09:40
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networkn:

MikeB4: Te Reo is not a threat it's an opportunity. An opportunity to expand and enrich oneself..


Most people barely have the time to learn 1 language, if I was to learn a second language, it would be one that would have career-enhancing opportunities and for most people that would mean Chinese or another more widely spoken language, rather than Maori. 


I am not having a go at Te Reo, but people need to be realistic about the benefits of learning it overall. If you have a familial and or cultural link to it, then you will have a greater reason than most to learn it. 


 


 



It's not always about career and money.




Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

 Mac user, Windows curser, Chrome OS desired.

 

The great divide is the lies from both sides.

 

 


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  Reply # 1912521 4-Dec-2017 09:43
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MikeB4:
networkn:

 

MikeB4: Te Reo is not a threat it's an opportunity. An opportunity to expand and enrich oneself..

 

 

 

Most people barely have the time to learn 1 language, if I was to learn a second language, it would be one that would have career-enhancing opportunities and for most people that would mean Chinese or another more widely spoken language, rather than Maori. 

 

 

 

I am not having a go at Te Reo, but people need to be realistic about the benefits of learning it overall. If you have a familial and or cultural link to it, then you will have a greater reason than most to learn it. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



It's not always about career and money.

 

Hence I stated, if you have a cultural or familial link you will feel differently. 




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  Reply # 1912524 4-Dec-2017 09:55
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Had NZ been colonised by another Nation such as France or Portugal we would now have a language that is less useful than English.    The French are so desperate to preserve the French language that newspapers in English are actually printed in Belgium and brought into France.    If you stay in a hotel you may find an English speaking news channel but it will come from Spain and so on.    Go to many countries in Europe & often the younger people speak English well - they may have had English lessons from age 5 or 6 to 12 years or more.

 

Get on a plane just about anywhere & if they have a safety briefing and greeting the second language will be English. (I say this based on my very limited international travel, and from watching too many trip reports on Youtube!)   Likewise for airports the signage will be in the language of the country plus in English.  English is the language used for air traffic control.    From an ease of use & maybe even safety,  this is an advantage for pilots of Qantas and Air New Zealand.  When you check in at CDG in Paris you may be served by a person who can speak perfect English.

 

So, what I am saying is that every person in NZ should be very grateful that we have English.    And yes, learning another language is a really really good thing to do.  

 

 

 

 


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