Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | ... | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | ... | 68
Fat bottom Trump
10551 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 2201814 19-Mar-2019 15:59
3 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

freitasm:

 

Just received:

 

 

A call from the companies providing internet access for the great majority of New Zealanders, to the companies with the greatest influence over social media content

 

You may be aware that on the afternoon of Friday 15 March, three of New Zealand’s largest broadband providers, Vodafone NZ, Spark and 2degrees, took the unprecedented step to jointly identify and suspend access to web sites that were hosting video footage taken by the gunman related to the horrific terrorism incident in Christchurch.

 

As key industry players, we believed this extraordinary step was the right thing to do in such extreme and tragic circumstances. Other New Zealand broadband providers have also taken steps to restrict availability of this content, although they may be taking a different approach technically.

 

We also accept it is impossible as internet service providers to prevent completely access to this material. But hopefully we have made it more difficult for this content to be viewed and shared - reducing the risk our customers may inadvertently be exposed to it and limiting the publicity the gunman was clearly seeking.

 

We acknowledge that in some circumstances access to legitimate content may have been prevented, and that this raises questions about censorship. For that we apologise to our customers. This is all the more reason why an urgent and broader discussion is required.

 

Internet service providers are the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff, with blunt tools involving the blocking of sites after the fact. The greatest challenge is how to prevent this sort of material being uploaded and shared on social media platforms and forums.

 

We call on Facebook, Twitter and Google, whose platforms carry so much content, to be a part of an urgent discussion at an industry and New Zealand Government level on an enduring solution to this issue.

 

We appreciate this is a global issue, however the discussion must start somewhere. We must find the right balance between internet freedom and the need to protect New Zealanders, especially the young and vulnerable, from harmful content. Social media companies and hosting platforms that enable the sharing of user generated content with the public have a legal duty of care to protect their users and wider society by preventing the uploading and sharing of content such as this video.

 

Although we recognise the speed with which social network companies sought to remove Friday’s video once they were made aware of it, this was still a response to material that was rapidly spreading globally and should never have been made available online. We believe society has the right to expect companies such as yours to take more responsibility for the content on their platforms.

 

Content sharing platforms have a duty of care to proactively monitor for harmful content, act expeditiously to remove content which is flagged to them as illegal and ensure that such material – once identified – cannot be re-uploaded.

 

Technology can be a powerful force for good. The very same platforms that were used to share the video were also used to mobilise outpourings of support. But more needs to be done to prevent horrific content being uploaded. Already there are AI techniques that we believe can be used to identify content such as this video, in the same way that copyright infringements can be identified. These must be prioritised as a matter of urgency.

 

For the most serious types of content, such as terrorist content, more onerous requirements should apply, such as proposed in Europe, including take down within a specified period, proactive measures and fines for failure to do so. Consumers have the right to be protected whether using services funded by money or data.

 

Now is the time for this conversation to be had, and we call on all of you to join us at the table and be part of the solution.

 

Simon Mouter (Managing Director, Spark). Jason Paris (Chief Executive, Vodafone NZ), Stewart Sherriff (Chief Executive 2degrees)

 

 

 

Well done. Good on them for taking this initiative. 

 

I have always made it a bit of a hobby to try to get around censorship and suppression orders. I have never done anything with the information. I just wanted to see if I could. When the beheading videos started to appear, I knew I could see those as well, especially in the beginning, but I made a principled decision not to. That was going too far. When this horrible attack occurred in Christchurch, I wasn't even tempted, though I knew how to find the videos. I probably still could. I still am not tempted. 

 

Playing around to see what you are capable of is one thing. This is something else. Even now, those with the know-how and patience could probably find this awful stuff. I hope anyone who is tempted to will stop and think about it. Think about what you are doing. Think about the people who died. Think about the ones left behind who are hurting. You don't need to see this crap. You don't need to give that depraved madman the attention he craves. This is about something much bigger than a misplaced free speech principle.

 

I hope the Facebooks and YouTubes and Twitters and other social media platforms will be prodded by this action to show a little compassion and take some responsibility themselves. We live in a different world now.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


788 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2201823 19-Mar-2019 16:09
5 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

From some of the banking industry:

 

 

 

https://twitter.com/TSB_NZ/status/1107829054281932801

 

TSB has suspended all advertising on social media in the wake of the tragic events in Christchurch. TSB is disappointed in the role social media played in Friday’s tragedy and thinks it’s inappropriate to continue to support this channel. Our thoughts are with all those affected.

 

 

 

https://twitter.com/WestpacNZ/status/1107791340522225664

 

Westpac NZ has suspended all advertising on social media networks until further notice, including Facebook, and we will be engaging with social media companies about the publishing of harmful content.

 

 

 

media statement(pdf)

 

 


BDFL - Memuneh
64454 posts

Uber Geek

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2201834 19-Mar-2019 16:16
6 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

 

PM House Statement on Christchurch mosques terror attack

 

Mr Speaker,

 

Al salam Alaikum

 

Peace be upon you. And peace be upon all of us.

 

Mr Speaker the 15th of March will now forever be a day etched in our collective memories. On a quiet Friday afternoon a man stormed into a place of peaceful worship and took away the lives of 50 people.

 

That quiet Friday afternoon has become our darkest of days.

 

But for the families, it was more than that. It was the day that the simple act of prayer – of practising their Muslim faith and religion – led to the loss of their loved ones lives.

 

Those loved ones, were brothers, daughters, fathers and children.

 

They were New Zealanders. They are us.

 

And because they are us, we, as a nation, we mourn them.

 

We feel a huge duty of care to them. And Mr Speaker, we have so much we feel the need to say and to do.

 

One of the roles I never anticipated having, and hoped never to have, is to voice the grief of a nation.

 

At this time, it has been second only to securing the care of those affected, and the safety of everyone.

 

And in this role, I wanted to speak directly to the families. We cannot know your grief, but we can walk with you at every stage. We can. And we will, surround you with aroha, manaakitanga and all that makes us, us. Our hearts are heavy but our spirit is strong.

 

Mr Speaker, 6 minutes after a 111 call was placed alerting the police to the shootings at Al-Noor mosque, police were on the scene.

 

The arrest itself was nothing short of an act of bravery. Two country police officers rammed the vehicle from which the offender was still shooting. They pulled open his car door, when there were explosives inside, and pulled him out.

 

I know we all wish to acknowledge that their acts put the safety of New Zealanders above their own, and we thank them.

 

But they were not the only ones who showed extraordinary courage.

 

Naeem Rashid, originally from Pakistan, died after rushing at the terrorist and trying to wrestle the gun from him. He lost his life trying to save those who were worshipping alongside him.

 

Abdul Aziz, originally from Afghanistan, confronted and faced down the armed terrorist after grabbing the nearest thing to hand – a simple eftpos machine. He risked his life and no doubt saved many with his selfless bravery.

 

There will be countless stories, some of which we may never know, but to each, we acknowledge you in this place, in this House.

 

For many of us the first sign of the scale of this terrorist attack was the images of ambulance staff transporting victims to Christchurch hospital.

 

To the first responders, the ambulance staff and the health professionals who have assisted – and who continue to assist those who have been injured.

 

Please accept the heartfelt thanks of us all. I saw first-hand your care and your professionalism in the face of extraordinary challenges. We are proud of your work, and incredibly grateful for it.

 

Mr Speaker, if you'll allow, I'd like to talk about some of the immediate measures currently in place especially to ensure the safety of our Muslim community, and more broadly the safety of everyone.

 

As a nation, we do remain on high alert. While there isn’t a specific threat at present, we are maintaining vigilance.

 

Unfortunately, we have seen in countries that know the horrors of terrorism more than us, there is a pattern of increased tension and actions over the weeks that follow that means we do need to ensure that vigilance is maintained.

 

There is an additional and ongoing security presence in Christchurch, and as the police have indicated, there will continue to be a police presence at mosques around the country while their doors are open. When they are closed, police will be in the vicinity.

 

There is a huge focus on ensuring the needs of families are met. That has to be our priority. A community welfare centre has been set up near the hospital in Christchurch to make sure people know how to access support.

 

Visas for family members overseas are being prioritised so that they can attend funerals. Funeral costs are covered, and we have moved quickly to ensure that this includes repatriation costs for any family members who would like to move their loved ones away from New Zealand.

 

We are working to provide mental health and social support. The 1737 number yesterday received roughly 600 texts or phonecalls. They are on average lasting around 40 minutes, and I encourage anyone in need to reach out and use these services. They are there for you.

 

Our language service has also provided support from more than 5000 contacts, ensuring whether you are ACC or MSD, you are able to pass on the support that is needed, in the language that is needed. To all those working within this service, we say thank you.

 

Our security and intelligence services are receiving a range of additional information. As has been the case in the past, these are being taken extremely seriously, and they are being followed up.

 

I know though Mr Speaker, that there have rightly been questions around how this could have happened here. In a place that prides itself on being open, peaceful, diverse.

 

And there is anger that it has happened here.

 

There are many questions that need to be answered, and the assurance that I give you is that they will be.

 

Yesterday Cabinet agreed that an inquiry, one that looks into the events that led up to the attack on 15 March, will occur. We will examine what we did know, could have known, or should have known. We cannot allow this to happen again.

 

Part of ensuring the safety of New Zealanders must include a frank examination of our gun laws.

 

As I have already said Mr Speaker, our gun laws will change. Cabinet met yesterday and made in-principle decisions, 72 hours after the attack.

 

Before we meet again next Monday, these decisions will be announced.

 

Mr Speaker, there is one person at the centre of this act of terror against our Muslim community in New Zealand.

 

A 28-year-old man – an Australian citizen – has been charged with one count of murder. Other charges will follow. He will face the full force of the law in New Zealand. The families of the fallen will have justice.

 

He sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety.

 

And that is why you will never hear me mention his name.

 

He is a terrorist. He is a criminal. He is an extremist.

 

But he will, when I speak, be nameless.

 

And to others I implore you: speak the names of those who were lost, rather than name of the man who took them.

 

He may have sought notoriety, but we in New Zealand will give him nothing. Not even his name.

 

Mr Speaker, we will also look at the role social media played and what steps we can take, including on the international stage, and in unison with our partners.

 

There is no question that ideas and language of division and hate have existed for decades, but their form of distribution, the tools of organisation, they are new.

 

We cannot simply sit back and accept that these platforms just exist and that what is said on them is not the responsibility of the place where they are published. They are the publisher. Not just the postman. There cannot be a case of all profit no responsibility. This of course doesn’t take away the responsibility we too must show as a nation, to confront racism, violence and extremism. I don’t have all of the answers now, but we must collectively find them. And we must act.

 

Mr Speaker, we are deeply grateful for all messages of sympathy, support and solidarity that we are receiving from our friends all around the world. And we are grateful to the global Muslim community who have stood with us, and we stand with them.

 

Mr Speaker, I acknowledge that we too also stand with Christchurch, in a devastating blow that this has been to their recovery. I acknowledge every member of this House that has stood alongside their Muslim community but especially those in Canterbury as we acknowledge this double grief

 

As I conclude I acknowledge there are many stories that will have struck all of us since the 15th of March.

 

One I wish to mention, is that of Hati Mohemmed Daoud Nabi.

 

He was the 71-year-old man who opened the door at the Al-Noor mosque and uttered the words ‘Hello brother, welcome’. His final words.

 

Of course he had no idea of the hate that sat behind the door, but his welcome tells us so much – that he was a member of a faith that welcomed all its members, that showed openness, and care.

 

I have said many times Mr Speaker, we are a nation of 200 ethnicities, 160 languages. We open our doors to others and say welcome. And the only thing that must change after the events of Friday, is that this same door must close on all of those who espouse hate and fear.

 

Yes the person who committed these acts was not from here. He was not raised here. He did not find his ideology here, but that is not to say that those very same views do not live here.

 

I know that as a nation, we wish to provide every comfort we can to our Muslim community in this darkest of times. And we are. The mountain of flowers around the country that lie at the doors of mosques, the spontaneous song outside the gates. These are ways of expressing an outpouring of love and empathy. But we wish to do more.
We wish for every member of our communities to also feel safe.

 

Safety means being free from the fear of violence.

 

But it also means being free from the fear of those sentiments of racism and hate, that create a place where violence can flourish.

 

And every single one of us has the power to change that.

 

Mr Speaker on Friday it will be a week since the attack.

 

Members of the Muslim community will gather for worship on that day.

 

Let us acknowledge their grief as they do.

 

Let’s support them as they gather again for worship.

 

We are one, they are us.

 

Tatau tatau

 

Al salam Alaikum

 

Weh Rahmat Allah

 

Weh Barakaatuh

 





507 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  # 2201843 19-Mar-2019 16:20
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

loceff13:

From some the banking industry:


 


https://twitter.com/TSB_NZ/status/1107829054281932801


TSB has suspended all advertising on social media in the wake of the tragic events in Christchurch. TSB is disappointed in the role social media played in Friday’s tragedy and thinks it’s inappropriate to continue to support this channel. Our thoughts are with all those affected.


 


https://twitter.com/WestpacNZ/status/1107791340522225664


Westpac NZ has suspended all advertising on social media networks until further notice, including Facebook, and we will be engaging with social media companies about the publishing of harmful content.


 


media statement(pdf)


 



That's a great start - there was a post earlier talking about a change to social media, and not by it's creator - this is a good start. Forcing them to clean up their act or face losing revenue is definitely to be applauded.

2823 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2201853 19-Mar-2019 16:29
9 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Well I had success today and had a vile little white supremacist twitter troll in NZ's account suspended today. So that's a win.






Fat bottom Trump
10551 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 2201861 19-Mar-2019 16:42
4 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

@freitasm: As a small start, would you consider inserting an editing block that transforms the name of the shooter into something else if it is mentioned, like you previously have had auto-edits for the joke names of some businesses? I can think of plenty of appropriate substitutions and I'm sure others can as well, but even just asterisks would do.

 

  





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 




8596 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2201868 19-Mar-2019 16:49
Send private message quote this post

BarTender:

 

Well I had success today and had a vile little white supremacist twitter troll in NZ's account suspended today. So that's a win.

 

 

Well done!


788 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2201886 19-Mar-2019 17:30
Send private message quote this post

Some insight into the difficulties a company like facebook comes across with people uploading the video

 

 

 

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/christchurch-shooting/111391794/you-just-think-about-what-those-people-went-through--top-facebook-executive

 

 

 

 

Bickert, who is a former US federal prosecutor, said Facebook was first alerted to the video by police after the live-streaming had stopped and was then able to identify and remove it "within minutes".   

 

"We used our technology to make sure that specific version was off our site and could not be uploaded in future."

 

...

 

However, people had since created 800 "visually distinct" versions of the video, each of which Facebook had to hunt down and remove. 

 

...

 

But Bickert could not guarantee new edits of the video would not appear on Facebook. "Being a realist, people are going to create new versions," she said.

 

 


4907 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 2201913 19-Mar-2019 18:15
Send private message quote this post

It seems to be impossible to totally snuff out child porn, so why would this be different? :(


5240 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2201916 19-Mar-2019 18:38
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Yet more praise from The Washington Post ...

 

 

 

 

The Washington Post - The world is watching New Zealand’s Jacinda Ardern

 

March 19 at 12:59 AM

 


 Detractors said she was "all style and no substance.” ...

 

And, then, the terrorist attack in Christchurch happened.

 

Since a self-proclaimed white supremacist burst into two mosques in the South Island city Friday, killing at least 50 people and wounding dozens more, Ardern has become the face of her nation’s sorrow and grief, and its resolve.

 

Observers hailed the calm and compassion she has shown in the wake of the worst mass killing in her country’s modern history.

 

She led a multiparty delegation from the country’s capital, Wellington, to Christchurch, donning a black headscarf and mourning with relatives and friends of the victims.

 

She also promised to cover the funeral costs of all those slain. A photographer who covered her visit marveled at the prime minister’s composure and empathy.

 

“Ardern’s performance has been extraordinary - and I believe she will be strongly lauded for it both domestically and internationally,” political commentator Bryce Edwards of Victoria University in Wellington told Reuters.

 

Ardern has also followed through in rhetoric and action.

 

She immediately decried the white-nationalist ideology that fueled the massacre and spoke firmly for what she believed were her country’s values.

 

The death toll itself was a catalogue of New Zealand’s budding diversity.

 

"Among the dead were worshipers from Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Turkey, Malaysia, Indonesia, Somalia and Afghanistan,” my colleagues noted. “The youngest was a 3-year-old boy born in New Zealand to refugee parents from Somalia.”

 

“We represent diversity, kindness, compassion," Ardern said Friday. “A home for those who share our values. Refuge for those who need it. And those values will not and cannot be shaken by this attack.”

 

She insisted that the victims “are us” and the “perpetrator is not.”

 

Addressing the suspected shooter, an Australian national now in police custody, she warned: “You may have chosen us - we utterly reject and condemn you.”

 

Ardern says she will pursue changing New Zealand’s gun laws.

 

She said that her government will announce plans “within 10 days of this horrific act of terrorism” that she believes will make “our community safer.”

 

My colleagues reported that the “measures could include restricting the military-style semiautomatic weapons that were used in the attacks.”

 

Ardern has discussed full bans on these semiautomatic weapons as well as potentially requiring licenses for individual guns.

 

American advocates for gun control can only look on wistfully at the pace with which Ardern can act. ...

 





Sideface


633 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2201919 19-Mar-2019 18:48
Send private message quote this post

Tumblr was able to implement an algorithm to remove almost all images and nudity and sexual acts from their site. Sometimes that algorithm will mistake a genuine art work as pornographic, but there is no doubt it can be done.

 

From my understanding, the reason for the ban on nudity is that Tumblr were facing a ban from the Apple App store, because of claims that some nudes on Tumblr were under 18 (and without a model release form it is difficult to prove they were older).

 

Perhaps Facebook should be removed from the App store and perhaps Facebook could implement a similar algiorithim. But imagine the outcry if the algiorithim removed images or videos of semi-automatic weapons that weren't being used in a terrorist attack, especially in some parts of the world where gun ownership is almost a religion.





#include <standard.disclaimer>


BDFL - Memuneh
64454 posts

Uber Geek

Administrator
Trusted
Geekzone
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2201969 19-Mar-2019 19:42
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Here is a press release Facebook sent out today:

 

 

Our hearts go out to the victims, their families and the community affected by the horrific terrorist attacks in Christchurch. We remain shocked and saddened by this tragedy and are committed to working with leaders in New Zealand, other governments, and across the technology industry to help counter hate speech and the threat of terrorism. We continue to work around the clock to prevent this content from appearing on our site, using a combination of technology and people.

 

We have been working directly with the New Zealand Police to respond to the attack and support their investigation. We removed the attacker’s video within minutes of their outreach to us, and in the aftermath, we have been providing an on-the-ground resource for law enforcement authorities. We will continue to support them in every way we can. In light of the active investigation, police have asked us not to share certain details of what happened on Facebook. While we’re still reviewing this situation, we are able to provide the information below:

 

  • The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast. Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4000 times in total before being removed from Facebook.
  • The first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended.
  • Before we were alerted to the video, a user on 8chan posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site.
  • We designated both shootings as terror attacks, meaning that any praise, support and representation of the events violates our Community Standards and is not permitted on Facebook.
  • We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are actively identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface.
  • We removed the original Facebook Live video and hashed it so that other shares that are visually similar to that video are then detected and automatically removed from Facebook and Instagram.
  • Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems including the use of audio technology.
  • In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack globally. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services.
  • Member organizations of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT) coordinate regularly on terrorism and have been in close contact since the attack. We have shared more than 800 visually-distinct videos related to the attack via our collective database, along with URLs and context on our enforcement approaches. This incident highlights the importance of industry cooperation regarding the range of terrorists and violent extremists operating online.
  • We identified abusive content on other social media sites in order to assess whether or how that content might migrate to one of our platforms.

We will continue to work around the clock on this and will provide further updates as relevant.

 





17601 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 2201986 19-Mar-2019 20:03
Send private message quote this post

freitasm:

 

Just received:

 

 

A call from the companies providing internet access for the great majority of New Zealanders, to the companies with the greatest influence over social media content

 

You may be aware that on the afternoon of Friday 15 March, three of New Zealand’s largest broadband providers, Vodafone NZ, Spark and 2degrees, took the unprecedented step to jointly identify and suspend access to web sites that were hosting video footage taken by the gunman related to the horrific terrorism incident in Christchurch.

 

As key industry players, we believed this extraordinary step was the right thing to do in such extreme and tragic circumstances. Other New Zealand broadband providers have also taken steps to restrict availability of this content, although they may be taking a different approach technically.

 

We also accept it is impossible as internet service providers to prevent completely access to this material. But hopefully we have made it more difficult for this content to be viewed and shared - reducing the risk our customers may inadvertently be exposed to it and limiting the publicity the gunman was clearly seeking.

 

We acknowledge that in some circumstances access to legitimate content may have been prevented, and that this raises questions about censorship. For that we apologise to our customers. This is all the more reason why an urgent and broader discussion is required.

 

Internet service providers are the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff, with blunt tools involving the blocking of sites after the fact. The greatest challenge is how to prevent this sort of material being uploaded and shared on social media platforms and forums.

 

We call on Facebook, Twitter and Google, whose platforms carry so much content, to be a part of an urgent discussion at an industry and New Zealand Government level on an enduring solution to this issue.

 

We appreciate this is a global issue, however the discussion must start somewhere. We must find the right balance between internet freedom and the need to protect New Zealanders, especially the young and vulnerable, from harmful content. Social media companies and hosting platforms that enable the sharing of user generated content with the public have a legal duty of care to protect their users and wider society by preventing the uploading and sharing of content such as this video.

 

Although we recognise the speed with which social network companies sought to remove Friday’s video once they were made aware of it, this was still a response to material that was rapidly spreading globally and should never have been made available online. We believe society has the right to expect companies such as yours to take more responsibility for the content on their platforms.

 

Content sharing platforms have a duty of care to proactively monitor for harmful content, act expeditiously to remove content which is flagged to them as illegal and ensure that such material – once identified – cannot be re-uploaded.

 

Technology can be a powerful force for good. The very same platforms that were used to share the video were also used to mobilise outpourings of support. But more needs to be done to prevent horrific content being uploaded. Already there are AI techniques that we believe can be used to identify content such as this video, in the same way that copyright infringements can be identified. These must be prioritised as a matter of urgency.

 

For the most serious types of content, such as terrorist content, more onerous requirements should apply, such as proposed in Europe, including take down within a specified period, proactive measures and fines for failure to do so. Consumers have the right to be protected whether using services funded by money or data.

 

Now is the time for this conversation to be had, and we call on all of you to join us at the table and be part of the solution.

 

Simon Mouter (Managing Director, Spark). Jason Paris (Chief Executive, Vodafone NZ), Stewart Sherriff (Chief Executive 2degrees)

 

 

 

AWESOME +100

 

We all want super internet, but we also want SUPER internet, not deviants. This is not censorship. Censorship is preventing younger eyes. We need preventing all eyes from deviant sh!t


17601 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 2201991 19-Mar-2019 20:10
Send private message quote this post

DarthKermit:

 

It seems to be impossible to totally snuff out child porn, so why would this be different? :(

 

 

Its no different I guess, but the issue is we want to.

 

There is a backlash agianst social media, I hope this is global. So we can love social media and let it be social media and not a free uncensored deviant free for all


17601 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 2201996 19-Mar-2019 20:15
Send private message quote this post

freitasm:

 

Here is a press release Facebook sent out today:

 

 

Our hearts go out to the victims, their families and the community affected by the horrific terrorist attacks in Christchurch. We remain shocked and saddened by this tragedy and are committed to working with leaders in New Zealand, other governments, and across the technology industry to help counter hate speech and the threat of terrorism. We continue to work around the clock to prevent this content from appearing on our site, using a combination of technology and people.

 

We have been working directly with the New Zealand Police to respond to the attack and support their investigation. We removed the attacker’s video within minutes of their outreach to us, and in the aftermath, we have been providing an on-the-ground resource for law enforcement authorities. We will continue to support them in every way we can. In light of the active investigation, police have asked us not to share certain details of what happened on Facebook. While we’re still reviewing this situation, we are able to provide the information below:

 

  • The video was viewed fewer than 200 times during the live broadcast. No users reported the video during the live broadcast. Including the views during the live broadcast, the video was viewed about 4000 times in total before being removed from Facebook.
  • The first user report on the original video came in 29 minutes after the video started, and 12 minutes after the live broadcast ended.
  • Before we were alerted to the video, a user on 8chan posted a link to a copy of the video on a file-sharing site.
  • We designated both shootings as terror attacks, meaning that any praise, support and representation of the events violates our Community Standards and is not permitted on Facebook.
  • We removed the personal accounts of the named suspect from Facebook and Instagram, and are actively identifying and removing any imposter accounts that surface.
  • We removed the original Facebook Live video and hashed it so that other shares that are visually similar to that video are then detected and automatically removed from Facebook and Instagram.
  • Some variants such as screen recordings were more difficult to detect, so we expanded to additional detection systems including the use of audio technology.
  • In the first 24 hours, we removed about 1.5 million videos of the attack globally. More than 1.2 million of those videos were blocked at upload, and were therefore prevented from being seen on our services.
  • Member organizations of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT) coordinate regularly on terrorism and have been in close contact since the attack. We have shared more than 800 visually-distinct videos related to the attack via our collective database, along with URLs and context on our enforcement approaches. This incident highlights the importance of industry cooperation regarding the range of terrorists and violent extremists operating online.
  • We identified abusive content on other social media sites in order to assess whether or how that content might migrate to one of our platforms.

We will continue to work around the clock on this and will provide further updates as relevant.

 

 

 

It's no consolation, but its a lot like an air crash. Sad as it is, some good comes from it. Its too early to say but maybe this is our contribution to the planet. Maybe this is a turning point for evil. No. Im not religious, but perhaps this might be a big step ahead for a change.  


1 | ... | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | ... | 68
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Amazon Studios announces New Zealand as location for its upcoming series based on The Lord of the Rings
Posted 18-Sep-2019 17:24


The Warehouse chooses Elasticsearch service
Posted 18-Sep-2019 13:55


Voyager upgrades core network to 100Gbit
Posted 18-Sep-2019 13:52


Streaming service Acorn TV launches in New Zealand with selection with British shows
Posted 18-Sep-2019 08:55


Bitcoin.com announces partnership with smartphone manufacturer HTC
Posted 16-Sep-2019 21:30


Finalists Announced for Microsoft NZ Partner Awards
Posted 16-Sep-2019 19:37


OPPO Showcases New CameraX Capabilities at Google Developer Days China 2019
Posted 15-Sep-2019 12:42


New Zealand PC Market returns to growth
Posted 15-Sep-2019 12:24


Home sensor charity director speaks about the preventable death which drives her to push for healthy homes
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:46


Te ao Maori Minecraft world set to inspire Kiwi students
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:43


Research reveals The Power of Games in New Zealand
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:40


Ring Door View Cam now available in New Zealand
Posted 11-Sep-2019 08:38


Vodafone NZ to create X Squad
Posted 10-Sep-2019 10:25


Huawei nova 5T to be available 20th September
Posted 5-Sep-2019 11:55


Kogan.com launches prepay challenger brand Kogan Mobile in New Zealand
Posted 3-Sep-2019 11:42



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.