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Linuxluver

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  #2408244 28-Jan-2020 14:42
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Aaroona:

I've decided to start removing my funds from Harmoney - I've decided it now falls outside of my risk level to fund unsecured loans.


My RAR is at a respectable 11.49, still above the platform average, but I'm getting increasingly frustrated by the right offs, small bugs in the platform and am going to look at something new.


 


I know a while ago Harmoney spoke about providing a secondhand market for people to sell their stakes in loans - has anyone heard anymore about this?


I only have a small amount invested across about 150 loans, but would like to off-load asap.



I made the same decision over a year ago and began buying Tesla shares as funds came free from Harmoney via re-writes. It's been slow but steady. I'm down to the last 25% of funds invested. This seems to be the hard core. Very few re-writes.




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geoffwnz
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  #2408245 28-Jan-2020 14:47
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Linuxluver:
Aaroona:

 

I've decided to start removing my funds from Harmoney - I've decided it now falls outside of my risk level to fund unsecured loans.

 

My RAR is at a respectable 11.49, still above the platform average, but I'm getting increasingly frustrated by the right offs, small bugs in the platform and am going to look at something new.

 

I know a while ago Harmoney spoke about providing a secondhand market for people to sell their stakes in loans - has anyone heard anymore about this?

 

I only have a small amount invested across about 150 loans, but would like to off-load asap.

 



I made the same decision over a year ago and began buying Tesla shares as funds came free from Harmoney via re-writes. It's been slow but steady. I'm down to the last 25% of funds invested. This seems to be the hard core. Very few re-writes.

 

Same here.  Reinvesting was very much not keeping up with rewrites etc so I've been pulling the funds out in lumps and putting them into Sharesies instead. 





mattwnz
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  #2408350 28-Jan-2020 19:00
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I wonder if all the people buying shares via these new easier sources, like sharsies , is helping to pump up the share prices. They have really rocketed up in the last year, and am wondering if there is a bit of a bubble occurring.




dejadeadnz
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  #2408355 28-Jan-2020 19:24
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mattwnz:

 

I wonder if all the people buying shares via these new easier sources, like sharsies , is helping to pump up the share prices. They have really rocketed up in the last year, and am wondering if there is a bit of a bubble occurring.

 

 

Your average retail investor, even when combined to form a bloc, will still be utterly insignificant in terms of market influence when compared to institutional investors.

 

 

 

 


ANglEAUT
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  #2409374 28-Jan-2020 21:04
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geoffwnz: ... and putting them into Sharesies instead. 

 

How are your returns on Sharesies, if I may ask?

 

Yesterday, when I logged in, mine was 25.xx% That's as an "aggressive" investor with 37% in medium risk & 63% in higher risk stocks.

 

Click to see full size

 

 

 

23% certainly sounds better than 11%, but I'll calculate my actual return on the day I cash out.





Please keep this GZ community vibrant by contributing in a constructive & respectful manner.

 

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Linuxluver

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  #2409410 28-Jan-2020 23:40
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mattwnz:

I wonder if all the people buying shares via these new easier sources, like sharsies , is helping to pump up the share prices. They have really rocketed up in the last year, and am wondering if there is a bit of a bubble occurring.



The US share market is going crazy because the US Federal Reserve is printing money like crazy - US$60 billion a month - pumping it into the top teir banks. It's basically free money and it's being used to buy shares and pump up the stock market so Donald Trump can say he's created a booming share market.

The Fed is supposed to be independent, but they have clearly gone down a path in currency management that seems them blowing the biggest stock market bubble in history. They aren't alone. The EU Central bank is going exactly the same thing.

It's not inflationary (property market excepted) as most people don't get the money. Just the banksters and the people they lend to. Or mortgage interest rates are at record liows partly due to this.

Will this bubble never burst? That would be a first.




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mattwnz
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  #2409418 29-Jan-2020 00:23
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Linuxluver:
mattwnz:

 

I wonder if all the people buying shares via these new easier sources, like sharsies , is helping to pump up the share prices. They have really rocketed up in the last year, and am wondering if there is a bit of a bubble occurring.

 



The US share market is going crazy because the US Federal Reserve is printing money like crazy - US$60 billion a month - pumping it into the top teir banks. It's basically free money and it's being used to buy shares and pump up the stock market so Donald Trump can say he's created a booming share market.

The Fed is supposed to be independent, but they have clearly gone down a path in currency management that seems them blowing the biggest stock market bubble in history. They aren't alone. The EU Central bank is going exactly the same thing.

It's not inflationary (property market excepted) as most people don't get the money. Just the banksters and the people they lend to. Or mortgage interest rates are at record liows partly due to this.

Will this bubble never burst? That would be a first.

 

 

 

The thing is that when these bubbles burst, you get all these people coming out and saying that they could see all this happening in the background. eg the Sub prime mortgage lending thing during the last crisis. But noone actually says it is all a problem until it becomes a problem.  There seems to be a massive rush at the moment to buy property I have noticed,and it is pushing up prices in my town by over 10% in the last year. I am wondering if it is all this cheap money, and poor returns if you were to put it into term deposits, or anything else lower risk. Many people see property as almost zero risk of losing money. I remember 5 years ago, experts were saying that property prices were far too high, but today those prices look cheap, as money has lost it's buying power when it comes to property in NZ. Property prices in the many parts of the  US , or even the UK seem so cheap, when it used to be the opposite. 




geoffwnz
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  #2409467 29-Jan-2020 08:58
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ANglEAUT:

 

geoffwnz: ... and putting them into Sharesies instead. 

 

How are your returns on Sharesies, if I may ask?

 

Yesterday, when I logged in, mine was 25.xx% That's as an "aggressive" investor with 37% in medium risk & 63% in higher risk stocks.

 

Click to see full size

 

23% certainly sounds better than 11%, but I'll calculate my actual return on the day I cash out.

 

 

Today, 3.27%.  Couple of days ago, 5.something%.

 

But then, I'm putting funds in regularly and working on long term gains (over years, rather than just the past 6 months since I started), so while a number of the share values increased significantly since the initial investment, the subsequent investments reduce the theoretical returns as they are purchased at higher prices sometimes.

 

Additionally, the returns percent/value is only theoretical if I were to withdraw everything right now, today.  So, like you said, doesn't really count until the day you actually cash out.  Picking up dividend returns to reinvest is useful though. 





Linuxluver

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  #2409499 29-Jan-2020 09:47
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mattwnz:

The thing is that when these bubbles burst, you get all these people coming out and saying that they could see all this happening in the background. eg the Sub prime mortgage lending thing during the last crisis. But noone actually says it is all a problem until it becomes a problem.  There seems to be a massive rush at the moment to buy property I have noticed,and it is pushing up prices in my town by over 10% in the last year. I am wondering if it is all this cheap money, and poor returns if you were to put it into term deposits, or anything else lower risk. Many people see property as almost zero risk of losing money. I remember 5 years ago, experts were saying that property prices were far too high, but today those prices look cheap, as money has lost it's buying power when it comes to property in NZ. Property prices in the many parts of the  US , or even the UK seem so cheap, when it used to be the opposite. 



I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.




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I've been on Geekzone over 15 years..... Time flies.... 


Aaroona
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  #2409508 29-Jan-2020 10:04
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Linuxluver:

I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.

 

 

 

It's comments like that which do make me worry a little. I need to do some more research, I think. I have only a small portion money tied up in shares etc. at the moment, but I do have some money I need to do more proactive investing with, otherwise it's just going to rot at the bank. However I need a little more education before I go and make some big punts on stock or other investment opportunities.

 

 


networkn
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  #2409511 29-Jan-2020 10:06
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Aaroona:

 

Linuxluver:

I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.

 

 

 

It's comments like that which do make me worry a little. I need to do some more research, I think. I have only a small portion money tied up in shares etc. at the moment, but I do have some money I need to do more proactive investing with, otherwise it's just going to rot at the bank. However I need a little more education before I go and make some big punts on stock or other investment opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only invest in stocks, what you can afford to lose.

 

 


Aaroona
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  #2409528 29-Jan-2020 10:09
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networkn:

 

Aaroona:

 

Linuxluver:

I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.

 

 

 

It's comments like that which do make me worry a little. I need to do some more research, I think. I have only a small portion money tied up in shares etc. at the moment, but I do have some money I need to do more proactive investing with, otherwise it's just going to rot at the bank. However I need a little more education before I go and make some big punts on stock or other investment opportunities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only invest in stocks, what you can afford to lose.

 

 

 

 

Absolutely. There are "safer" investments, but realistically nothing is guaranteed. There's just different levels of risk.

 

I think I'm willing to go large at the moment, given my age. I still have many years to make it up if I need to. But still want to do it wisely, don't want this turning into /r/wallstreetbets


BlinkyBill
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  #2409530 29-Jan-2020 10:15
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Linuxluver:

I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.

 

According to Warren Buffett it is demonstrable that trying to predict Stockmarket corrections is an exercise in losing money. Even if the share market corrected by 30%, over the longish term you’ll get a better return than Bonds (not a scientific calculation, simply an illustrative one). Don’t take investment advice from me, but that strategy seems overly conservative, unless you are 70 years old+.


Fred99
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  #2409533 29-Jan-2020 10:20
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BlinkyBill:

 

Linuxluver:

I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.

 

According to Warren Buffett it is demonstrable that trying to predict Stockmarket corrections is an exercise in losing money. Even if the share market corrected by 30%, over the longish term you’ll get a better return than Bonds (not a scientific calculation, simply an illustrative one). Don’t take investment advice from me, but that strategy seems overly conservative, unless you are 70 years old+.

 

 

The yield curve inverted again yesterday. Of course while it would be unprecedented for there to not be a recession following yield curve inversion, I guess there's a first time for everything.  We are living in very strange times.

 

Stock market returns are of course historically very good, but (IIRC) once inflation is factored in, annual year on year gain of the major indices is only (less than?) 2% over the long term (ie 100 years etc).  The present (since 2009) stock price boom is absolutely unprecedented in inflation-adjusted terms.

 

Warren Buffett outperformed "the market" by a massive margin consistently for 1/2 century, whether that be by genius or luck or a bit of both.


BlinkyBill
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  #2409547 29-Jan-2020 10:36
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Fred99:

 

BlinkyBill:

 

Linuxluver:

I've cashed out of shares for now other than my Kiwisaver. I may switch that to bonds only very soon.

The bubble blowing by central banks may not end at all. But it won't be pretty if it does.

 

According to Warren Buffett it is demonstrable that trying to predict Stockmarket corrections is an exercise in losing money. Even if the share market corrected by 30%, over the longish term you’ll get a better return than Bonds (not a scientific calculation, simply an illustrative one). Don’t take investment advice from me, but that strategy seems overly conservative, unless you are 70 years old+.

 

 

The yield curve inverted again yesterday. Of course while it would be unprecedented for there to not be a recession following yield curve inversion, I guess there's a first time for everything.  We are living in very strange times.

 

Stock market returns are of course historically very good, but (IIRC) once inflation is factored in, annual year on year gain of the major indices is only (less than?) 2% over the long term (ie 100 years etc).  The present (since 2009) stock price boom is absolutely unprecedented in inflation-adjusted terms.

 

Warren Buffett outperformed "the market" by a massive margin consistently for 1/2 century, whether that be by genius or luck or a bit of both.

 

 

He did it by investing in ‘value’ companies, and not by predicting the market.


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